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Did I Take the Right Decision?

husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
11 of 36

No, it's not... They charge from less than a Cent (often a fraction of a Cent) to a Cent and think they died and have gone to heaven when they get offered two Cent a word. Take a look at jobs in the cheap languages, and often even the traditionally more lucrative ones.... Remember the German farmer who was farming out her jobs (which she won at under 2 Cent a word??)


Yeah, Upwork is drastically different from Proz when it comes to translation rates, apparently. My rate is more accurate than I thought, but still, I might have to be flexible. Especially, if being flexible is the only way to take on a project, these days.

husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
12 of 36

@Rene K wrote:

@husain A wrote:


I would normally charge $0.04 per word and that's based on some calculations I made; calculations that might be irrelevant to Upwork.


That's what entry and low-level translators charge on Upwork. Not saying it's wrong to charge such low rates, there are different markets on Upwork that cater for different type of clients. Also, while 10 cents a word is more in line with the industry standards, not everyone has the skills that match with those rates.

 

Whether you're fine with 1-4 cents per word is up to you. If you can get work for higher rates and work with more professional clients, do not hesitate. If you would rather focus on less demanding clients, there is a market for this. No one but you can tell what are the best business choices for you.


 I am an entry-level translator myself, with regard to my experience—not the level of quality I promise. I consider myself qualified enough to deliver accurate, natural-sounding translations, which is why I often catch myself sending proposals to jobs meant for intermediate-level translators. But none of that matters to most clients, I feel; they take note of the work history and job sucess scores when they're going through fifty proposals. I need to balance between how I see myself and how a client sees me, and adjust my rate accordingly.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
13 of 36

@husain A wrote:

@Rene K wrote:

@husain A wrote:


I would normally charge $0.04 per word and that's based on some calculations I made; calculations that might be irrelevant to Upwork.


That's what entry and low-level translators charge on Upwork. Not saying it's wrong to charge such low rates, there are different markets on Upwork that cater for different type of clients. Also, while 10 cents a word is more in line with the industry standards, not everyone has the skills that match with those rates.

 

Whether you're fine with 1-4 cents per word is up to you. If you can get work for higher rates and work with more professional clients, do not hesitate. If you would rather focus on less demanding clients, there is a market for this. No one but you can tell what are the best business choices for you.


 I am an entry-level translator myself, in regard to my experience—not the level of quality I promise. I consider myself qualified enough to deliver accurate, natural-sounding translations


 I have no idea what your translations into Arabic are like but you really, REALLY should not offer to translate into English under any circumstances.... based on your portfolio. Just don't. It will backfire. Really badly.

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
14 of 36

@husain A wrote:


 It's that bad? I might just take that one down.


Don't take it down. Stop translating into English before someone kills your JSS. Your English is very good, but it's not native. And you don't translate into a language if you don't have a native command of that language.

 

If you spend let's say decades in an English-speaking country, speaking only English, you can achieve native fluency, but you didn't.

 

Many, many people tend to overestimate their level in the foreign language(s) they speak. They don't realize that they don't sound as a native when they write. However, native speakers notice immediately.

 

You can make a client really mad one of those days and you'll be left wondering why your JSS is going down.

 

I understand the idea, like most of amateur translators you may be thinking: “why not translate both ways, it makes for more business opportunities?”

 

Well, think again…

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
15 of 36

Again, If you were a native Arab, you would be able to tell how poorly written that article was. I had known that all along, but kept it anyway. When Petra reminded me, I took a look and remembered right away—it was terrible. I absolutely agree with you: I'm not a native English speaker. I haven't set my English level to native nor have I planned to promise something to a client just to underdeliver. I will always make sure native (and nonnative) clients get their expectations straight. I will probably take such measures when things get a little bit more serious, a little bit more professional. I am, after all, an entry-level translator, right? Besides nonnatives don't typically have such standards, do they. Nevertheless, you needn't worry; I have done my homework and have some idea what I'm doing.

genericuser12345
Ace Contributor
Zak Y Member Since: Oct 24, 2017
16 of 36

The main question is how badly do you want the work. If you have no projects on the go and no really good prospects, it might be worthwhile to do a little low paying work in order to bring in a small amount of income as well as to practice and develop your skills. Personally, I would rather bring in some money rather than no money at all, so a lot depends on your personal situation, how many clients you have and whether or not you need the money. Then once you start to get some more jobs and have more work than you even want to be doing you can start only making offers for higher paying jobs or decline to continue with existing low paying customers. The worst thing for me is not to work for little money, but to have no work at all, and working even for a small salary is a good opportunity to hone your skills and develop more experience in your field.

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
17 of 36

@Zak Y wrote:

The main question is how badly do you want the work. If you have no projects on the go and no really good prospects, it might be worthwhile to do a little low paying work in order to bring in a small amount of income as well as to practice and develop your skills. Personally, I would rather bring in some money rather than no money at all, so a lot depends on your personal situation, how many clients you have and whether or not you need the money. Then once you start to get some more jobs and have more work than you even want to be doing you can start only making offers for higher paying jobs or decline to continue with existing low paying customers. The worst thing for me is not to work for little money, but to have no work at all, and working even for a small salary is a good opportunity to hone your skills and develop more experience in your field.


 _________________________

 

Here speaks a totally inexperienced "freelancer". You should not be "honing" skills on any client. You should already have the skills and experience in your field to ask to be paid for them. Do not work for little or no pay. Clients will see this and expect you to go on working at bottom-feeder prices. 

 

Zak, your advice is neither good nor helpful. 

husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
18 of 36

@Nichola L wrote: 
 You should not be "honing" skills on any client. You should already have the skills and experience in your field to ask to be paid for them. Do not work for little or no pay. Clients will see this and expect you to go on working at bottom-feeder prices.

That's exactly how I'm trying to operate, except I have a project for a work history. Judging from the way things work on Upwork, Unless a breakthrough happens, I'm going to be forced to accept lower rates when they're offered, eventually.

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
19 of 36

@Zak Y wrote:

(...) and working even for a small salary is a good opportunity to hone your skills and develop more experience in your field.


Great advice!

 

Everyone who wants a low JSS and unhappy clients should do what Zak suggested.

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
husainaa
Community Leader
Husain A Member Since: Sep 26, 2017
20 of 36

@Zak Y wrote:

. The worst thing for me is not to work for little money, but to have no work at all, 


 This. I will try to do things my way; however, if that doesn't work out, I'm gonna have to compromise.

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