kathy1010
Member

Client wants address

Hi. I just turned down a client who wanted my "full address" on an NDA agreement. I assume I did the right thing, but just checking.

 

Thanks.

 

Virginia

ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Okay...

 

A more complete answer...

 

I think it depends on the situation.

 

If I think this is a real client who will pay me real money, then yes I would provide my real address.

 

But: It IS VERY UNUSUAL for any client on Upwork to ask for a freelancer's full address.

 

They really shouldn't need it.

 

But for money? Yeah, I might provide my address. They can't steal my identity with only my address.

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19 REPLIES 19
prestonhunter
Member

re: "I just turned down a client who wanted my "full address" on an NDA agreement. I assume I did the right thing, but just checking."

 

Did you do the right thing?

 

I don't know. Maybe.

 

There are really only two possibilities here:

a) This "client" is really just a scammer or an identity thief.

b) This is a real client who really wants to hire somebody to help with her project, and he legal dept. told her to get freelancers to sign this NDA form.

 

Based on what you told us, I don't believe you know which it is.

 

So it IS POSSIBLE that you turned down a legitimate client, a person who actually has no particular interest in NDAs or in your address, but was just doing what she was told.

 

I won't tell you what to do. But as for ME PERSONALLY, I have OFTEN been asked to sign NDAs. I have earned large amounts of money working for clients who asked me to sign NDAs.

 

If a client (or potential client) asks me to sign an NDA, I read it and sign it and return it to the client. If the NDA includes a space for my address, I can just note that the address is "on file with Upwork," which completely true.

 

ANY client who asks for my address or other personal information can safely be referred to Upwork Customer Service, where they can find out what information is appropriate and inappropriate to ask for, what information is held on file by Upwork, what information can be confirmed, etc. For any real client, this should be sufficient.

My philosophy about this:

Any real client just wants to hire you and get the work done. An NDA with a blank spot for "address" is simply a hoop that the client has been asked to jump through. Sign it, without the address, and a real client will be satisfied.

I've added my full address to NDAs loads of times. And so have the clients - it cuts both ways. 

Really? I've never been asked before.

> Really? I've never been asked before.

 

Yes, really. Can't imagine why you'd think I'd make that up.

 

A lot of people seem to believe a contract is only valid with full contact details included. And that sort of information would make it easier if someone wanted to sue for a breach. It's obviously your perogative to withhold your address, but I've never had any problems in doing this.

Kim, I wasn't implying you made it up. I was just surprised.

Preston - I didn't include the whole story. Sorry. I DID sign the NDA and sent it to him yesterday. He sent it back overnight asking for the whole address. It feels weird.

 

And yes, in my reply, I did say Upwork has all my personal info.

Okay...

 

A more complete answer...

 

I think it depends on the situation.

 

If I think this is a real client who will pay me real money, then yes I would provide my real address.

 

But: It IS VERY UNUSUAL for any client on Upwork to ask for a freelancer's full address.

 

They really shouldn't need it.

 

But for money? Yeah, I might provide my address. They can't steal my identity with only my address.

Interesting, because it is a high-paying gig. OK, I'll message him back. As usual, your answers are invaluable. Thanks.

I wish you well...

 

Somebody who asks for my full address, they're definitely on a "short leash" with me. I would treat them with the utmost respect, but I'm keeping an eye on them.

 

There are no delays in getting an official contract set up. No excuses. No "exceptions" to Upwork's rules.

 

No unpaid "training" period.

 

The assumption here is that this is a serious client who is following orders to get an NDA signed so that she can hire real freelancers to do real work. That means the client uses the "Hire" button immediately.

It's made a difference to my attitude to see the client's full address on the NDA when it's been sent to me.

 

None of the ones I've signed have been due to someone receiving orders, however. I primarily deal with individuals, so it isn't a case of their corporate address and my home address.

 

 

That makes sense. Thanks.

You got it, Preston.

I have a client that just sent me an NDA requesting my address and drivers license number. Is that normal?

 

Hi Kimberly,

 

Some clients request freelancers to sign NDA. However, you shouldn't share your personal information with the client especially before you have an official contract with them on Upwork.

~ Valeria
Upwork


@Kimberley T C wrote:

I have a client that just sent me an NDA requesting my address and drivers license number. Is that normal?


Asking for an NDA is pretty common. Asking for a drivers license number is not.

I was asked to sign an NDA with my second-ever project but he didn't request an address. He didn't seem to need/want one. 


@Preston H wrote:

 

 

ANY client who asks for my address or other personal information can safely be referred to Upwork Customer Service, where they can find out what information is appropriate and inappropriate to ask for, what information is held on file by Upwork, what information can be confirmed, etc. For any real client, this should be sufficient.


 Well, except that Upwork can't be served with legal process on behalf of the freelancer, and if the freelancer did in some way violate the NDA, the client would very likely have to obtain a court order to get Upwork to release that information before it was able to pursue any legal recourse--something that adds unnecessary time and expense to the process in a situation in which time may very much be of the essence (for example, in the event of a need for a protective order).

 

You may argue that that's just a risk/expense the client has to accept, and that's a defensible position. But, not every "real client" will agree that he/she should weaken the enforceability of the NDA in this way. Insistence on the standard legal format in no way suggests that the client isn't legitimate, or serious, or ethical.

I've never hesitated to provide my address or any other contact information on an NDA. I try to avoid introducing unnecessary friction points into administrative processes. 

 

But I would never provide my DL# or any other personal information that is part of my financial identity. (Nor have I ever been asked.) I would assume that is boilerplate language and explain to the client why that would be a non-starter for me. Only in the case of a very large and very juicy contract, with a client I could vet fully on my own, would that conversation go any farther.