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How to wright perfect cover letter in Web design and development category

Active Member
Md H Member Since: Jul 5, 2015
1 of 10

Can anybody tell me How to wright sweet / short perfect cover letter in Web design and development category ?

Community Leader
Scott E Member Since: Feb 24, 2015
BEST ANSWER
2 of 10

There's some info in this thread that might help...

 

https://community.upwork.com/t5/Freelancers/Covering-Letter/td-p/95475

 

The thing is, the perfect cover letter is dictated by the project and the client in question. Although there's general, basic advice that can be provided for all cover letters (there's some in the thread above), each cover letter should be tailored to the specific needs and requirements of the project... it's not a one size fits all kind of thing unfortunatley. 

 

So your question is kind of like "what is the perfect meal to cook for my date?"... everyone will have a different opinion, and if you go with steak and chips and the lady is a vegetarian and allergic to potatoes then it's far from the perfect suggestion!

 

But that being said... the generally accepted framework would start with hello, a brief overview of your skills and experience (that relate to the project) and then the main body of your cover letter should be talking about the job in question. What interests you about it, what you'll do, why you're the best person for the job, what the client will get if they hire you etc. At the end you can include timelines, prices, what happens with revisions etc... so everyone is clear on what is and isn't included, and then sign off. 

 

There's a bit more to it than that, but you get the idea. 

 

Good luck!

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
3 of 10

Scott, that's excellent advice. But regarding

 

'the main body of your cover letter should be talking about the job in question. What interests you about it, what you'll do, why you're the best person for the job, what the client will get if they hire you etc",

 

what do you write if the job description is vague, such as "I need help" or "I have some small tasks?" I usually don't apply for jobs like that because I have no idea what I'm getting into, but supposing I was tempted, then what do I write in the cover letter?

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
4 of 10

re: "what do you write if the job description is vague, such as "I need help" or "I have some small tasks?" I usually don't apply for jobs like that because I have no idea what I'm getting into, but supposing I was tempted, then what do I write in the cover letter?"

 

If you want to always play it safe, then just ignore these jobs.

 

Personally, I understand that my connects don't actually cost me anything, and I never use up more than a fraction of them in any given month, so I do NOT always play it safe.

 

Sometimes I apply to these jobs and earn a lot of money working for clients who really do have money, but they are inexperienced in the art of crafting job postings.

 

As you may well may imagine, my cover letters are rather short when I apply to jobs with very vague job descriptions. But if clients see my job application, and then click on my profile and decide they want to contact me to interview me, then I can instantly weed out people who are serious from people who are playing games.

 

When I explain in my initial job application that they can hire me at my full hourly rate PRIOR to interviewing me and discussing the job, the clients who aren't serious disappear quickly.

Community Leader
Patrick P Member Since: Jun 17, 2015
5 of 10

@John K wrote:

Scott, that's excellent advice. But regarding

 

'the main body of your cover letter should be talking about the job in question. What interests you about it, what you'll do, why you're the best person for the job, what the client will get if they hire you etc",

 

what do you write if the job description is vague, such as "I need help" or "I have some small tasks?" I usually don't apply for jobs like that because I have no idea what I'm getting into, but supposing I was tempted, then what do I write in the cover letter?


I'm not Scott, but I'll give it a go.

 

At this point I have two approaches to cover letters:

 

1) When the client posts a detailed job description, I reply with a detailed, custom-written cover letter.

2) When the client posts very little detail, but enough that (I'm at least interested in applying) I use a template cover letter that I tweak to match whatever information I can actually glean about the job from the posting.

 

That said, if a posting is short on details, I usually don't even bother.

 

As far as writing cover letters, the three best pieces of advice I can give are:

  • speak with confidence and authority
  • spellcheck (and I've been guilty more than once of ruining my chances because I failed to take this step)
  • put yourself in the client's shoes: if you were posting the same project, what would you want to hear?

That last one's tougher than you would think. Some people fill up their cover letters with a bunch of empty adjectives or talk about themselves in a way that's not attached to the project, and that's bad news. Client's can see through you when you when you overstuff your letter and they care one hundred times more about your skills as related to their project than they do about your "can-do attitude" or the "timely manner" in which you meet projects. You can include this stuff, but you'd better be able to back it up by illustrating in detail how these traits have helped you on past projects.

 

Hope that's helpful for the OP.

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
6 of 10

Sometimes I submit a job application which consists almost entirely of explaining why the client's plan is not going to work well and I briefly outline the approach he should take.

 

These job applications are invariably ignored completely or result in me being hired.

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
7 of 10

Patrick (not Scott) wrote,

 

Some people fill up their cover letters with a bunch of empty adjectives or talk about themselves in a way that's not attached to the project, and that's bad news.

 

I try to limit generalities, but usually I open by saying something about having extensive experience in something related to the job, and close by saying "I do quick, quality work and I'm confident you will be satisfied with it." If the Marketing effectiveness section of my 'My Stats' can be relied on, my cover letters are more effective than the majority.

 

Preston wrote,

 

If you want to always play it safe, then just ignore these jobs.

 

Personally, I understand that my connects don't actually cost me anything, and I never use up more than a fraction of them in any given month, so I do NOT always play it safe.

 

Didn't picture you to be a gambling man, but this makes sense. I'll have to work on overcoming my safety-first instinct.

 

In general, it's unlikely there's a magic cover letter formula that will be ideal in every instance, but it can't hurt to try strategies that others have succeeded with. 

 

 

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Leader
Scott E Member Since: Feb 24, 2015
8 of 10

Sure, if there's not enough info then it's difficult to provide a detailed proposal. But I'll still be discussing their project by asking clarifying questions.... maybe something along the lines of "although I'm confident I can deliver a high standard of work that you'll be really happy with, it's difficult to provide you with an accurate proposal without a few further details. If you'd be kind enough to clarify the following points then I'd be very grateful, and happy to provide you with a detailed quote..." etc etc 

 

And although I agree with Preston (if there's hardly any info at all then it might just be best to move on), if you just need a tiny bit of information to finalize a dollar amount... then there's nothing wrong with basing your price on X with a disclaimer that if they want less than, or more than, X... then the price will alter accordingly. 

 

So if somebody wants an e-book for example, gives plenty of info on what they want but nothing on a word count... I'd just just add something like "as you've not stated a word count, I'll base my proposal amount on providing an e-book of around XX pages, which is usually the norm for a book on your subject. If you have a specific page count in mind, then just let me know, and I can adjust my proposal amount accordingly." 

Community Leader
Scott E Member Since: Feb 24, 2015
9 of 10

As for the 'I have some small tasks' projects... personally, I'd steer clear of them. Although I don't need to know everything down to the letter, I'd need to know roughly what these tasks are to submit a proposal. 

 

I mean, I could submit a proposal, but I'd rather focus on projects where I do know what is involved and whether I have a likelihood of being hired. 

Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
10 of 10

Things I never put in my cover letter cuz I'd be lying

 

hard working

organized

detail oriented

thinks writing is fun

optimistic

perfect grammar and spelling

 

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