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Is it worth it to respond to a mediocre rating I believe was unjustified?

Active Member
Sharyn E Member Since: Aug 18, 2015
1 of 7
I wrote a resume for a client and received feedback that I feel was unjustified. Should I respond?
 
I make it a practice to work with a client until she is satisfied; otherwise there is no point to my job. The client was not a native English-speaker and we struggled to understand each other. Many of my suggestions were rejected because she wanted to adhere to her university's resume guidelines, but if she wanted that, there doesn't seem to be a reason to hire me, an outside writer.
 
I've been doing this a long time. I'm good at it. But there are some clients who want what they want, even if it's not what I believe they should do. In these situations I will argue my case but leave the final decision up to them. I try to help them understand any drawbacks, but the final decision is theirs. I believe that she gave me a mediocre rating because I didn't give her what she thought she wanted, even though she didn't really know what that was. 
Sharyn E
Ace Contributor
Rejith P Member Since: Sep 13, 2015
2 of 7

I think it's a tricky situation to be in. In most cases, if someone says he doesn't like a thing (unless it's not for avoiding payments or similar issues), it's likely to remain that way as you really can't change a person's taste.

 

When you say "respond", what did it mean? A mediocre feedback from your side? I guess you would have already given the client feedback if you could read the feedback given by the client. So I assume "responding" means questioning the client on the feedback. I doubt if that would help though and probably can only worsen the situation.

 

I personally do not have such experience here and these are just my thoughts - I could be wrong and someone here may be able to offer you better advice if they have experienced similar situations before.

Community Guru
Irene B Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
3 of 7

Personally, I would respond. It would give prospective clients an indication as to what went down and in effect clear your name.

Active Member
Raitis S Member Since: Jun 26, 2015
4 of 7

Hello,

I had one situation there client put ok feedback (4.5 stars), but wrote comment with whom I didn't agreed and I used "respond to comment" function to give my point of the view on the situation - I believe it's right thing to do. I tried to be as objective as I could and I believe I handled situation well, so if You will like feedback or comment isn't right, why not to give Your point of view? I don't believe that it will worsen chance to get a job in the future. Before I also had gotten like 4.5; 4.6, etc. scores, because I believe that they where fair, so try to be as objective as possible and You feel like comment/feedback was unfair, write about it, explain it - it's nothing wrong about it at all.

 

 

Community Guru
Stephen B Member Since: Dec 4, 2012
5 of 7

I agree, as long as you keep it assertive but entirely professional and objective. In no way insult the client  - remember that others will see your comment and judge you on how professionally you responded to the rating.

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
6 of 7

Sharyn,

 

If by rating you mean number of stars, I would leave it alone. The contrast with your other ratings is sufficient. Responding to a low numerical score serves no purpose.

 

If there is a comment that is misleading, I would restrict myself to correcting any misstatements, as dispassionately, objectively, and generally as possible.

 

My first draft would always start (and perhaps end) something like:

"I am surprised at the client's comments, which do not reflect the work I did on her behalf, the accommodations I made at her insistence, the final result, or the documented substance of our conversations."

 

Best,

Michael

Community Guru
Ela K Member Since: Feb 9, 2015
7 of 7

Douglas Michael M wrote:

Sharyn,

 

If by rating you mean number of stars, I would leave it alone. The contrast with your other ratings is sufficient. Responding to a low numerical score serves no purpose.

 

If there is a comment that is misleading, I would restrict myself to correcting any misstatements, as dispassionately, objectively, and generally as possible.

 

[...]

Michael

I agree. A new (to Upwork) client recently gave me a star rating of 4.4 - which is the lowest I have received so far. He highlighted skills and quality with 5 stars each, everything else was 4 stars. I responded to his emails within 5 minutes of receiving them, delivered the work 2 days before the deadline, was available etc.
At first I was upset - but his written feedback was very positive. I don't particularly care for the fact that it might look like I didn't meet his deadlines. Feedback is subjective - maybe he thought 4 stars was a good average? I wouldn't respond to a low(er) star rating either - but I would tackle written feedback if it was a misrepresentation of what really went down.

 

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