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Cost per word

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
21 of 47

@Margarete M wrote:

If somebody claims to be a translator (not just doing translations from time to time), normally this has to be proven by an exam at a university or school or an officially recognized examination. 


 Not true. Not even in Germany

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22 of 47
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@Petra R wrote:

@Margarete M wrote:

If somebody claims to be a translator (not just doing translations from time to time), normally this has to be proven by an exam at a university or school or an officially recognized examination. 


 Not true. Not even in Germany


You are right that this profession is not protected like most other professions and everybody can claim to be a translator. However, when an official document has to be translated it will be done by somebody who has passed an officially recognized examination.

Community Guru
Andrea B Member Since: Feb 20, 2015
23 of 47

You are right that this profession is not protected like most other professions and everybody can claim to be a translator. However, when an official document has to be translated it will be done by somebody who has passed an officially recognized examination.

This is why I never apply for jobs that require a certified translation. Actually I never accept interviews/apply for jobs that are beyond my possibilities.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
24 of 47

@Margarete M wrote:


You are right that this profession is not protected like most other professions and everybody can claim to be a translator. However, when an official document has to be translated it will be done by somebody who has passed an officially recognized examination.


 I have proofread the translations of many "certified" translators and frankly they were, overall, no better than those of equivalent non-certified ones. In fact many too slavishly clung to the source text, thus creating text that sounds stilted and translated. Perfectly correct as far as spelling, punctuation, and grammar goes. Dire copy nevertheless, devoid of vibrancy or whatever individuality the source text may have had.

 

Translation is partly craft, partly art.

 

You can teach and certify the craft part. Not the "art" part.

Community Guru
Joachim M Member Since: Mar 23, 2015
25 of 47

@Petra R wrote:

@Margarete M wrote:


You are right that this profession is not protected like most other professions and everybody can claim to be a translator. However, when an official document has to be translated it will be done by somebody who has passed an officially recognized examination.


 I have proofread the translations of many "certified" translators and frankly they were, overall, no better than those of equivalent non-certified ones. In fact many too slavishly clung to the source text, thus creating text

that sounds stilted and translated. Perfectly correct as far as spelling, punctuation, and grammar goes. Dire copy nevertheless, devoid of vibrancy or whatever individuality the source text may have had.

 

That's most difficult part in it. Recreating the the source text in the new language.

 

BTW, the quality of a certified translator often also depends on where she/he studied. I've seen translations from EN into DE from Eastern Europe, done by certified translators that were simply wrong.

 

Translation is partly craft, partly art.

 

True.

 

You can teach and certify the craft part. Not the "art" part.

 

Over time you can learn the "art" part though. Maybe never enough to translate a book but good enough to translate most other texts. For me sales and marketing texts are easiest as I have worked in sales for more than 40 years. Followed by technical texts, as all my sales experience was in technical sales, specifically software and IT.


 

Community Guru
Joachim M Member Since: Mar 23, 2015
26 of 47

@Margarete M wrote:

If somebody claims to be a translator (not just doing translations from time to time), normally this has to be proven by an exam at a university or school or an officially recognized examination. 


Only if the client needs a certified translation. This is hardly ever the case. 

Community Guru
Joachim M Member Since: Mar 23, 2015
27 of 47

@Margarete M wrote:

I do not understand why clients want to pay nearly nothing but expect quality. Nobody can use these low-quality Google translations... The client can just feed Google translate with his text and will have the same (low) quality - free of charge.


 In most cases the client isn't aware that he received a machine translation.

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
28 of 47

@Andrea B wrote:

 

First of all, I'm not a pro translator. I'm doing this in my free time - 

 

(...)

 

My rates start from $0.015 per word for texts so easy that I don't even need to open a vocabulary, and I can go up to $0.05/word .


Ok.

 

You said it all.

 

Says a professional translator who provides quality results and who wouldn't touch jobs below $0.06 (on Upwork) or below $0.08 (in the real world), even with a stick.

 

But I guess clients who pay peanuts for amateurs have what they deserve :-)

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Community Guru
Andrea B Member Since: Feb 20, 2015
29 of 47

Says a professional translator who provides quality results and who wouldn't touch jobs below $0.06 (on Upwork) or below $0.08 (in the real world), even with a stick.

I am the stick, Rene. Smiley Very Happy

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
30 of 47

"I am the stick, Rene."

 

Andrea, you are dilettante at best. Maybe talented, but it seems you have yet to prove it. If you undercut other freelancers to the extent you claim, then you are doing yourself, as well as professional  translators on this site, a very real disservice.

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