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Do you bother applying/bidding at a higher rate than the client says is their budget?

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
11 of 24

@Andrea B wrote:

 


the client didn't even want to give me the original English text. I asked him for it. He just want me to check if the translation is flowing enough. So I just have to read 16000 words, and make some minor changes here and there if needed. I guess 3-4 hours are enough, given the fact is not a specialized text. But maybe I'm wrong and I'm going to make the worst mistake of my entire life...


 Have you seen the translation?

 

I have never, EVER (and I have been doing this for a very long time) seen a translation I could proofread 16000 words (PROPRLY) in 4 hours. And I am not slow, by any stetch of the imagination. Professional proofreaders tell me they manage a maximum of 1500 to 2000 words an hour when the text has already been professionally edited and is not technical.

 

Un-edited, or self-edited (by the translator) translated text, even at a very high level, is never like that.

There are very valid reasons why even the work produced by the highest level writers ideally goes to an editor and then a proofreader.

 

Do you remember the client I mentioned by the way? I thought it was the funniest co-incidence that with millions of freelancers and clients I would have proofread a text just yesterday that you translated (into Italian - I proofread the German version) last year. I have since figured out it was indeed the very same

 

 

and979
Community Guru
Andrea B Member Since: Feb 20, 2015
12 of 24

Do you remember the client I mentioned by the way? I thought it was the funniest co-incidence that with millions of freelancers and clients I would have proofread a text just yesterday that you translated (into Italian - I proofread the German version) last year. I have since figured out it was indeed the very same

Well ok, he doesn't pay too much, but he promised me a free trip to Dubai Smiley LOL

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
13 of 24

Andrea B wrote

 

But if you say so maybe I should really reconsider my rates - not only as a proofreader but as a translator too.


 I think you do ...

 

I believe you and I have worked for the same client.

 

You translated his tourist flyer into Italian for less than half (!) of what I just (yesterday) took to proofread (!) the German translation of what I suspect is the exact same flyer.....

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
14 of 24

haha I love when I get paid well after seeing that someone else made half of what I did. It's not really the client's fault at that point. It's the cheap provider.

 

Or then there are jobs that I don't really want so I bid high. Sometimes I get those. I figure the price makes up for what I can see will be a PITA customer.

 

My dad was a general contractor, so maybe I just got lucky learning certain things. When you don't know, bid high! When you have red flags, bid high! If you think the guy is gonna be a pain, bid high! This way, you can at least be happy with the money should you run into problems. We see so many people here QQ because of that PITA customer and they aren't getting paid anything. Well dummy you went low!

 

 

and979
Community Guru
Andrea B Member Since: Feb 20, 2015
15 of 24

Petra,

as you see I'm quite new on here, and I basically translate (and proofread) in my spare time. I have a full time job in a completely different field, but I wanted explore the possibility to get back to the 'old days' in which translations were enough for a living.

I had to start building my 'reputation' on Upwork, and the quickest method (for me, at least) was to start working with extremely low rates. I have already raised my rates a bit (just a bit), and I must convince myself that my rates are still too low.

And yes, as to the tourist flyer I'm pretty sure we're talking about the very same client...

christian1220
Community Leader
Cristian F Member Since: Jun 21, 2015
16 of 24

I started doing it recently and had some decent results. I think the difference between the client's budget and your bid is important. I mean it's one thing to bid $250 when the proposed budget is $150 and completly different thing to bid $1000 when the budget is $300.

 

Many projects are underated on Upwork. In my category I see a lot of clients who want WordPress websites for $50. I don't bother to apply but if they offer at least $150 I would go and ask for more.

 

I am working on this "strategy": I never explain myself why I bid more, instead I focus on the cover letter and try to make them respond. I try to cover more details and come up with better proposals. I think that when you're confident about doing great work you don't have to write a sentence and say it then move to another line. No, everything as a whole must give a sense of quality.

 

It's like when you spend money on something more expensive than the alternatives. They don't write on the label "hey, we're expensive because..." You just look at it and already know it's worth the extra money.

researchediting
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
17 of 24

Daniel,

 

Yes. Yes.

 

All the best,

Michael

iaabraham
Community Guru
Isabelle Anne A Member Since: May 19, 2014
18 of 24

I recently bid $50 for a $25 job (similar to your case). The client tried to get me to lower my price but I stuck to it. So he hired me without arguing further.

 

I completed the work, he was happy and left me 5 stars, mentioning in his feedback that it was worth paying more.

 

Clients who want quality work should be willing to pay for it, and these are the kinds of clients that you want to work with.

jmeyn
Community Guru
Joachim M Member Since: Mar 23, 2015
19 of 24

@Isabelle Anne A wrote:

 

 

Clients who want quality work should be willing to pay for it, and these are the kinds of clients that you want to work with.


 And, this are the clients that return with new business.

turbocro
Community Leader
Igor S Member Since: Apr 8, 2015
20 of 24

Budget really doesn't matter, sometime clients don't know actual value of job..

Few days ago I bid $600on job with $300 budget and won the bid, so it's only problem to explain client why your bid is way up from their original budget...

 

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