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Re: Contract on hold / Re-activated

pxpaween
Active Member
Paween P Member Since: Feb 3, 2020
1 of 5

Earlier I just submitted my work to one of my clients. After that my contract are on hold for unknown reason.

Recently I just got re-activated and the client asked me to redo some of the work. My question is Should I continue to do it or not? How risks I am for not getting paid? (escrow method)

varungs
Community Guru
Varun G Member Since: Dec 11, 2019
2 of 5

If the contract was previously on hold but is now not on hold, you can safely resume work and you're no longer at risk. Well, more precisely, you're equally at risk here as you are with the rest of your contracts.

pxpaween
Active Member
Paween P Member Since: Feb 3, 2020
3 of 5

Did Escrow method guarantee anything?

varungs
Community Guru
Varun G Member Since: Dec 11, 2019
4 of 5
I'm new to Upwork, so please take my advice with a grain of salt. In most cases, a contract being on hold is a function of your client's payment method not working. I think this usually happens on hourly contracts. I'm not 100% of the circumstances under which this would happen to fixed-price contracts. But, as far as I am aware, as long as your milestone is funded, then the money is with Upwork and you are as safe as you can be in a fixed-price contract. (As safe as you can be because the client can ultimately decide not to release the funds even after submission and may raise a dispute, which is rare but possible.)
petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
5 of 5

When a client account is put on hold, all their contracts are also put on hold, regardless of whether they are hourly or fixed rate.

 

The fact that the contract was quickly resumed means that whatever the issue may have been has been resolved, so I would not worry about it.

 

It happens from time to tie, more often with some clients than others, and in my personal experience it is usually quickly resolved.

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