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Re: Did I Take the Right Decision?

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
21 of 36

@husain A wrote:

Again, If you were a native Arab, you would be able to tell how poorly written that article was. I had known that all along, but kept it anyway. When Petra reminded me, I took a look and remembered right away—it was terrible. I absolutely agree with you: I'm not a native English speaker. I haven't set my English level to native nor have I planned to promise something to a client just to underdeliver. I will always make sure native (and nonnative) clients get their expectations straight. I will probably take such measures when things get a little bit more serious, a little bit more professional. I am, after all, an entry-level translator, right? Besides nonnatives don't typically have such standards, do they. Nevertheless, you needn't worry; I have done my homework and have some idea what I'm doing.


 I'm not a professional translator, but I'm pretty sure the English translation of this is "I understand that I am not qualified to translate into English, but have decided to do so anyway. Please don't concern yourself."

husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
22 of 36

@Tiffany S wrote:

 I'm not a professional translator, but I'm pretty sure the English translation of this is "I understand that I am not qualified to translate into English, but have decided to do so anyway. Please don't concern yourself."


 Not at all. I was referring to the source text. You really have no idea, and I'm not in the mood to explain myself, just take my word for it.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
23 of 36

@husain A wrote:

@Tiffany S wrote:

 I'm not a professional translator, but I'm pretty sure the English translation of this is "I understand that I am not qualified to translate into English, but have decided to do so anyway. Please don't concern yourself."


 Not at all. I was referring to the source text. You really have no idea, and I'm not in the mood to explain myself, just take my word for it.


 The source text doesn't really have anything to do with the fact that no one should be translating into a target language he doesn't speak at a native level. You've admitted that you don't have that level of fluency, and your posts demonstrate it, yet you defended and indicated the intention to continue translating into English.

husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
24 of 36

@Tiffany S wrote:

 The source text doesn't really have anything to do with the fact that no one should be translating into a target language he doesn't speak at a native level. You've admitted that you don't have that level of fluency, and your posts demonstrate it, yet you defended and indicated the intention to continue translating into English.


 Absolutely, I stand by what I said. Not all clients are looking for native English speakers, certainly not at this level. Like I said, I will consider these measures when things get a little bit more serious (take a look at my reply to Jennifer). I like it how you guys take your work seriously, but if you were in my shoes, with better English than many intermediate-level English Arabic translators on Upwork, you wouldn't be so surprised.

cupidmedia
Community Guru
Jennifer D Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
25 of 36

Husain, I'm a translation client and let me tell you frankly that Arabic is my least favorite language to hire for. Whenever I have listed an Arabic translation job I get absolutely inundated with very low quality proposals. There is a huge pool of people who speak Arabic in developing countries who try to find translation work here because they think they can speak Arabic so that's all the skills they need.

 

You may also find yourself at a disadvantage because you speak Lebanese Arabic. Most clients looking for an Arabic translator will be looking for someone to translate into Modern Standard Arabic. Even though I'm sure you can translate into MSA, most clients would be looking for someone from a specifically MSA country like Egypt or Saudi Arabia.

 

Your profile is pretty good. I think you need a stronger portfolio (as others have suggested). And make sure you focus on writing really excellent proposals to stand out from the horde of low-quality Arabic translators.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
26 of 36

I really love how you repeatedly tell people in this thread that they don't know what they're talking about.

 

By your own admission you are not a translator, have no experience, yet you decide you know better than clients and translators and freelancers with (between them) many decades of experience. You make statements anyone with experience in the industry knows for a fact to be abject nonsense.

 

Good luck to you. You'll need it with your "I know all there is to know about an industry I haven't a clue in" attitude.

 

Knowing two languages and believing that makes you a translator is like owning a scalpel and thinking that qualifies you to be a surgeon.

husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
27 of 36

@Petra R wrote:

 By your own admission you are not a translator, have no experience, yet you decide you know better than clients and translators and freelancers with (between them) many decades of experience. You make statements anyone with experience in the industry knows for a fact to be abject nonsense.

 

Good luck to you. You'll need it with your "I know all there is to know about an industry I haven't a clue in" attitude.


 I don't see anything wrong with that. I have repeatedly expressed my appreciation for your advices, but I think I have the liberty to make my own choices based on my own convictions. Also, when I said you (or anyone) don't have an idea what you're talking about, I meant that in relation to what I experienced sometime ago (something you couldn't have possibly witnessed). I probably should have given you a little background, but I was exhausted. I'm grateful to all of you and I mean no disrespect. 

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
28 of 36

@husain A wrote:

Petra R wrote: ......."I know all there is to know about an industry I haven't a clue in" attitude.

 I don't see anything wrong with that.


 OK Smiley Happy

 

Of course you have the right to do as you please.

husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
29 of 36

@Petra R wrote:

 OK Smiley Happy

 

Of course you have the right to do as you please.


 Yes, I am aware of the risks involved, thanks to you Smiley Happy. Messages can always come across as crude over the internet, but it was never my intention to offen anyone; I apologize if I have.

ottavinidesign
Ace Contributor
Davide O Member Since: Mar 24, 2017
BEST ANSWER
30 of 36

Did I read that right? 0.015/wd? Not 0.15/wd? Are fractions of a cent that common for beginner translators? That's pretty insane.

 

With that said, you have to be hypercritical about yourself sometimes, and realize your limitations.

I know it's easy to play the "I know everything and you have no idea about this whole thing" card, and I wouldn't blame you for using it...but at the same time, some things are on common-grounds for all fields of freelancing: If you're looking for premium payment, you have to offer premium services, and if you can't offer those, then you'll have to settle for something lower...just don't undersell yourself; You're not cheap, nobody wants to be cheap.

 

You should be well aware of how good you are in your field and let the client know that...and if he doesn't want to pay you the "correct" rate then, well, better luck next time...he'll probably find someone else to pay like a slave and receive a product that's fitting for that payment.

 

Just be honest and don't waste time uselessly questioning yourself about doing the right decision or whatever every-single-time. As long as a job is within your array of available skills, then you should still accept it and maybe discuss about the rates with your client.

 

Your case, for example: He said that 0.015 was his maximum, and since that was definitely out of question, you did the right thing by refusing, since it wasn't "on par" with your rates; You could try to "negotiate" a little longer, maybe by explaining in depth the benefits of your services compared to what he/she might find for that low price, out there...but sometimes it's better to let those clients go and move on.

The lower the pay, the riskier the job.

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