Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Re: Dealing with a Client Who Turned Out To Be a Farmer

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
11 of 16

Melanie H wrote:

Petra R wrote:

This is only allowed for fixed rate contracts with the client's knowledge and consent.


^ Underlined and bolded: so since the OP wasn't advised in advance


The OP is not the client.

The OP presumably does not know if the end-client is on Upwork at all and / or has consented to subcontracting.

 

 

Active Member
Bradshaw S Member Since: Feb 10, 2019
12 of 16
John K wrote:

 

I agree with that assessment. And it can actually be in the farmers' interest to keep JSS down, so that their go-to freelancers have a hard time getting jobs from anyone else.

 The more transactions Upwork gets, the more money they make. Over time will this profit outweigh the hit that they take from the slow degradation as dissatisfied clients and freelancers who had the misfortune to work with farmers leave the platform? Who knows.

 

 


@melaniekhenson wrote:

I feel like a ding-dong right now but what is a farmer? Are we talking about people who farm work out to others?

 

If so, I feel like there are gigantic drawbacks, for the same reasons I think there are drawbacks when freelancers work for agencies. In the latter case: IF (and that's a big "if") the agency has feedback reflecting only two (at the most) people in the agency - i.e. "Clarice was great to work for! Recommend!" - then I can perhaps get a feel for how "the agency" is to work for. But if it's a bajillion agents, well...then it's more of a gamble, IMO.

 

I have to think it's the same for clients thinking they're hiring one specific person and as it turns out, the actual freelancer could be anyone. It could even be somone the "farmer" (if I'm using this in the right context) has never worked with before. So for these reasons I just feel like so much can go wrong, in both these cases.

 

JMHO. Again, I'm sure some people must have amazing experiences both ways, but particularly with accepting a job and then farming the work out to just some rando willing to work for pennies, I can't believe clients aren't screaming about that. Perhaps they are; I don't go on the Clients board as much as I'm here.


Yes, farm work out to others and you're right it's very stupid. This guy didn't even understand how to delegate work. He requested 300 words for a radio ad and then came back and said this is way too long I can't use this it needs to be 30 seconds and this took 2 minutes to read LOL. So he wasted his money paying me to do something that he didn't need and ended up hiring someone else to do the same thing and will probably deliver horrible work to the client at a loss. 

 

Not to mention, most of the time the client doesn't know it's not the freelancer doing the work, just like you said it's some rando.

Community Leader
Lisa B Member Since: Dec 29, 2015
13 of 16

"Funny that the job wasn't that cheap, $50 for 300 words, I originally proposed $80 but hey I can crank that out in about 30 minutes."

 

For a radio ad?  That's extremely cheap. In the copywriting world, even short audio and video scripts that are under 5 minutes are around $1,000 - $1500.  They're highly valued!  Longer scripts start at around $350 per minute. It's about the value your work brings clients, and shouldn't always be based on word count, like with blogs. 

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
14 of 16

Bradshaw S wrote:

 The more transactions Upwork gets, the more money they make. Over time will this profit outweigh the hit that they take from the slow degradation as dissatisfied clients and freelancers who had the misfortune to work with farmers leave the platform? Who knows.


I think this is more of an issue for clients than freelancers. Generally, a freelancer can avoid a farmer by not taking on low budget projects and having a reasonable hourly rate. All things being equal, the more the freelancer gets, the lower the profit margin for the farmer. I think it's harder for clients to spot farmers, because the successful ones have impressive looking work history, JSS, etc, and do not necessarily work for bargain basement rates. In theory, farmers who are Upwork freelancers must notify Upwork clients that they're using subcontractors, and subcontracting is only allowed on fixed price jobs, but who knows how that works out in practice.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
Melanie H Member Since: Nov 2, 2017
15 of 16

John K wrote:

Bradshaw S wrote:

 The more transactions Upwork gets, the more money they make. Over time will this profit outweigh the hit that they take from the slow degradation as dissatisfied clients and freelancers who had the misfortune to work with farmers leave the platform? Who knows.


I think this is more of an issue for clients than freelancers. Generally, a freelancer can avoid a farmer by not taking on low budget projects and having a reasonable hourly rate. All things being equal, the more the freelancer gets, the lower the profit margin for the farmer. I think it's harder for clients to spot farmers, because the successful ones have impressive looking work history, JSS, etc, and do not necessarily work for bargain basement rates. In theory, farmers who are Upwork freelancers must notify Upwork clients that they're using subcontractors, and subcontracting is only allowed on fixed price jobs, but who knows how that works out in practice.


^ I agree, especially the underlined/bolded (underlining and bolding are mine). That's just one reason of many not to totally undervalue yourself and/or take "I'm desperate" jobs.

 

OTOH, if the freelancer truly believes s/he is only worth a pittance, then s/he is probably in the wrong line of work. I just don't see the upside to taking the for-peanuts jobs here. (I do get that in some nations, a lower rate can buy much more, but even then there's a lower limit as to people taking on just plain awful jobs, and how that shows they value themselves and how they're ultimately treated.)

 

JMHO.

Highlighted
Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
16 of 16

John K wrote:

Bradshaw S wrote:

Really interesting how upwork allows farmers it seems like something that's very harmful to the clients, freelancers and platform as a whole


I agree with that assessment. And it can actually be in the farmers' interest to keep JSS down, so that their go-to freelancers have a hard time getting jobs from anyone else.


John, you're probably right. And I've noticed that anytime I have worked for another Upwork freelancer without being aware of it, their feedback was not that good. As if they took pleasure in hurting competitors.

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS