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Re: Clients not paying for work | A different solution.

bizwriterjohn
Community Guru
John B Member Since: Aug 20, 2015
11 of 30

The $20k a estimate as "only" is correct.  Precision matters.   I took last year out, for example, for a project that was not on Upwork from a traditional, past employer, who asked me to work as an employee of sorts.  I asked them to go Upwork, it is external prospects/employers who have the choice, I was not happy about it, it is how it was.   Which is a lot of justification that is un-necessary anyway, other than to state: never, in 7 years, across work from past employers, on Upwork, on oDesk, before that on Elance before that in my consulting career -- ever.  Across what not totals more than x,xxx,xxx over a 25,000career has that happened.

 

-------------------

Yes, I am not a new contractor.  Which is exactly why I recommend those read the book I read when I was a new-comer in my time.

I also used this extraordinarly indepth time tracking sheet in my first project, to make sure my time was exactly related, in a tool that could be circulated in the company, and that actually returned the comment:  "We were thinking $2k budget, it is much more.  You can see my profile, my first job, you can see what it turned out to be".

Even as a new comer, first project, day one, 7 years ago about to the day.  I used tactics to enjoy my work was justified. 

bizwriterjohn
Community Guru
John B Member Since: Aug 20, 2015
12 of 30

This provided additional viewing of my time allocation.  It was my first extra helpful too, first day on Upwork (oDesk) back then.

bizwriterjohn
Community Guru
John B Member Since: Aug 20, 2015
13 of 30

 I also created an adjunct project delivery tracking sheet as I was engaged in delivering NN separate pieces of major IP, including the blend-in of another Upworker for Design and visual production.  My first 'bring in another Upworker so they share the wealth.  Got that one done project done. Happy about that.

This made sure clients could see the progress of NN projects run concurrently.  It again helped the client to "know what they are paying for".

This does not require experience to do or figure out.  These are basic tools anyone can implement and they have foundations in client care and concern -- and common sense.  If anyone has external to Upwork tools to help expand client knowledge of work delivered, expanded views into their work -- particularly those who are struggling with no-pays, now is a good time to share them. 

I charged for the time to conduct them.  You can see the result.

bizwriterjohn
Community Guru
John B Member Since: Aug 20, 2015
14 of 30

This is provided as part of my portfolio. It has client approval to be shared.  There is no breach of NDA here, Valeria. That is sacrosanct.

The tactic worked.  I got to write the results of combined effort 3 years later. I provide that simply so we see: these tools matter, these tools help, the stakes can be high, and successful management of the client might be a breakthrough for.... them.

 

This is published in my portfolio. This is not a breach of NDA nor 'bragging'.  This is my contribution. 

bizwriterjohn
Community Guru
John B Member Since: Aug 20, 2015
15 of 30

The PMI (Project Management Institute) provides a body of knoweldge called the PMBOK.  Project Manager's Book of Knowledge.  Google it: it can be found on Amazon.  I would perhaps consider Upworkers who are suffering from No-Pays, perhaps motivated to purchase this gold standard of project delivery best practices.

Read it.  Read it again.  Learn to use it. Use it.  And bring in not only Professional Sales tactics -- bring in Professional Delivery tactics, from the master-class source.

 

 

bizwriterjohn
Community Guru
John B Member Since: Aug 20, 2015
16 of 30

Since I am consistenly challenged by specific Upworkers on veractity and viability of my information, I must relate: the figure of $x,xxx,xxx in sales-delivery is actually $12,000,000 plus Upwork.  The 12-mil part came from my work in the 1990s, Upwork did not exist, I led sales in a 600-person IT consulting firm, we obviously delivered 12-mil projects and that is not bragging.  Someone simply said, only $20k a year.  That is all I need, as you can imagine the downstreams of selling 12mil a year for delivery teams on commission.
I do not keep my pay stubs for that work.

So yes, in a way, you are right.  I brought in massive industry expertise in forming deals, positioning clients, making sure we had no-pays.  Approximately 50:1 in size.  That is not bragging, that is to address the concern my experience base is only $20k a year.  It is $40k actually, plus outside wor3k but anyway, I need not justify reality. It is that.

