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cobenedict
Member

Client wants to cancel project after I submitted work

Good evening, was hoping someone could help me out here.

I just submitted work to a client. Their posting was straightforward. A fixed price contract. They had 10 articles and they were looking for someone to "re-work" and write the articles "slightly better", so I continued on the way I understood it. I just submitted all of the work after 5 hours of working, and they don't like the articles. They wanted the articles to be completely rewritten with different words altogether to avoid a plagiarism problem. I asked what their proposed solution is and they suggested they cancel the project and move on.

 

What should I do in this situation? It's frustrating to me because I did exactly what they asked for, and it's frustrating to them because they didn't get what they wanted. Do I still get paid if they cancel the project? 

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lysis10
Member


Connor B wrote:

Good evening, was hoping someone could help me out here.

I just submitted work to a client. Their posting was straightforward. A fixed price contract. They had 10 articles and they were looking for someone to "re-work" and write the articles "slightly better", so I continued on the way I understood it. I just submitted all of the work after 5 hours of working, and they don't like the articles. They wanted the articles to be completely rewritten with different words altogether to avoid a plagiarism problem. I asked what their proposed solution is and they suggested they cancel the project and move on.

 

What should I do in this situation? It's frustrating to me because I did exactly what they asked for, and it's frustrating to them because they didn't get what they wanted. Do I still get paid if they cancel the project? 


You have to be really careful of these requests. First, they are usually stolen articles that they want to be "unique," so you're just plagiarizing. Only way to do it right is to write a new article.


The other instance (which I come across a lot) is they hire some ESL who writes filler content with no substance, and they expect you to "edit" it. You can edit it but it's just tighter filler with no substance, and they get mad. 

 

This client probably has no money, so your only option is to go into dispute, tell them you want it all and then pay the $291 for arbitration. If the client can't pay, you get the money back along with the escrow.

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12 REPLIES 12
wlyonsatl
Member

Is the project hourly or fixed price?

 

If fixed price, did you insist the amount of the project be funded in escrow and then submit the work using the "Submit" button on the project page.

 

If hourly, did you track your time spent using the TimeTracker app?

Hey Will. The entire amount owed is fixed in escrow. The client is asking I accept that he close the project without accepting funds and asks me to promise I won't come after him looking for money. I told him I'd like to be paid but asked him to wait while I did some research before makign a decision

 

I submitted the work using the "submit" button.

versailles
Member


Connor B wrote:

They wanted the articles to be completely rewritten with different words altogether to avoid a plagiarism problem.


So you realize that you just helped someone spin articles written by someone else?

 

 

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless

Rene

His original project quote claimed he owned all of the articles and my understanding was he just wanted me to make them more native-sounding (the grammar was abhorrent). Of course, afterwards he tells me that Google will never accept his work and the articles are PLR 

 

Still not sure what to do here

lysis10
Member


Connor B wrote:

Good evening, was hoping someone could help me out here.

I just submitted work to a client. Their posting was straightforward. A fixed price contract. They had 10 articles and they were looking for someone to "re-work" and write the articles "slightly better", so I continued on the way I understood it. I just submitted all of the work after 5 hours of working, and they don't like the articles. They wanted the articles to be completely rewritten with different words altogether to avoid a plagiarism problem. I asked what their proposed solution is and they suggested they cancel the project and move on.

 

What should I do in this situation? It's frustrating to me because I did exactly what they asked for, and it's frustrating to them because they didn't get what they wanted. Do I still get paid if they cancel the project? 


You have to be really careful of these requests. First, they are usually stolen articles that they want to be "unique," so you're just plagiarizing. Only way to do it right is to write a new article.


The other instance (which I come across a lot) is they hire some ESL who writes filler content with no substance, and they expect you to "edit" it. You can edit it but it's just tighter filler with no substance, and they get mad. 

 

This client probably has no money, so your only option is to go into dispute, tell them you want it all and then pay the $291 for arbitration. If the client can't pay, you get the money back along with the escrow.

Jennifer, I usually avoid these types but he specifically said he owned the articles and his project post was looking for a "re-work" to make the terms better. 

 

In this case, since the full amount is in escrow and I submitted the work according to the project brief, am I entiteld to full amount of the money? 


Connor B wrote:

Jennifer, I usually avoid these types but he specifically said he owned the articles and his project post was looking for a "re-work" to make the terms better. 

 

In this case, since the full amount is in escrow and I submitted the work according to the project brief, am I entiteld to full amount of the money? 


You have to go into a dispute, so if they sent you a formal refund request, you respond with an "LOL, no" and then it goes into mediation. The mediator will talk to both of you. IME, they always suggest you do edits, but at this point that ship has sailed, so I suggest telling the mediator "no, I want arbitration." Pay the $291 and the client will disappear.

 

It's a gamble but it works for me, and I'm the degenerate of this group with lots and lots of disputes under my belt. The client will rant at you in this private room that they create for you. Grab a beer and some popcorn and LOL at them as they threaten you will alll kinds of things. It's hilarious. Say nothing back to them. The only thing that matters is that you respond to the mediator in the given timeframe. Answer their emails and let them know what you want.

oh also, I should say that the client has to actually file a refund request. if they haven't done this then say nothing until they file a refund request. You'll get an email if they do.

Just seems like such a waste of time. But thanks for the positive advice and I hope this works out, this is my living that this person's trying to mess with and it's very frustrating.


Connor B wrote:

Just seems like such a waste of time. But thanks for the positive advice and I hope this works out, this is my living that this person's trying to mess with and it's very frustrating.


__________________

 

You did the work, you hold out for the money. I expect the client has pulled this stunt many times. Call his bluff. 

CB,

 

As a UW veteran in your niche, I'm going to strongly suggest that you make an upfront payment a non-negotiable feature on all Fixed Rate bids.

I've found that this simple step very effectively weeds out all the bottom feeders.

There are just far too many shady and outright unscrupulous scammers on this platform for you to accept anything less.

Scammy clients like this one are everywhere so get your money before you even consider beginning work.

 

Work smart, work safe!

wb


william b wrote:

CB,

 

As a UW veteran in your niche, I'm going to strongly suggest that you make an upfront payment a non-negotiable feature on all Fixed Rate bids.

I've found that this simple step very effectively weeds out all the bottom feeders.

There are just far too many shady and outright unscrupulous scammers on this platform for you to accept anything less.

Scammy clients like this one are everywhere so get your money before you even consider beginning work.

 

Work smart, work safe!

wb


Telling him to ask people to give him money upfront will just lose him all kinds of money. He's a mechanical engineer writing low-tier content. This is part of the game, but he can fight it by just demanding arbitration. Besides, the client has 30 days to request a refund on an upfront payment. It doesn't really save you on anything but it makes you look like a scammer.

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