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Escrow protection is misleading

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Active Member
Tatevik G Member Since: Dec 23, 2012
11 of 19
Yah, I'm slowly gathering that there is no way to be protected unless you have $300 prepared for every possible problem. For all the percentage increases off of freelancers earnings, and now paid bidding, you'd think there would be some service included, since in most cases 20 minutes of investigation can be enough to which party is being scammed.
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Community Guru
Will L Member Since: Jul 9, 2015
12 of 19

Alexander,

 

No freelancer new to Upwork should add manual hours on an hourly contract and feel confident they will be paid for those hours..

 

It is completely irrelevant whether the client "agrees" to allow a freelancer to book manual hours - the client never has any obligation whatsover to every pay the freelancer for that time worked.

 

I have used manual hours occasionally, but only with clients I know and trust and in very specific circumstances.

 

 

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Ace Contributor
Mattie O Member Since: Jun 22, 2018
13 of 19
Client definitely had the upper hand. It’s frustrating to know that a client is given all the power. If a client doesn’t want to pay right or wrong, the case is even if you do get your money in the end, the client wins by being able to leave a bad private review unchecked.

Learned that I need to be very specific about the terms before accepting a offer on a fixed contract,
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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
14 of 19

Mattie O wrote:
Client definitely had the upper hand. It’s frustrating to know that a client is given all the power. If a client doesn’t want to pay right or wrong, the case is even if you do get your money in the end, the client wins by being able to leave a bad private review unchecked.

Learned that I need to be very specific about the terms before accepting a offer on a fixed contract,

It's probably frustrating when you don't know how to leverage the system, but the system in place gives a lot of power to freelancers actually. I think clients are at a disadvantage especially ones that don't want to lose their accounts. chargebacks are an issue but they lose their account when that happens. Aside from chargebacks, once you know how to work the system and see how it works, you'll see that freelancers have the advantage. 

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15 of 19
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Clients only get the upper hand if the freelancer doesn't take control of their business and not give away their power.

Still, nothing is 100% here.
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Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
16 of 19

Cairenn R wrote:
Clients only get the upper hand if the freelancer doesn't take control of their business and not give away their power.

Still, nothing is 100% here.

Or anywhere else.

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Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
17 of 19

But Upwork charges fees! It's an outrage. 

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Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
18 of 19

Mattie O wrote:
Client definitely had the upper hand. It’s frustrating to know that a client is given all the power. If a client doesn’t want to pay right or wrong, the case is even if you do get your money in the end, the client wins by being able to leave a bad private review unchecked.

Learned that I need to be very specific about the terms before accepting a offer on a fixed contract,

Clients aren't really given any power. Upwork simply does a bit less to protect freelancers than some freelancers expect or think it should.

 

I happen to agree that fixed price "protection" is completely useless to the freelancers who need it most, and wish that Upwork made it clearer that you have no real protection unless you're willing and able to pony up $291. That said, Upwork isn't GIVING the client any power--if you were working directly with a client off platform, you'd be in exactly the same position; the only way you could force the client to pay you would be to pay to file a lawsuit.

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Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
19 of 19

re: "if you were working directly with a client off platform, you'd be in exactly the same position; the only way you could force the client to pay you would be to pay to file a lawsuit."

 

...The filing of which would not actually force a client to do anything, and if it ran its course, whatever the outcome, it could cost more in legal fees than most Upwork contracts are worth.

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