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Dealing with shady customers/clients - questions they ask on interviews then disappear

Active Member
Agustina G Member Since: Feb 17, 2018
11 of 17
Em no, I am not blaming upwork for this, I was asking for advice.

But thanks anyways. Smiley Happy
Community Guru
Scott B Member Since: Nov 20, 2015
12 of 17

@Agustina G wrote:
Em no, I am not blaming upwork for this, I was asking for advice.

But thanks anyways. Smiley Happy

 I gave you two paragraphs of advice. Sorry if it wasn't helpful. 

Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
13 of 17

@Scott B wrote:

@Agustina G wrote:
Em no, I am not blaming upwork for this, I was asking for advice.

But thanks anyways. Smiley Happy

 I gave you two paragraphs of advice. Sorry if it wasn't helpful. 


 It was a very thoughtful answer, Scott. Hopefully, it will be of benefit to another freelancer. 

Freelancers must be able to close the deal. 

Active Member
Agustina G Member Since: Feb 17, 2018
14 of 17
Yes, all answers have been helpful. But this also has nothing to do with me not being able to close a deal. The red flags are my responsibility to look out for, as stated above, but still, I didn't state that I'm not being able to close deals.

All has been solved everyone so thanks!
Community Guru
Scott B Member Since: Nov 20, 2015
15 of 17

@Agustina G wrote:
Yes, all answers have been helpful. But this also has nothing to do with me not being able to close a deal. The red flags are my responsibility to look out for, as stated above, but still, I didn't state that I'm not being able to close deals.

All has been solved everyone so thanks!

My response had nothing to do with "closing the deal" and everything to do with taking control of the interview process which is really where your problems are coming from.

 

Good luck. 

Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
16 of 17

"Closing the deal" means getting the client to offer you a contract that you find acceptable. So, this is absolutely and completely about closing the deal and Scott's advice was spot-on.

 

Don't think the rest of us haven't learned this the hard way, early in our respective careers. And it's something you have to learn through experience: how to demonstrate the capabilities and expertise you will deploy to solve the client's problem, without giving them the solution already. 

 

I had to partially re-learn it when I began working on UW, because I was accustomed to a consultative approach to my business wherein, if I had a chance to talk with a prospective client on the phone, I was already partway in the door. Here, a client can get you to hop on the phone when they have only invested a few minutes (if that), and it can be all too easy to let them pick your brain for free.

The interview is, or should be, a two-way street. You and the client are vetting each other to see if there's a good fit between what they need and can afford, and what you offer and will charge. Don't sell yourself short.

Community Guru
Scott B Member Since: Nov 20, 2015
17 of 17

@Phyllis G wrote:

"Closing the deal" means getting the client to offer you a contract that you find acceptable. So, this is absolutely and completely about closing the deal and Scott's advice was spot-on.

 

Don't think the rest of us haven't learned this the hard way, early in our respective careers. And it's something you have to learn through experience: how to demonstrate the capabilities and expertise you will deploy to solve the client's problem, without giving them the solution already. 

 

I had to partially re-learn it when I began working on UW, because I was accustomed to a consultative approach to my business wherein, if I had a chance to talk with a prospective client on the phone, I was already partway in the door. Here, a client can get you to hop on the phone when they have only invested a few minutes (if that), and it can be all too easy to let them pick your brain for free.

The interview is, or should be, a two-way street. You and the client are vetting each other to see if there's a good fit between what they need and can afford, and what you offer and will charge. Don't sell yourself short.


 

Very good points, Phyllis. I was initially thinking about this in terms of her immediate issue with clients taking advantage of her time. However, it is absolutely correct to indicate that the end of that advice means in way or the other, closing the deal. That is either in offering a contract or moving on. If the latter, far before you have given away the store. 

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