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d60b8409
Community Member

How long does it typically take to get a job?

Hey everyone! I'm new here and I've sent out a TON of proposals so far. I've gotten 1 job but I have 9 proposals just hanging in limbo. The oldest one is a week old and most of them don't have any hires or interviews yet.

 

My question is, how long do you typically wait until you give up on a job? I feel a bit discouraged and I'm wondering if clients typically just take a while to pick a freelancer, or if clients usually just leave people hanging when they don't want to hire them? I was hoping I could leave my 9-5 and transition into freelancing online full time after a few months, but now I'm not so sure that this site can give me anything dependable.

 

Also please be nice to me 🙂 I can handle a bit of constructive criticism but I'm not really down to be completely torn apart like I've seen people do on this forum, lol.

10 REPLIES 10
quijibo
Community Member

Most people think freelancing is some sort of get-rich-quick scheme, and it isn't. Most of us, at least when we started, worked 10 times harder than when we had our 9-5 job. I still have days when I can barely find time to eat lunch, and end up going to bed at 4 in the morning with my fingers feeling numb after so much typing. 

 

There are thousands of people out there who are competing for the same jobs as you are. What makes you better than them?

 

Figure that out and you will start to land jobs. 

40add483
Community Member

You completely ignored what they said and their question.

Alexander,

 

First off, you have no idea what "most people think" about freelance writing. So please do not go there. Don't generalize about a bunch of folks you do not know.


Second, you did not even answer his question. You just ranted as you assumed what his thinking was. And where do you get that he is "better" than anyone?

I'm not sure what you read from his post, but it would be much more helpful to actually address what the poster said rather than getting on your own personal soapbox and assuming everything. 

reckon48
Community Member

Smart !!
datasciencewonk
Community Member

Some general things to consider...

 

First, I'm not in your industry, so I cannot speak to the specifics about graphic design in terms of direct knowledge regarding the amount of competition on Upwork. From what I've read in other threads where graphic designers chimed into the discussion, it seems to be a heavily competitive field here. But, again, I'll leave that confirmation to those who actually FL in that area.

 

Regarding how long to wait...

 

I apply and then move forward with what I'm currently working on. Another caveat: being a data scientist I am a geek for analyzing my proposals. So, I check to see if they've hired someone (periodically) or if the proposal has gone "dark", meaning the client hasn't viewed the job in a while (or they've just disappeared). Again, it's merely part of my analytic persona and not something I'm recommending. 

 

Other than that, there's no way of knowing whether they'll suddenly reappear and reach out to you if they're interested. If you withdraw the proposal, then you risk not being considered at all. 

 

Most of the other FLs may tell you that they just move on with applying to other jobs without looking back. That's also a strategy with a caveat: if you take on a certain amount of work and that once "dark" proposal materializes, will you be available to agree to the contract?

 

I landed jobs quickly when I first started. BUT, I have a highly particular skillset that is in demand. 

 

Buona Fortuna!

 

 

Yes! I was thinking exactly what you're saying here but I wasn't sure how to put it in words and make it concise (which, I suppose, is why I'm not a writer). I feel like design is ALWAYS over saturated, but I do have a unique style.  I'm never sure if I should make my work more generic and digestible for a large audience or go crazy with my personal style and hope that someone eventually loves it. Anyways, I think I'll just let things chill for a while instead of stressing and withdrawing proposals all over the place. Thanks!


@Cheyanne T wrote:

Anyways, I think I'll just let things chill for a while instead of stressing and withdrawing proposals all over the place. 


Another thing to remember is that you don't need to withdraw your proposals if you don't want.

 

If you find that you have too many outstanding proposals, and you want to do a spring clean, you can archive them instead of withdrawing them. This cleans up your main screen, and the proposals remain active in case the client ever decides to contact you.

ludy_f
Community Member


@Cheyanne T wrote:

I do have a unique style.  I'm never sure if I should make my work more generic and digestible for a large audience or go crazy with my personal style and hope that someone eventually loves it.


 

Every creator has his or her own unique style.
Even if you try to make your work "more generic" your personality will yet shine through. So, don't worry about your uniqueness and send your offers for the jobs which fit your skill and which you feel confident you can do. Deliver the highest quality you can within the deadline.

 

I'm not sure if withdrawing proposals gives back any connects. I've never withdrawn any of mine. When I started last February, I used up all my connects and got only 4 small assignments. Now, not even 4 months later, I don't even use half my available connects, but I've more than quadrupled my number of jobs.

 

Some customers indeed take their time to reply to your proposal. By the time you've nearly forgotten them, they come knocking at your door, asking if you're available. Nice surprise, isn't it?

 

It takes time and effort to get started. It's a simple matter of not giving up.

lysis10
Community Member


@Cheyanne T wrote:

 

 

Also please be nice to me 🙂 I can handle a bit of constructive criticism but I'm not really down to be completely torn apart like I've seen people do on this forum, lol.

sharks-350x270.jpg

I’ll give ya a non-generic answer.

I am a graphic designer on Upwork, which generally ranks in most top 20 lists as an “in demand skill set” on this platform.

I applied for jobs every single day when I first joined upwork, and it took me 2 weeks to land my first small gig. Start small, be persistent, and you’ll get there.

Today I make 6-figures a year on the platform.
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