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Delivered hourly based work to client but he is not responding

Community Guru
Will L Member Since: Jul 9, 2015
11 of 25

No, Kashif.

 

Just don't use manual hours. Track all work time using Time Tracker and make sure your add notes that mean something to someone other than you, in case the client or Upwork contest your tracked time and reduce your billable hours to save themselves money.

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
12 of 25

Preston H wrote:

The client did not break any rules. You made a mistake  The client does not owe you money.


This, of course, is absolutely false. The client tricked you, and the client does owe you money. However, since you chose not to use the protections Upwork put in place to make sure this sort of thing doesn't happen, you can't get your money unless the client chooses to pay you.


I wouldn't let the client "enjoy a free blog post," though. If the client hasn't paid you,the client hasn't purchased the content, or any rights to use it. Remind the client that until you receive payment, he/she has no right to use the blog post. If you don't get paid and the client posts the content, you can file a DMCA takedown request. 

Community Guru
Martina P Member Since: Jul 11, 2018
13 of 25

I am puzzled how you obtained a job writing blog posts, as this seems to be outside the skill-set that you offer, or show in your portfolio. I find it strange that you are hired for something that you don't advertise, and if I were a very mistrustful person (I am) I would find that suspicious client behaviour. A sort of off-label use, if you will. 

So my theory is that client was up to no good from the start, but it also could be that he was unhappy with your work, and if that's the case, that's more on him than you, because you don't hire a butcher to bake you a cake. 

This is the kind of client that practically guarantees bad feedback, so consider yourself lucky he is not responding any more and close the contract as soon as is reasonable. 

Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
14 of 25

Martina P wrote:

I am puzzled how you obtained a job writing blog posts, as this seems to be outside the skill-set that you offer, or show in your portfolio. I find it strange that you are hired for something that you don't advertise, and if I were a very mistrustful person (I am) I would find that suspicious client behaviour. A sort of off-label use, if you will. 

So my theory is that client was up to no good from the start, but it also could be that he was unhappy with your work, and if that's the case, that's more on him than you, because you don't hire a butcher to bake you a cake. 

This is the kind of client that practically guarantees bad feedback, so consider yourself lucky he is not responding any more and close the contract as soon as is reasonable. 


It depends on the topic of the blog.

Community Guru
Martina P Member Since: Jul 11, 2018
15 of 25

Jennifer R wrote:

Martina P wrote:

I am puzzled how you obtained a job writing blog posts, as this seems to be outside the skill-set that you offer, or show in your portfolio. I find it strange that you are hired for something that you don't advertise, and if I were a very mistrustful person (I am) I would find that suspicious client behaviour. A sort of off-label use, if you will. 

So my theory is that client was up to no good from the start, but it also could be that he was unhappy with your work, and if that's the case, that's more on him than you, because you don't hire a butcher to bake you a cake. 

This is the kind of client that practically guarantees bad feedback, so consider yourself lucky he is not responding any more and close the contract as soon as is reasonable. 


It depends on the topic of the blog.


Just because you know a lot about a subject does not mean you can write well about it, IMO.

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
16 of 25

Martina P wrote:


Just because you know a lot about a subject does not mean you can write well about it, IMO.


On the other hand, if you don't understand a subject well, there is zero possibility that you can write about it well.

Ace Contributor
Kashif A Member Since: Dec 2, 2015
17 of 25

Actually I have provided content writing services before. If the client felt I have delivered lesser quality work, he should at least show some decency to reply back. However, if he is in for a free lunch - he can obviously have his way in this buyers' market.

 

The client is actively posting new jobs but not responding to me. So, he isn't a clueless first timer for sure.

Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
18 of 25

Kashif A wrote:

Actually I have provided content writing services before. If the client felt I have delivered lesser quality work, he should at least show some decency to reply back. However, if he is in for a free lunch - he can obviously have his way in this buyers' market.

 

The client is actively posting new jobs but not responding to me. So, he isn't a clueless first timer for sure.


I'm sorry, but I think it is absolute garbage to claim that Upwork is a "buyer's market" because you chose to not avail yourself of the protections the platform provides specifically to protect sellers. You made a choice and now are suffering the consequences. If the client did not pay you, report him. But don't claim that Upwork is biased against you simply because you made a risky business decision.  

Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
19 of 25

Kashif A wrote:

Hi all,

 

I am working on a task where the deliverables are blog posts. This is an hourly task. Initially the client has allowed manual submission of hours but since I have submitted first blog post, the client has turned off manual submission and stopped responding to my communication.

 

I have raised the issue to Upwork support and I was told that I should use the Desktop App to record hourly tasks - which means sharing my screen in form of screen captures. Since the client is not responding, I asked Upwork support to request the client to respond - nothing as yet.

 

I have delievered several blog posts to clients before and they were cool with manual submission of hours since writing a blog post requires research, writing and revisions and as I work with multiple clients at a time, it was not feasible to allow screen capture. 

When you are working on an hourly contract you can only work for one (1) client at a time. SInce you can only log time for one client it is no problem to use the UW-tracker.

 

Can the community let me know the way forward with this? Shall I end the contract and let the client enjoy a free blog post? What can I do to get my hard earned money from this unresponsive client?

If the clients uses your blog post without paying, have it taken down. If the client did not pay, you own the copyright.

 

Thanks


 

Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
20 of 25

I use manual time constantly. I use my own automated time tracker and once a week, I use that (and phone logs, as necessary) to roll up time sheets, then log hours on UW projects. I have never had a problem, which is not to say I never will. But I ALWAYS have a specific and comprehensive discussion with the client about it ahead of time. AND with new clients, I often log hours daily for the first couple of weeks, just to make sure they really do understand what we're doing and are comfortable with it. Also, I understand that with manually logged hours, I am completely on my own if the client decides they don't want to pay.

 

IMO it wasn't unreasonable to assume you could wait until the work was completed and log the hours all at once. But it was unwise, in the context of how UW payment protection covers you (and doesn't).  Also, never assume that a client is comfortable with manual hours just because it's enabled. Discuss it specifically and clearly (and be sure the conversation covers expectations about how many hours per week and/or per piece, and how unexpected overrurns will be handled).

 

As for what to do now: The client may have gone dark temporarily for reasons unrelated to this project, and will resurface. If that happens, you have the opportunity to request they pay you for this blog post in the form of a bonus; adn the two of you settle how things will work going forward. (Lots of writers here work for multiple clients and use the tracker, so I'm sure you can figure it out. Or you can decide not to.) Or the client is taking advantage of you nad has not intention of paying, in which case you may be able to retain ownership of what you wrote. I'm not sure about that, but others will weigh in.

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