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How do i accept work from someone who already left me imperfect feedback?

2a05aa63
Community Guru
Viacheslav K Member Since: Sep 9, 2015
21 of 26

The thing that you call "great" I call "mediocore". In freelancing, your "mediocore that includes barely finishing something" doesn't slide. Just look at all the "I'm leaving because no one hires me" post around here.

Doing your job on the agreed requirements with a little extra is enough to get a 5 star rating. If a client don't even explain why they put a lower score, like the OP's feedback - is not ok. You don't have to sacrifice a kidney or hire a psychic to solve your clients secret problems to mantain a 100% JSS. 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
22 of 26

Viacheslav K wrote:

The thing that you call "great" I call "mediocore". In freelancing, your "mediocore that includes barely finishing something" doesn't slide. Just look at all the "I'm leaving because no one hires me" post around here.

 

Well, this is what you said: "5 start should be a default rating for a completed job without any unresolved conflicts."

That's pretty much the definition of mediocre. 


Doing your job on the agreed requirements with a little extra is enough to get a 5 star rating.

 

So, then, what rating do you think exceptional freelancers should get. Do you really think that freelancers who inched above the requirements and freelancers who turned in a stellar performance should be rated exactly the same? 

 

If so, why? 

 

As a long-time freelancer, I don't feel like I've earned five stars across the board unless I'm one of the best freelancers the client has worked with. Sure, some things like "meets deadlines" are pretty much yes or no questions. But quality? Skills? Big range.

 

I'm a writer, so I'm going to use an example from that arena. Imagine that a client hires three people to write different blog posts for his website. One post is fine--doesn't excite him much but it gets the job done and he uses it. The second is higher quality than many he's seen and he puts that writer in reserve for the future. The third is such a great piece of content that he decides to build a social media campaign around it, gives the freelancer a bonus, and immediately comes up with another assignment for that freelancer at a higher rate because he wants to make sure he keeps her.

 

Under your system, those three freelancers would get identical ratings. Hard to see how that's good for anyone except the mediocre freelancer. 


 

2a05aa63
Community Guru
Viacheslav K Member Since: Sep 9, 2015
23 of 26

Tiffany S, I don't agree with you. Working on edge like you have to be better than anyone must be very hard.

Exceptional freelancers increase their hourly rate. But 5$ per hour and 200$ per hour just need to do their job. 

Example: you want to get some coffee. You can get it at McDonald's or at the most expensive coffee shop in town. If you get the coffee and it's fine - that's it. Of course the expensive one will be better most of the time. But you can't bash McDonald's for not being the same, giving them a bad review. You paid 10 time less for it.

I think, overworking yourself is just a way to compensate for not making the main job good enough or not being confident in your skills. Because if it's darn well done you don't need to do anything more.

feed_my_eyes
Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
24 of 26

Tiffany S wrote:

Viacheslav K wrote:

5 start should be a default rating for a completed job without any unresolved conflicts. 


In other words, Passable = Perfect and there is no means to distinguish outstanding work? 

 


That train has already left the station. "Top rated" just means "average", and anything less than a 90% JSS is the end of the world as we know it.

a_lipsey
Community Guru
Amanda L Member Since: Jan 23, 2018
25 of 26

Christine A wrote:

Tiffany S wrote:

Viacheslav K wrote:

5 start should be a default rating for a completed job without any unresolved conflicts. 


In other words, Passable = Perfect and there is no means to distinguish outstanding work? 

 


That train has already left the station. "Top rated" just means "average", and anything less than a 90% JSS is the end of the world as we know it.


It's not though, because I just lost TR (which I will gain back shortly ) and I'm still getting job invites. It's not the life-ending situation people think it is. Does it affect business? Sure. My invites are a little down. So I might send some proposals and spend a few connects instead. But  having your JSS take a hit isn't  going to kill you.  Just like in the real world, one bad review on Yelp won't kill you either. 

jaybopp82
Community Leader
Jason B Member Since: Jan 3, 2020
26 of 26

This recently happened to me.  I had all 5 star reviews and still do, but noticed my "client who recommend" dropped 10%.  Although one of my clients left 5 stars, they marked me negatively on something I'll never know about.  My JSS will drop and my 100% is gone forever.  It's a hard pill to swallow and it took a bit to get over it, but I did.  I'll continue working and doing my best.

It just would've been nice if that client would have let me know how I could improve.  I'd be more than happy to work on improving, but I don't know what went wrong.

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