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Client withdrawn offer

karinskold
Community Guru
Karin S Member Since: Dec 6, 2009
1 of 6

Hi,

 

I was given an offer for a job after few days conversation, and explanation of the job ( an illustration)

I am in a totally different time zone so could not respond at once. And it was not in a hurry either. He told.

Then just now in front of my eyes the client  withdrawn the offer..and gave it to someone else. Just like that !

Made me quite angry after all conversation we had and time I spent to read and agree..Smiley Sad

 

What to say..some clients I would more than reccomend here then a few are just..Smiley Sad

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2 of 6
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@Karin S wrote:

Hi,

 

I was given an offer for a job after few days conversation, and explanation of the job ( an illustration)

I am in a totally different time zone so could not respond at once. And it was not in a hurry either. He told.

Then just now in front of my eyes the client  withdrawn the offer..and gave it to someone else. Just like that !

Made me quite angry after all conversation we had and time I spent to read and agree..Smiley Sad

 

What to say..some clients I would more than reccomend here then a few are just..Smiley Sad


This is not nice. However, this happens. Perhaps the client disliked something or found a cheaper or better freelancer. I am not sure if this was the job discussed before with the client not answering any more. It this was the same client that answers your questions before.

kat303
Community Guru
Kathy T Member Since: Jul 17, 2015
3 of 6

Sometimes it's not an advantage to give away too much information during a phone conversations. I don't know what was said or what information was given and by whom it was given, I do know that at times, when a contractor tells a client in detail what they will do, how they will do it, what programs they will use etc the client then has all that information. He takes that, knowing exactly what, how etc and hires a cheaper contractor giving them that information to work with.  I'm not implying that you did this, but just giving  you a heads up.

 

Most information given during an interview stage would be on the clients part. That would be information concerning their job, what they want done, how they want it and any other information given to YOU to clarify what the results they expect. Any information they start asking you concerning the job, should be given by you AFTER you're hired. And that information should be handled as a consulation. And as with any consulation, you should be paid for it.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
4 of 6

@Kathy T wrote:

Sometimes it's not an advantage to give away too much information during a phone conversations. I don't know what was said or what information was given and by whom it was given, I do know that at times, when a contractor tells a client in detail what they will do, how they will do it, what programs they will use etc the client then has all that information. He takes that, knowing exactly what, how etc and hires a cheaper contractor giving them that information to work with.  I'm not implying that you did this, but just giving  you a heads up.

 

Most information given during an interview stage would be on the clients part. That would be information concerning their job, what they want done, how they want it and any other information given to YOU to clarify what the results they expect. Any information they start asking you concerning the job, should be given by you AFTER you're hired. And that information should be handled as a consulation. And as with any consulation, you should be paid for it.


This is rare though. I'm sure it happens, but a client who wants a phone conversation is most likely a serious client interested in your work. I would say that it's so rare that I wouldn't hesitate to brainstorm with them and just write it off if it's one of those rare moments. You don't have to give away everything to brainstorm with someone.

 

My rule of thumb is to stay aware of the signs, but treat everyone as an honest client looking for work unless they prove otherwise. If you approach everyone as if they are a scammer, you're doing yourself a disservice. 

alanhorenstein
Community Leader
Alan H Member Since: Nov 23, 2014
5 of 6

@Jennifer, I agree with your premise that going into a live interview is an opportunity to share and build mutual trust. It's also a chance for the freelancer to see if you have the right stuff to excel on the project, and to see if you can generate rapport.

 

I get hired a nice percentage of the time that I have a client call. The times that I don't get hired, it's generally due to one of these main scenarios: I am not well-qualified enough, or the client is not ready to commit to me, or the client is mining Upwork for free information. I'd say the last case occurs in about 10% of my interviews.  Some early stage entrepreneurs are posting jobs and interviewing candidates just to help them develop their concept, or to see if anyone really wows them enough to spend some money here. I can't blame them.

 

Frankly, I enjoy the process so much that I don't mind spending an unpaid hour once a month to help a stranger brainstorm. I do it in coffee shops, so why not on Skype, with a potential client? I also owe it to the game: while developing my own projects, I've gotten many valuable insights from helpful salespeople and account managers that I never bought from.

 

Still, to the OP's point, and to Kathy, "ABC."  Always Be Closing. I run my interview calls ike this: generate rapport, have a great conversation, then when there is an opportune pause, ask if the potential client has enough information to start a contract. If the answer is that he or she still has to interview a few more candidates, that's a soft rejection.  If they ask more questions, I continue the discussion, then I try to close again. None of this should take more than an hour.

kcraw1985
Active Member
Dr. Krystal C Member Since: Jul 27, 2016
6 of 6

@Kathy T wrote:

Sometimes it's not an advantage to give away too much information during a phone conversations. I don't know what was said or what information was given and by whom it was given, I do know that at times, when a contractor tells a client in detail what they will do, how they will do it, what programs they will use etc the client then has all that information. He takes that, knowing exactly what, how etc and hires a cheaper contractor giving them that information to work with.  I'm not implying that you did this, but just giving  you a heads up.

 


 WOW! I did not know that. Hasn't happened to me, but I would consider your advice during an interview next time.

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