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gajendradewra
Member

How client see a job History: Does it make difference if one have many small paid jobs vs high

Well, my concern is to make an awesome profile, for future. 

 

So I wonder, how the client sees profile of freelancers,  I do have few cases I am thinking what to go with, as follows:

 

1- Having only hourly contracts in my job history, (of course I will increase rate with the time)

2- Having hourly and fixed but fixed must be high paid (at least 100+)

3- Hourly and Fixed, Hourly with an increase in rate over time, and Fixed small paid or high paid whatever I get.

 

 

 

Edit 1: My profile link, since it is not set public I think you won't be able to see it

10 REPLIES 10
petra_r
Member

I would strongly suggest you change your overview and make it about what you can do for clients and your strengths and unique selling points rather than that completely irrelevant set of stats...

 

Clients want to see a profile that tells them what they're buying and how well the freelancer did for other clients. That's it.

 

Clients also only see the first line or two in the list view, so you waste that VITAL space by repeating what the client already knows (Your name and essentially your tagline) instead of telling them why you are the right person for their job.

 

I am fairly sure it doesn't matter if you have mixed small and big contracts. Clients can order your history anyway.

 

But honestly, scrap your overview and start from scratch...

 

 

 


@Petra R wrote:

I would strongly suggest you change your overview and make it about what you can do for clients and your strengths and unique selling points rather than that completely irrelevant set of stats... 


Thanks for pointing this out as well, I made instant changes as well as I will refine them.


@Gajendra D wrote:

@Petra R wrote:

I would strongly suggest you change your overview and make it about what you can do for clients and your strengths and unique selling points rather than that completely irrelevant set of stats... 


Thanks for pointing this out as well, I made instant changes as well as I will refine them.


 Much better! Now proofread it and fix the grammar and don't start so many sentences with "Or" but YES!! Much better indeed, you got the idea.

 

I stumble over :

 

Working on setting up 750 products to a Shopify store, including their different color variants, SKU, product details all taken from AliExpress.

 

You know there is something called copyright?


@Jennifer R wrote:

I stumble over :

 

Working on setting up 750 products to a Shopify store, including their different color variants, SKU, product details all taken from AliExpress.

 

You know there is something called copyright?


I study copyright, trademark and patent laws, back in 2011-12 while I was doing Company Secretary Course. I also have practical knowledge of patent because I have to consider it while I was working as Product designer past 3.5 years. Now, there is a word, 'Dropshipping' which kinda applies here.

 

You're right, I ask the same to my client and he told me Aliexpress is made for people to supply products to their customer via drop shipping, so obviously it is needed to choose same product, same image, same description while you sell something on your store and which going to supply by some big manufacturer or bla bla... 

 

Do search on dropshipping, you might start selling via your own online store after that 🙂

 

But also, since the majority of people will thinks its fraud I will remove the word download from Aliexpress, as who deals in that already knows and otherwise it makes a negative impact, thanks for pointing out that.

cupidmedia
Member

As a client, when I look at your job history, I want to see your reviews and ratings. Those are the most important things. There's only a couple of scenarios where I would care about whether you do fixed or hourly jobs and your rates:

 

1) If the type of job I'm hiring for is very different to what you usually do. E.g. If I'm looking for someone to do a very large hourly project, and you've only done small fixed price projects, I might be concerned about whether you can work in that format, and I'd probably ask you about it (but it wouldn't be a dealbreaker)

2) If you say your hourly rate is $40/hr, but you have a long history of $5/hr jobs, that's going to be a red flag for me too. Of course, if I can see there's been a steady increase in your rate over time, or if you say your rate is $40/hr but most of your jobs are $35/hr, then I'm not going to care.


@cupidmedia wrote:

 

1) If the type of job I'm hiring for is very different to what you usually do. E.g. If I'm looking for someone to do a very large hourly project, and you've only done small fixed price projects, I might be concerned about whether you can work in that format, and I'd probably ask you about it (but it wouldn't be a dealbreaker)


 

This gives me some hint, so I think I am going to stay with option first, (only hourly) since I myself looking for long-term jobs, the client will see and understand quickly that people working with this guy, for long-term jobs mean he's more trustworthy and skilled. 

 

 

I think its a good idea to do at least a couple of jobs in each format so you understand the differences and how to handle the different types of contracts and what they mean for you (in terms of things like e.g. cashflow, timekeeping, etc). Then you're prepared for anything. I have had one situation where I had to turn down a freelancer and go with my second choice, because they didn't know how to do an hourly contract and didn't want to learn and told me I'd have to switch to a fixed price contract instead.

 

(Note: I know that some freelancers have a strong preference for one format over the other. That's perfectly fine. But I still believe that all freelancers should know the ins and outs of both contract types, so they're making an informed decision.)

Well, I have gone through both types, I have done 135 Jobs and 605 Hours (So I did mostly fix). and I am okay with both types.

 

Now, my concern is that fixed jobs, in my skills set are not long-term, so I need to search clients every month/week. I am looking for long-term relationship, that's why I completely devoting myself with hourly, no matter client looking for one week or for 2 months. because I found if that 'one week' client satisfied (which he will with me) then he will call me again in future for sure, for any VA task he will have even for 2 hours or 20 hours.

 

I feel, with hourly contract, I get more attached to clients then fixed one. Fixed one tends to get a one-time solution and forget but hourly clients keep in mind for future.

 

 

Edit 1: My profile link, since it is not set public I think you won't be able to see it

Yeah, you have a good mix.

 

I think to an extent you're right about building relationships through hourly contracts. All of my regular long-term freelancers are on hourly contracts. But I do have several freelancers I work with less frequently that I always work on fixed contracts with, who I've been working with for more than two years. A fixed price contract isn't necessarily always a one-off.