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Entering bid as fixed vs. hourly

Active Member
Leah M Member Since: Nov 9, 2018
1 of 18

Hi,

I'm fairly new though I've had several fixed-price jobs so far, and for the proposals, the field to enter the bid amount was obvious.

But when a potential client hasn't specified a fixed rate, I only have my hourly rate to show as my price. How do I enter a full amount such as $150 for the job? I can't find anything in settings that might give me the option.
However, I can see the bid range since I have the upgraded membership (high, average, low), so it seems others are bidding in lump sums as I would like to.

Help would be appreciated! So far I've mentioned the full estimate based on whatever, in my cover letter, but I'd rather not do that.

Thanks,

Leah

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Community Guru
Abdul R Member Since: Dec 4, 2014
2 of 18

Hi Leah, 

 

It's very easy and you always need to describe your estimated amount in the first few lines of your proposal in hourly job or even in the fixed price job. 

 

Best Regards,s

 

Abdul

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Active Member
Leah M Member Since: Nov 9, 2018
3 of 18

Thanks Abdul,

Glad to hear it's easy. But how is it done? 

Do you mean to say that if I place my estimated amount in my cover letter, the Upwork system will find that and place it with the other bids below the job post? (I don't think so).

So my rephrased question is: how do other freelancers enter a bid on a job post when the client has not specified fixed-price? (I only have a field for my hourly rate. I can change it for the job, but that's it.) I can see their bids in lump sums such as the high of $500 or the low of $30 and so on.

Leah

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Community Guru
Abdul R Member Since: Dec 4, 2014
4 of 18

Hi Leah, 

 

I think that it is not possible in an hourly job to place your bid as fixed price except the way you can mention your estimated amount in first few lines of your proposal. 

 

Yeah, some of the writers have different hourly rate up to or more than $ 100 per hour. 

 

Best Regards,

 

Abdul

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Active Member
Leah M Member Since: Nov 9, 2018
5 of 18

Hi Abdul,

OK, thanks. As I said in my reply below, it looks like the difference is when the client doesn't have a budget vs. when they do.

As for hourly rates, I just found one bid (on a job post with no budget specified), that's $400. That sounds about right for the entire job.

Well, I'll just add it to teh cover letter for now

Thanks!

Leah

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Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
6 of 18

!ONLY! fixed rate jobs have a budget.

Hourly jobs are charged, as the name suggests, by the hours you work and do not have a budget, so the amount in the field in question is the hourly rate.

It never makes sense to "mix" hourly and fixed rate contracts, it often ends in tears.


Either it is a fixed rate job or an hourly one.

If you don't want to work by the hour don't apply to hourly jobs or suggest to the client that your would prefer a fixed rate contract and should you be shosen you would prefer to be hored on a fixed rate basis, in which case your bid would be $ XXX.XX

 

In that cae the client can change any offer, should they wish to make one, to a fixed rate offer instead of an hourly one.

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Active Member
Leah M Member Since: Nov 9, 2018
7 of 18

Thank you, Petra, for your, um, empassioned response.
The problem is that I just now have noticed that, as I scroll down jobs, it says "fixed" or "hourly" on the left. I hadn't seen that before.

It's not that I don't want to work by the hour. I can work it out either way. But when the potential client asks "What would you charge to copyedit my 40,000 word book?" it requires some explaining.

Adding to that is the amounts in the other bids. No editor in his or her right mind is bidding $500/hour for proofreading or copyediting (but that's a bid I saw below an hourly job). Even $125/hr is extremely high.

I thought I was missing a field that I needed to activate, since I'm tech minded. I guess the answer to my question is to follow Abdul's advice about listing the project amount in the cover letter if asked for it. And I'll figure anyone trying to get $500 for copyediting is way out of the ballpark and probably missing a ball and a bat, too.

Thanks Smiley Happy

 

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Active Member
Rishma M Member Since: Mar 30, 2019
8 of 18

Hi Leah, 

The problem is that I just now have noticed that, as I scroll down jobs, it says "fixed" or "hourly" on the left. I hadn't seen that before.

 

I can't find above option. can you guide me as well please Smiley Happy

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Community Guru
Richard W Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
9 of 18

Rishma M wrote:

Hi Leah, 

The problem is that I just now have noticed that, as I scroll down jobs, it says "fixed" or "hourly" on the left. I hadn't seen that before.

 

I can't find above option. can you guide me as well please Smiley Happy


Hi Rishma. You've replied to an old discussion.

 

I don't know which "above option" you're referring to. If it's of any help, you cannot choose which type of bid to make to a proposal. If the job is posted as fixed price you must bid a fixed price. If it's posted as hourly you must bid an hourly rate.

 

However, in your cover letter you could explain that your bid is just a place-holder, and that you would actually like to work on the other basis, giving  the amount you would like to bid on that basis. If the client decides to hire you on that other basis, they can change the job type when they make you a job offer.

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Active Member
Leah M Member Since: Nov 9, 2018
10 of 18

I think screenshots will help. 

It looks like when a client has an estimated budget, the field allows entering a specific sum. When the client has no estimated budget, then the hourly rate automatically shows.

But, even when the client has no estimated budget, the bids (such as $200) are listed below the post. 

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