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How to deal with a false claim of plagarism.

Ace Contributor
Leroy P Member Since: Jul 22, 2017
1 of 8
I'm currently rewriting an article, where the client has accused me of plagarism, which is far from the case I looked at his notes and was floored by them since they're just words and not full sentences.

The question is if I get more notes, should I cancel the contract and call the client a ***-******* moron or should I weather the storm?
Community Guru
Antun M Member Since: Jan 27, 2018
2 of 8

Leroy P wrote:
I'm currently rewriting an article, where the client has accused me of plagarism, which is far from the case I looked at his notes and was floored by them since they're just words and not full sentences.

The question is if I get more notes, should I cancel the contract and call the client a ***-******* moron or should I weather the storm?

Neither.

Do exactly as you have done - vent a bit here on forum.

Is you client really a nuisance?
They are allowed to give input, albeit in a form of 'just words and not full sentences'.

If you are not exaggerating, if you're unhappy with that particular client - yup, bail on the contract. DO NOT be unprofessional towards the client, but stop your unhappiness.

You (we, all of us) are NOT here to be exploited/harassed/mistreated.
Same goes for the clients.

Community Guru
Martina P Member Since: Jul 11, 2018
3 of 8

Leroy P wrote:
I'm currently rewriting an article, where the client has accused me of plagarism, which is far from the case I looked at his notes and was floored by them since they're just words and not full sentences.

The question is if I get more notes, should I cancel the contract and call the client a ***-******* moron or should I weather the storm?

If you are working with a client that accuses you falsely of a serious offense, I would stop working for him immediately, in the most professional manner. 

"Dear Jim, I believe we are just not a good fit, so I prefer to end the collaboration at this point, I hope you understand." 

Bad feedback is all but guaranteed at this time. Is this your work in progress job? Well, this is screaming bad client as loudly as humanly possible. 

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
4 of 8

"Rewriting" an article is a form of plagiarism in and by itself.

It may or may not be a copyright violation (if the client owns the copyright to the article that is being re-written) but it is always taking someone else's work and trying to make it look unique.

 

Is that your "We pay $ 10 for 1000 words" client?

 

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
5 of 8

lol rewriting articles *is* plagiarism. Looking at the client, he definitely doesn't own the content.

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
6 of 8

Clients whose stock in trade is plagiarism rarely understand, or care, what plagiarism is. They know they can run "plagiarism checkers" on the spun articles they've ordered, then use the word plagiarism to browbeat freelancers into multiple revisions. Run far. Run fast.

Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
7 of 8

And NEVER take on a job that requires "spinning".

 

Community Guru
Kathy T Member Since: Jul 17, 2015
8 of 8

Leroy P wrote:
I'm currently rewriting an article, where the client has accused me of plagarism, which is far from the case I looked at his notes and was floored by them since they're just words and not full sentences.

The question is if I get more notes, should I cancel the contract and call the client a ***-******* moron or should I weather the storm?

Whether or not you plagiarized the articles Whether or not the job is spinning articles And whether or not the client has copyrights to all of these articles is not the problem or question. The question is whether YOU want to continue working with this client and the conditions you are experiencing. So, the answer really depends on You. If the answer is yes, you would still like to work with this client, then do so and make the best of it.  If the answer is no, then end the contract as politely and professionally as you can. You are not, in any way obligated to continuing working with this client and enduring this situation. A client and/or a freelancer can end their contracts at any time, whether they have a reason for ending it or not. 

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