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How would client profile details help you?

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
21 of 93

Jennifer M wrote:

I second the info about disputes/cancellations. This would help us stay away from people who are serial disputers and cancellers.

 

It would also discourage the low-end client business model that relies on forcing refunds.

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
22 of 93

LOL.

Yes, I suppose "business model" is one way to characterize theft of this sort.

gilbert-phyllis
Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
23 of 93

If you'd asked me this question when I first joined UW, I'd've requested info about the client's company and the business they're in. By now, though, I've learned that what they share -- or more often, neglect to share -- in their job post or invitation can be a useful initial screening tool for me.

 

That said, I agree with others that it would be useful to see their UW report card if there is one (disputes, etc.) and to see their UW history when they send direct offers.

 

roberty1y
Community Guru
Robert Y Member Since: Aug 25, 2017
24 of 93

Phyllis G wrote:

 

By now, though, I've learned that what they share -- or more often, neglect to share -- in their job post or invitation can be a useful initial screening tool for me.

 

What do you consider to be red flags in job postings? I often find them to be vague, which is annoying, but may only be because the client intends to tell the freelancer more when they contact them.

 

One thing that really gets to me is dishonesty about pay rates. Again and again I see postings that start out like this: "Hourly: $35-$50 - Expert..." etc., then I look through the jobs done for the client in question and find out the average hourly rate they pay for this kind of work is $7 or $8. 

wlyonsatl
Community Guru
Will L Member Since: Jul 9, 2015
25 of 93

Robert Y.,

 

The single most obvious red flag for clients I want to avoid is a job post that includes a phrase along the lines of, "There is plenty of future work for the right freelancer..." or, more ominously, "...so we are looking for good value on this first project...," meaning "we know our budget is small compared to what we know we ought to expect to pay."

 

In other words, "I would gladly pay you tomorrow for a hamburger today."

2a05aa63
Community Guru
Viacheslav K Member Since: Sep 9, 2015
26 of 93

Will L wrote:

Robert Y.,

 

The single most obvious red flag for clients I want to avoid is a job post that includes a phrase along the lines of, "There is plenty of future work for the right freelancer..." or, more ominously, "...so we are looking for good value on this first project...," meaning "we know our budget is small compared to what we know we ought to expect to pay."

 

In other words, "I would gladly pay you tomorrow for a hamburger today."


I mean, why even mention it? Surely if you like the work of a freelancer you will work with them in the future.

bilsim
Ace Contributor
Biljana V Member Since: Jan 20, 2020
27 of 93

I’ve seen many incomplete, misleading and inaccurate details about clients/jobs which bothers me more than introducing new details. Examples:

 

  • Client in Turkey showing Sweden as location in their profile
  • Client in India showing United States as location in their profile
  • Client setting fixed budget to $150 for a writing job that they describe but do not mention the size (word count) anywhere in the job description. Am I supposed to lose my connects on blind bidding?

As such, I don’t see the point in requesting clients to provide more details if they can provide fake or incomplete details without any repercussions.

researchediting
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
28 of 93

Phyllis G wrote:

If you'd asked me this question when I first joined UW, I'd've requested info about the client's company and the business they're in. By now, though, I've learned that what they share -- or more often, neglect to share -- in their job post or invitation can be a useful initial screening tool for me.

 

That said, I agree with others that it would be useful to see their UW report card if there is one (disputes, etc.) and to see their UW history when they send direct offers.


Agreed, much of my screening now depends on how often-anonymized prospects handle the given open-format-with-pulldowns. In that respect, some of the points I responded to earlier might be of only marginal or hypothetical utility. But let me again endorse both accountability for clients' on-platform history and uniformity of client/prospect information at all points of contract acceptance and negotiation.

sjbercot
Community Guru
Sarah B Member Since: Dec 15, 2017
29 of 93

Just chiming in to say my thoughts largely echo the other freelancers here in that I would be interested more in information regarding number of disputes, etc. and seeing information for direct offer clients, and much much less interested in particulars about the client's company or the client themselves (and I think anything that makes it easier to identify clients and contact them off-platform is probably not a great idea). I also don't hesitate to apply for projects with new clients who have $0 spent and no reviews, or even unverified payment. I'm not sure the client profile would affect that, since I don't screen out new clients based on being new.

 

 

c63ea194
Ace Contributor
Ioannis T Member Since: Jan 12, 2018
30 of 93

For me the most important information about a prospective client is how stingy or generous he is

If there was a way to mesure this information, using some scale 0-10 with 0 for extremely stingy clients and 10 for very generous clients, it would be very helpful. 

I couldn't work with a client that focuses mostly on money and not on the quality of the work. And I am very happy when working with clients that focus on quality and don't care too much about money.

It's not that I will make more money from the second category, neither I will try to take advantage of the generosity. It will just make my working time happier and more pleasant

 

I think almost every experienced  freelancer has dealt with behaviours like the following:

 

1. Clients that set an hourly rate of $30-$40 in job posting BUT after chatting, they mention that their entire budget is $50. I wish I could mark this behaviour in client's history. 

 

2. Clients that complaint all the time about hours, money, budget, etc. (Luckily I never workd for such a client and I would like to avoid it in the future)

 

3. Clients that ask for additional work without charging, etc

 

These are some examples. I am sure that there are plenty of such behaviours, in almost all stages of the process, from job posting, interview, offer, to mid-contract, payment, contract-ending, post contact-ending, etc.

 

On the other side, many clients never talk about money and hours. They give bonuses. I even had a client that increased the hourly rate on his side, without any relevant discussion. It would be nice if such behaviours could be added in client's history in some way.

 

In simple words, it would be great if we could see client's attitude regarding money in his history. It will be much more useful that any information about his business, products, etc

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