67efc107
Member

Digital Freelancing Opportunities for refugees

Hi!  My name is Ghida and I am working on building a platform that automatically matches refugee talents to opportunities, including online freelancing opportunities provided through Upwork. in order to do so, I would appreciate having more info about the kind of opportunities (jobs/profiles) most requested by clients through Upwork. The goal is to train more refugees to perform jobs where there is clearly a lot of market demand. Also, I would like to know more about the legal requirements for freelancing kind of work. Is having a working visa a requirement? If so, Should the freelancer have a working visa in the country where the client is based? 

8 REPLIES 8
jmlaidlaw
Member

@ Ghida --  That's a noble idea, but do keep in mind that UpWork is not meant to be a training ground. Freelancers who provide services for UpWork clients are already quite skilled in their professional niches. Competition on this platform is fierce.

Thanks Janean for your feedback! I am aware of that. some refugees are highly qualified (they have the necessary work experience and education background). Others can be trained and can work on separate projects before joining upwork. My question mainly aims at knowing the type of freelancing jobs where there is the most demand to make sure that the training they are receiving is actually the right one (will maximize their chance of getting a freelancing job and being really good at it)

it is my understanding (from reading these forums for several years) that the jobs that are most in-demand are those that are most technical and highly specialized, and that require the greatest degree of education: for example, highly specialized CPA skills, specific types of advanced computer-based design and programming, medical diagnostics, legal drafts...

 

Any and all skills that can be learned/acquired easily or within the space of one-two-three years are flooded/oversaturated already. Even skills that require significant education (e.g., translation) are oversaturated.

 

Others may have different information, however -- and better advice to offer you.

I also think that refugees might do better in a work atmosphere where there is socialization.  Freelancing is not that at all.

What Mary says is definitely worth thinking about. The trades are always in demand -- and certainly a good tradesperson is worthy of respect. Carpentry, plumbing, elecrician-ing, auto mechanics, LPNs, CNAs, etc. (all of which take varying degrees of time to master) -- these are in-demand skills.

aocumen
Moderator
Moderator

Hi Ghida, 

 

To know which skills are currently in demand on Upwork, you may want to check the Upwork Skills Index, which is updated after every quarter. The link I included here notes the skills in demand on the third quarter of 2017. 

 

Regarding work visas, this is not necessary. However, be sure to check with legal/government institutions if you need to secure certain papers when freelancing on a specific country. For example, in the US, and if I remember correctly, in Singapore, you will need to secure a specific work visa to be able to work, even if it's online work. 


~ Avery
Upwork


@Avery O wrote:

 

Regarding work visas, this is not necessary. However, be sure to check with legal/government institutions if you need to secure certain papers when freelancing on a specific country. For example, in the US, and if I remember correctly, in Singapore, you will need to secure a specific work visa to be able to work, even if it's online work. 


 Avery,

 

Perhaps you meant “this is not required by Upwork”? As you go on to say, work visas are most certainly necessary in some—I would venture to say virtually all—countries that accept refugees.

Best,

Michael

I'm sorry my answer was kind of confusing, Douglas Michael. Thank you for flagging this.

 

A freelancer doesn't need to have a work visa in the country where the client is based. They will need to get advise from a legal adviser and clarify what kind of visa or permit they need to legally work in the country the freelancer is based in.


~ Avery
Upwork