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Re: How do we see the bids made by the other freelancers?

optimizedwales
Active Member
Michael P Member Since: Oct 17, 2019
1 of 24

I have  just upgraded to Freelancer Plus which states that I can  'View competitor bids for any job'.

 

Where can I view this information ?

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
2 of 24

Noureldin Y wrote:

https://www.upwork.com/ab/plans/membership/change-plan

buy the $15 plan.


Which part of "I have just upgraded to Freelancer Plus"  was in any way too complicated for you to comprehend?

wescowley
Community Guru
Wes C Member Since: May 3, 2019
3 of 24

You'll see a range of bids at the bottom of the job post.  You won't see individual bids.

bid range.JPG

optimizedwales
Active Member
Michael P Member Since: Oct 17, 2019
4 of 24
Thank you for you fast feedback

wlyonsatl
Community Guru
Will L Member Since: Jul 9, 2015
5 of 24

Michael,

 

Unfortunately, all Upwork will allow you to see is the maximum, minimum and average bids already placed on a project. This can be better than no information at all, but it's far less than useful than what Upwork's predecessor Elance used to provide, including pricing details on ALL proposals and then identifying which proposal actually was accepted by the client. (If the high and low bids are both outliers from the majority of the proposals, then neither they nor the average are useful information.)

 

This much more detailed information was an especially big help to new freelancers who wanted to understand the common and successful freelancer pricing in their niche, but I've been on Elance/Upwork for a few years and would still like to know when price has probably played a role when my proposal has't won a new project.

 

florydev
Community Guru
Mark F Member Since: Jul 10, 2018
6 of 24

Will L wrote:

This much more detailed information was an especially big help to new freelancers who wanted to understand the common and successful freelancer pricing in their niche, but I've been on Elance/Upwork for a few years and would still like to know when price has probably played a role when my proposal has't won a new project.

 


Will, I am curious, what would you do with that information?  I can see in the abstract that it would be nice to have it but when I start down the road of what action I would take because of it I am drawing a blank.  

wlyonsatl
Community Guru
Will L Member Since: Jul 9, 2015
7 of 24

Hi, Mark.

 

I would do the same thing with that information that any smart business owner does in an open and transparent market, which includes getting an understanding of where my standard proposal rates for different types of work stand compared to my competitors and occasionally testing different pricing to see if my win rates change within the core range of competitive pricing I can see in my Upwork niche.

 

I've consulted with and advised hundreds of companies in a wide variety of industries during my career and not a single one didn't care what their competitors were charging for their products and services. In a market as competitive as Upwork, flying blind on competitors' pricing is a big disadvantage for freelancers who want to try to find the right balance between charging higher prices and winning enough bids to make whatever level of earnings they desire.

 

I assume this is especially a problem for new freelancers who also have no experience in the offline economy, meaning they really have no clue when they start out what pricing competition they face.

 

It is to Upwork's advantage that freelancers maximize their pricing, which would also increase Upwork's fee income (it's biggest revenue source). So, it isn't obvious why Upwork doesn't provide this more detailed pricing information. Maybe Upwork thinks higher pricing would reduce the number of clients relying on Upwork freelancers for work done at below-market prices? I don't know.

florydev
Community Guru
Mark F Member Since: Jul 10, 2018
8 of 24

Oh sure, they collect the data, companies collect lots of data obsessively.  

 

But I am not sure this particular data, at least for me, would be actionable.  That someone one a bid at less than me, what does that tell me I should have done differently?  I have no information about what they said and how they said it, so am I to assume it was only because I was cheaper?   If I make that assumption, what do I do as a result?

optimizedwales
Active Member
Michael P Member Since: Oct 17, 2019
9 of 24
Hi Guys,

I really appreaciate the detailed replies.

As someone that is new to Upwork, I am trying to gauge the rate that is
likely to be successful.

The range is a help but at this time will have to learn from trial and
error.

Regards,

Mike

florydev
Community Guru
Mark F Member Since: Jul 10, 2018
10 of 24

Michael P wrote:
As someone that is new to Upwork, I am trying to gauge the rate that is
likely to be successful.

The range is a help but at this time will have to learn from trial and
error.


Michael, and what I am discussing with Will almost as an aside is I am not sure that information would actually be helpful for you.  At some point you have to decide what a rate is and by trial and error you will figure out if it works.  I don't believe there is a shortcut or a work around what you will find is as you look at other people's rates you will think, that is too low or that is too high.

 

In my opinion, rates are variable because the offering's we each have are almost entirely unique.  I can't speak broadly to all categories but my gut tells me this is true.  

At it's base, your rate needs to be what you need for your company and life run.  I also think it is advisable when you consider that living wage that you at least double it as a bottom line rate.  Your mileage may vary but I feel comfortable saying you will spend a lot of time looking for work and not earning and you need to make hay when there is hay to be made to feed yourself through those bare patches.  If you have a lot of experience and ability then making enough to survive is not enough, you should be charging enough to thrive.  That is the base reality of a rate, if you can't make that then ultimately you can't succeed.

 

Whatever the number you come up with you will have to at some point be battle tested.   

 

My ultimate problem from discussing rate like this is that underpinning this discussion is that rate is the most important variable in finding work.  That if you can find that right sweet spot where you rate finds you all the work you want at maximum dollar.  I don't think this is realistic at all and disregards that what might be more important to a particular client is quality or when the work can be delivered.

 

I think it is more likely that the almost all clients want to pay the least amount possible to get what they want but have no idea what that amount is.  It is up to you to convince them that the what you deliver is worth the what they are going to pay for it.

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