Yes, I had/have the advantage of industry training, in rate x hours and fixed-fee consulting work.  I have provided advice:
Gain the knowledge of two books.  That is where I started

Strategic Selling by Miller Heiman
PMBOK by PMI.

Here's the harsh part: I was let know where near deal formation until I was trained for 3 months, full time, by mentors.  Mentors.  Trained by mentors.  We have covered this topic, yes?  And my adherence to it as best practice on either side.  Mentoree (I love misspelling that word now).
- Boomer (as is my beloved nickname now).

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
17 of 30

John B, 

 

What you earn per year is not your only challenge. 

 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
18 of 30

John B wrote:

Since I am consistenly challenged by specific Upworkers on veractity and viability of my information, I must relate: the figure of $x,xxx,xxx in sales-delivery is actually $12,000,000 plus Upwork.  The 12-mil part came from my work in the 1990s, Upwork did not exist, I led sales in a 600-person IT consulting firm, we obviously delivered 12-mil projects and that is not bragging.  Someone simply said, only $20k a year. 


I know I've been pretty hard on you, but now you have my sympathy. I'm sure it's tough to be reduced from that level of success in youth to being reduced to working for mediocre hourly rates through a freelancing platform in middle age. I have a much better understanding of your need to puff up your reputation now.

bizwriterjohn
Community Guru
John B Member Since: Aug 20, 2015
19 of 30

- Yes I reasonably expect a client to pay for work, from Hour One of agreed-to work -

If I have chosen a viable client.  If I have correctly defined and positioned the work.  If my delivery work is true-and-well useful, and if I provide sufficient justification that true-and-real work was delivered.

When those conditions are met, chance are good 100% of clients will pay.  Notice there are four caveats before I set expections they will pay.
- I have chosen a viable client.  Not them chosen me and I automatically say yes.

Question.  Has anyone turned down work before an offer was even made, because in early discussions -- knowing an offer was likely to be made --  when it became likely I was dealing with a squirrely potential client.  Career lifetime?  Turned down work.   I will spare the metrics of my average "walk-away" rate once I bump up against probable issuance of acceptance. 

Upwork would approve.  If a contractor sense unviable client, what they want is pristine work and they most probably would extend a trust factor.  The potential client will have back-up providers, they are likely to lose no revenue and Upwork values contractors who protect their JSS, as a top JSS is what they want us to protect before and after deal-sign.

Questions to ponder:  if a client exhibits signs of non-viable.  How do you sense it?  Do you have criteria they must meet?  Do you have frank discussions to ensure delivery is known,  What are your tactics, how do you ensure a no-pay never happens again, in qualification steps.  A list is good to have.  Depending solely on their past hiring history is not always useful.

Here is another tactic to use - and be aware of.  I have never done this before.  And an Upworker pointed out I have had only 12 hires -- which is minimal.  Comical, as that Upworker has made zero hires, let's bypass how ridiculous it is to call that out.  It is just meaness in my opinion.  That realted.

Clients have two ways to leave ratings. Those we see, those we do not. Both impact our JSS.  SOme clients -- I have never done this -- chose to leave 5-0s because they do not want to be seen as issuing lessing.  That hurts them in their version of JSS.  Behind the scenes they can skewer contractors with ratings we do not see.

HEre's the impact.  Do you look at the ratings clients have issued first, or the return ratings Upworkers issued.  It commonly makes an Upworker look not very good to issue a low client rating, having gotten a 5-0.  We know the search is for 5-0 and probably consider low ratings from contractors a sign of their inability to get along.

So words to the wise.  Ratings issued is not a talisman to count on.  Ratings received -- well gosh.  Are you a better contractor that the one who could not get along.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
20 of 30

John B wrote:

say yes.

Question.  Has anyone turned down work before an offer was even made, because in early discussions -- knowing an offer was likely to be made --  when it became likely I was dealing with a squirrely potential client.  Career lifetime?  Turned down work.   I will spare the metrics of my average "walk-away" rate once I bump up against probable issuance of acceptance. 

 

Of course, all the time--as I'm sure do all established freelancers. Not just because clients are squirrely, but because it seems to me that our work styles won't mesh, because I just don't like them, because I'm temporarily burned out on writing that type of content, because I think it would be silly for them to pay my rates when they don't need my full skill set and I can refer them to someone who will do a great job for them at half the price and so on, and so on, and so on. 

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