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Hmmm

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Community Guru
Suzanne N Member Since: Aug 15, 2012
21 of 43

@John T wrote:

"I doubt they really care how any of us feel or how it impacts any of us all the changes, and neglect to update us on any of the changes.

 

It just shows me more and more they don't care and want to rid Upwork of anyone who they don't want to be bothered with."

 

I think that's a given. This is a work marketplace, not a social club or a support group.

 

I don't mean to seem harsh or indifferent to people's woes, and I think there are any number of things that Upwork could, and should, do better. But if you're disappointed that the place is a business that's only interested in you for your monetary value, well, I think that's the feeling of shedding a useless delusion.

 

I don't think that makes Upwork useless, or bad, or a let down. I didn't expect any more of it.

I think it does a rather good job, as it happens. But that's because I don't expect it to be a nurturing best pal. Indeed, I think that would be too much to ask. It's a work marketplace. That's it.

This is what freelancing is. There are no retirement presents or people bringing cakes to the office on your birthday. There's no office. You don't have a job. You're a freelancer.

 

On a slight tangent, I notice people talk about "leaving" a lot. I don't get that. You're not under any exclusive contract here. You're a freelancer. You don't need to quit. Indeed, you can't. Because you're not employed here. You're a freelancer.

 

 


John.

 

No one is expecting Upwork to be someone's best friend or give out prizes.. But one does expect some respect for the work put in to Upwork for the money they do make. I for one don't care aymore but your stinking attitude just shows you either work for Upwork or you like stirring the pot. So I really could care less what you think.

 

There are a lot of people affected by Upworks lack of professionalism. All anyone is asking for is that. 


As far as exclusive contract, Upwork for many has a 24 month clause so some especially long term contractors are sadly yes under a contract and stuck here till they can take their clients elsewhere.

 

So Please don't give those greive that really have an issue with being walked all over.

 

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Community Guru
Fergus M Member Since: May 23, 2015
22 of 43

"This is what freelancing is."

 

No, it isn't. Freelancers don't compete for coloured badges; freelancers don't have their proposals randomly hidden by some brainless algorithm; freelancers get to submit professional bids for jobs instead of being forced to answer ridiculous and irrelevant questions about their favourite pet.

 

I am a freelancer. All I want Upwork to do is let me find clients and offer them my services, then give my my **bleep** money as soon as I've earned it.

 

If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.― George Orwell
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Community Guru
Setu M Member Since: Jan 26, 2014
23 of 43

@John T wrote:

But if you're disappointed that the place is a business that's only interested in you for your monetary value, well, I think that's the feeling of shedding a useless delusion.

 


John,

ST(very_strong_word)U. If Upwork was interested in our monetary value, the platform would actually work so that clients would stop leaving this place.

 

I doubt you know this, but some persons here are actually worth more than others - Suzanne is one of them.

 

I'll accept the blame for this post.

---- easy like Sunday morning ----
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Ace Contributor
Tim H Member Since: Jul 7, 2015
24 of 43

You may be technically correct, but when we "leave" we take with us (many of us), tens of thousands per year in fees they have been earning on our backs.

When we "leave" we take the 10% with us.

Get it?

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Community Leader
Patrick P Member Since: Jun 17, 2015
25 of 43

If Upwork resembled a business right now, I'd be thrilled.

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Community Guru
Stephen B Member Since: Dec 4, 2012
26 of 43

"I think it does a rather good job, as it happens. But that's because I don't expect it to be a nurturing best pal. Indeed, I think that would be too much to ask. It's a work marketplace. That's it."

 

a) No one expects it to be a nurturing best pal; but neither did they expect it to turn into a self-obsessed backstabbing traitor.

 

b) it's not a work marketplace. It used to be. It's become a micro-managing corporate sweatshop.

 

**Analogy alert**Say it was a marketplace. A real one, with barrows, fruit stalls and all. Arthur Fowler has been there for years selling his fruit and veg. Life is hard work but good. And he is renowned for the quality of his fruit and veg.

 

Then a new market manager is appointed. Within a year:

 

He (or she) starts randomly taking away the signs that point to the stalls. Arthur is sitting in his stall at one end of the market with no way of knowing whether the supervisor has moved his sign or not.

 

He turns up every day and sticks up a new sign (that only he has the key to) over Arthur's stall. It keeps changing but he won't tell Arthur why. One day it's "Arthur's excellent premium fruit and veg" - and the next it's "Arthur's quite good fruit and veg". And he dreads the day when he'll turn up and the sign will say "Arthur's really rancid fruit and veg".

 

He starts telling Arthur what shape his bananas have to be, and how many grapes in a bunch.

 

He keeps sending people to Arthur asking for steaks and pork chops, and he penalises Arthur if he doesn't treat them all with the utmost courtesy, even though the sign above his stall clearly says "Fowler's Fruit and Veg."

 

The he introdces a quota system whereby Arthur can only serve a fixed number of people in a day. Big problem is, even if they come up to him and ask for brown shoe polish or a little porcelain dog, or get him to weigh out a lovely bag of plums before telling him they haven't got any money, it still counts as one of his customers for the day.

