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chikuse
Member

How do you ask the client to end a contract?

I have two hourly paid jobs. I've finished what was described in the JD. Now both clients keep asking me to do something new. These are not within the scope we've discussed before. They are still paying me, but actually I'm not so interested in doing those things. I prefer using my time to work on something that I really enjoy doing. They are very nice clients. What should I do to let them know it's time to close the project without hurting their feelings? Thanks!
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kandytech
Member

My initial though is this: First of all, you can ask the clients to close the contract, now that the initial original work you had contracted for has been done. Don't forget to ask for some detailed feedback. Then, you can ask them to start another contract for the other work. At this stage, if/when they do this, you might want to re-negotiate your terms - extra money might put them off, or if they agree, it might persuade you to carry on working for them! (It is also important to realise that in the future these clients may have the type of work that you may want to do.) OR, after the contract is closed, you might want to politely mention you are not looking to do that kind of work any longer. My only reason for suggesting that you seek to end the contract first, without discussing the fact you do not want to work for them any longer, is no matter how nice a client is, they may get upset and they may let it affect the feedback they leave for you. It should not, but we are all human. However, saying all that, it all depends on how long your working relationship was and how well you know your client. You may be able to discuss all these things together, without the need to not disclose some information. You will have to decide what to do quite soon, because the longer you leave it and quality of the work you do and/or your response time to their requests will deteriorate - it is only natural when you are not enthusiastic about some jobs. That will eventually lead to a breakdown of the good relationship you once had and of course you will get terrible feedback when it is all over.

[quote=Chamira A.] You will have to decide what to do quite soon, because the longer you leave it and quality of the work you do and/or your response time to their requests will deteriorate - it is only natural when you are not enthusiastic about some jobs. That will eventually lead to a breakdown of the good relationship you once had and of course you will get terrible feedback when it is all over.[/quote] Totally agree! This is what I'm worrying about actually. I'm trying to be professional and get things done as soon as I can. However, since I really don't enjoy what I have to do now, I don't know how long this will last. I've sent them several mails and implied that I wanted them to close the project. They keep saying I did a great job and simply ignore what I really want them to do.

I just gave my former clients prior notice with my reasons that I'll be ending our contract. Some gave me good feedback while others gave no feedback at all. I never got negative feedback. You may have to take some risks rather than be held hostage. It would be drastic to refund a client just to remove negative feedback. But unlike before, now you may respond to any feedback comment to offer a clarification or rebuttal. In this way, both the client's feedback and your response will be visible to all future clients looking at your work history.

Don't think they'll give me a negative feedback. They seem happy with my work and keep giving me something new to work on. The only problem is drafting and reviewing legal documents, sourcing suppliers for a certain product, translation, dealing with one client and working for a group of clients are totally different jobs and I don't think one should work on all those things at the same rate. Besides, I'm only interested in some of those things, for example, I actually hate dealing with a group of clients who can't agree with each other on what they want to achieve. This could lead to a disaster sooner or later.
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