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Fixed Price Job and bids

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
11 of 15

@Kristi B wrote:
I'm also a newbie and i have a similar question. If it's a fixed price job with a budget of $10, I just assumed I was supposed to bid $10 for my earnings. You mean that someone else can lowball that number and take the job? I thought fixed price meant that the rate was fixed at whatever the posting states. Is that why I'm not getting any jobs? Is it the norm to bid less than the stated fixed price? I'm trying to get my first gig on here. Thank you for any guidance!

Fixed price simply means that you'll be paid a flat rate for completing the job, rather than paid by the hour.

 

That is not the reason that you are not getting jobs. Clients take many factors into account when selecting a freelancer, not just price. I (and many other established freelancers) routinely bid more than the stated budget for a fixed price job, and we often get those jobs in spite of there being much lower bids.

 

Cutting your rate to attempt to get your first job is a trap. It will land you a client you don't want and establish a public record of working for peanuts, which may impact your future jobs.

 

Bid what you're worth on jobs that you're well qualified for and don't worry about what others are doing. 

hlaine
Active Member
HOLLY L Member Since: Mar 24, 2016
12 of 15

This thread was very helpful, but I'm still unsrue of what to bid.  I've been picking the entry level jobs and have it unlocked so I can see what people are biding.  I was dumb and landed one job writing articles for super cheap, but I figured this would be a way to at least get something in my portfolio. 

jaybopp82
Community Leader
Jason B Member Since: Jan 3, 2020
13 of 15

Every job I've gotten was because I bid (for fixed price) the suggested amount that was displayed on the job, if I was comfortable with the work they are asking for and the pay amount they suggested.  For hourly, I just pick a rate I'm happy with and go with it.  I don't low ball; I think it drives clients away assuming the work won't be good.  I'm still newish, but wanted to share my opinion on this.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
14 of 15

Jason B wrote:

Every job I've gotten was because I bid (for fixed price) the suggested amount that was displayed on the job, if I was comfortable with the work they are asking for and the pay amount they suggested.  For hourly, I just pick a rate I'm happy with and go with it.  I don't low ball; I think it drives clients away assuming the work won't be good.  I'm still newish, but wanted to share my opinion on this.


Many (perhaps most) of my fixed price jobs resulted from bids significantly higher than the posted budget. I know many others here who have had similar experiences. 

feed_my_eyes
Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
15 of 15

HOLLY L wrote:

This thread was very helpful, but I'm still unsrue of what to bid.  I've been picking the entry level jobs and have it unlocked so I can see what people are biding.  I was dumb and landed one job writing articles for super cheap, but I figured this would be a way to at least get something in my portfolio. 


It definitely takes some experience to learn how to scope a fixed price project, but I don't think you should be too influenced by what other people are bidding, since a lot of them don't know any more than you do. On every project, there will be experienced freelancers who bid higher and newbies who bid lower, and since you can't see what the people with your own level of experience are bidding, the data isn't helpful, IMO. And don't be intimidated into just going along with the client's budget; they often have no idea either, plus if you can make a good case for being hired (and if you can't make a good case, then you shouldn't bid in the first place), then they'll be willing to pay more.

 

It takes practice, but I think that there are way, way, WAY more freelancers who underbid rather than overbid, so when in doubt, go up rather than down. And make sure to ask the client questions before you accept a project, and adjust your bid if necessary; the price that you quote in your proposal doesn't have to be set in stone.

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