 

He introduces rules for cleaning up around the stalls, especially since customers are prone to throw down their apple cores and orange peels when they've finished them (despite Arthur having provided two large bins next to his stall). The problem is, Arthur isn't allowed to do the cleaning up himself, as he'll be penalised and moved to a bad pitch away from the crowd if he's seen to be cleaning up too much. He has to tell the customers to clean up their own mess (even if by now they've left the market and have gone to the big supemarket for the rest of their goodies). Whenever he sells someone a bag of apples, he has to say "There you go my darling - best apples in town. Don't forget to thow the cores in a bin when you're done with them, Princess." And if it turns out that they went round the corner and threw down their apple cores, he has to try and chase them through the streets to ask them to lift up the cores themselves, despite the fact that he should be at his stall selling fruit and veg.

 

One day, when Arthur's at his lowest ebb, the manager gets his team to come in at 5AM before opening, clean up the whole floor around the market, and empty the bins all over Arthur's stall. Arthur doesn't know anything about this until he comes in to open up. He spends all day frantically trying to find out what's going on; and at 5PM just before closing, the market inspector's assistant turns up to tell him that they're sorry, they didn't realise throwing the rubbish all over Arthur's stall would affect him so badly; and that they'd started working on putting in place measures to tell him in the future when they were going to dump the rubbish on his stall.

 

Oh, and that despite these concerns, it was possible that Arthur might be be moved down to the very end of the market next week and have his signs taken away for failing to keep his stall clean. But it's possible that might not happen.

 

And Arthur sits down, has a cup of coffee, and thinks back to the day when he worked in a marketplace.

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Ace Contributor
Paul M Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
27 of 43

Stephen, that is absolute genius.

 

I'm glad you stopped before Arthur stole the Christmas Club money to make ends meet, mind you Smiley Wink

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Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
28 of 43

Arfur's son went to my school, he was an arrogant little twerp Cat Very Happy

 

 

 

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Community Guru
Krisztina U Member Since: Aug 7, 2009
29 of 43

@Stephen B wrote:

"I think it does a rather good job, as it happens. But that's because I don't expect it to be a nurturing best pal. Indeed, I think that would be too much to ask. It's a work marketplace. That's it."

 

a) No one expects it to be a nurturing best pal; but neither did they expect it to turn into a self-obsessed backstabbing traitor.

 

b) it's not a work marketplace. It used to be. It's become a micro-managing corporate sweatshop.

 

**Analogy alert**Say it was a marketplace. A real one, with barrows, fruit stalls and all. Arthur Fowler has been there for years selling his fruit and veg. Life is hard work but good. And he is renowned for the quality of his fruit and veg.

 

Then a new market manager is appointed. Within a year:

 

He (or she) starts randomly taking away the signs that point to the stalls. Arthur is sitting in his stall at one end of the market with no way of knowing whether the supervisor has moved his sign or not.

 

He turns up every day and sticks up a new sign (that only he has the key to) over Arthur's stall. It keeps changing but he won't tell Arthur why. One day it's "Arthur's excellent premium fruit and veg" - and the next it's "Arthur's quite good fruit and veg". And he dreads the day when he'll turn up and the sign will say "Arthur's really rancid fruit and veg".

 

He starts telling Arthur what shape his bananas have to be, and how many grapes in a bunch.

 

He keeps sending people to Arthur asking for steaks and pork chops, and he penalises Arthur if he doesn't treat them all with the utmost courtesy, even though the sign above his stall clearly says "Fowler's Fruit and Veg."

 

The he introdces a quota system whereby Arthur can only serve a fixed number of people in a day. Big problem is, even if they come up to him and ask for brown shoe polish or a little porcelain dog, or get him to weigh out a lovely bag of plums before telling him they haven't got any money, it still counts as one of his customers for the day.

 

He introduces rules for cleaning up around the stalls, especially since customers are prone to throw down their apple cores and orange peels when they've finished them (despite Arthur having provided two large bins next to his stall). The problem is, Arthur isn't allowed to do the cleaning up himself, as he'll be penalised and moved to a bad pitch away from the crowd if he's seen to be cleaning up too much. He has to tell the customers to clean up their own mess (even if by now they've left the market and have gone to the big supemarket for the rest of their goodies). Whenever he sells someone a bag of apples, he has to say "There you go my darling - best apples in town. Don't forget to thow the cores in a bin when you're done with them, Princess." And if it turns out that they went round the corner and threw down their apple cores, he has to try and chase them through the streets to ask them to lift up the cores themselves, despite the fact that he should be at his stall selling fruit and veg.

 

One day, when Arthur's at his lowest ebb, the manager gets his team to come in at 5AM before opening, clean up the whole floor around the market, and empty the bins all over Arthur's stall. Arthur doesn't know anything about this until he comes in to open up. He spends all day frantically trying to find out what's going on; and at 5PM just before closing, the market inspector's assistant turns up to tell him that they're sorry, they didn't realise throwing the rubbish all over Arthur's stall would affect him so badly; and that they'd started working on putting in place measures to tell him in the future when they were going to dump the rubbish on his stall.

 

Oh, and that despite these concerns, it was possible that Arthur might be be moved down to the very end of the market next week and have his signs taken away for failing to keep his stall clean. But it's possible that might not happen.

 

And Arthur sits down, has a cup of coffee, and thinks back to the day when he worked in a marketplace.


Very well put, Stephen. I know it must read like a gross exaggeration to visitors and newbies because it defies logic and common sense, but the sad reality is, it's absolutely not. It's the welcome to Upwork story.

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Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
30 of 43

There's a difference between being pragmatically objective and destroying people's livelihoods for no logical reason. What everyone wanted was just for them to take their 10% and largely leave people alone to get on with it.

 

Incidentally, I am fairly sure I remember the moderators saying at one point to leave absent contracts open in case of damage to JS score.

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