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JSS computation with additional feature

Community Guru
Richard W Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
31 of 51

Tonya P wrote:

What is a long term content:

"May 11, 2019 02:01:16 AM by Vladimir G
...To clarify, clients you work with for at least three months in a past year and pay you regularly are your long-term clients. This could be over one or multiple contracts and could be hourly or fixed-price work. I checked your contracts and one client you're working with is really close to qualifying as a long-term relationship. Keep up the good work and your stats should reflect the long-term status in a couple of weeks."
 

See also, 

https://community.upwork.com/t5/Member-Discussions/Several-contracts-for-the-same-client-does-that-c...

https://community.upwork.com/t5/Freelancers/Couple-of-questions-about-long-term-clients-amp-responsi...

Or, simply type the phrase "long term contract" into the Upwork Community search bar. 


There's been a lot of talk in this thread about "long term contracts". But, based on the quote you've just given and other considerations, I doubt that Upwork's algorithms give any special consideration to the length of contracts. I reckon that the algorithms are just based on long term clients, not contracts. Of course, the two will often coincide. If you've been earning on a contract for long enough, you'll start to get the long-term client benefit. But you would probably get the same benefit if you had an identical pattern of earnings divided between several contracts with the same client.

Community Guru
Richard W Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
32 of 51

Tonya P wrote:

What is a long term content:

"May 11, 2019 02:01:16 AM by Vladimir G
...To clarify, clients you work with for at least three months in a past year and pay you regularly are your long-term clients.


This is the first time that I've seen (or first time I've noticed) the qualification "in a past year", which I take to mean "in the past year".  That would explain some changes in my Long Term Client stat which previously didn't seem to make sense.

 

Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
33 of 51

Will L wrote:

Well, Tonya, what you say may, or may not, be true.

 

But I have seen no information from Upwork that states, "...the minimum qualifications for a long-term contract are 3 months and regular payments. If I understand the process correctly, a contract for which a payment was received in month 2 which remained open with no additional payments for 13 additional months, for example, would not qualify as long-term."

 

What is "regular"? - Once a month, once a quarter, something else? I have never had a contract stay idle for 13 months and would always ask, as I just did recently, that clients close their projects that have been idle for only a couple of months. Most clients do so without question; some admit they had no idea they needed to close their completed projects on Upwork. Reminding them is part of what a freelancer has to do - clients have much less reason to understand Upwork's many rules, protocols, quirks, etc. than freelancers have.

 

Some posters here tell us they know much more about many elements of how Upwork works than Upwork has stated publicly, so, for most of us, this sort of thing is just another blacked-out window in the edifice that is Upwork. We can't see in.


It is quite possible that simply because you have failed to see something does not mean it does not exist. Maybe some posters here are just more capable of finding relevant information than you. 

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
34 of 51

Will L wrote:

 

 

But I have seen no information from Upwork that states, "...the minimum qualifications for a long-term contract are 3 months and regular payments.

 

This is almost word for word what Valeria said a year or more ago in a thread on that subject.

Active Member
Neil P Member Since: Oct 19, 2016
35 of 51

I've actually seen that and already considered it in reverse manner which is just equally bad as I was hoping it to be good, of course. However, if we take a look at my original post, I was actually hoping to get this important variable not a direct contribution to the JSS (though it really sounds like it is) but more of "reserve token" which can be accumulated from the "earning" value and not really from the feedback or rating given by the client or freelancer. The fact is, whatever rating or feedback that the client will give you, you still had brought yourself and the platform a certain amount of earning (same thing as the client). And this earning varies from project to project. Simpler one small earnings. But complex ones got big earnings. So, a freelancer as well as the client can accumulate these extra tokens depending on the "amount" of business they brought to the platform or Upwork. In time of need then, they can use these extra token or merits to use or help them boost their JSS... I hope I was able to express it clearer. It is like, the more you earn, the more business you brought to the platform, the more insured we can be. 

 

It's like an insurance. Insurance does not depend on one's performance but is based on his "contribution". So both freelancers and clients have their monetary contributions to the system regardless of how they performed, right?

Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
36 of 51

Neil P wrote:

I've actually seen that and already considered it in reverse manner which is just equally bad as I was hoping it to be good, of course. However, if we take a look at my original post, I was actually hoping to get this important variable not a direct contribution to the JSS (though it really sounds like it is) but more of "reserve token" which can be accumulated from the "earning" value and not really from the feedback or rating given by the client or freelancer. The fact is, whatever rating or feedback that the client will give you, you still had brought yourself and the platform a certain amount of earning (same thing as the client). And this earning varies from project to project. Simpler one small earnings. But complex ones got big earnings. So, a freelancer as well as the client can accumulate these extra tokens depending on the "amount" of business they brought to the platform or Upwork. In time of need then, they can use these extra token or merits to use or help them boost their JSS... I hope I was able to express it clearer. It is like, the more you earn, the more business you brought to the platform, the more insured we can be. 

 

It's like an insurance. Insurance does not depend on one's performance but is based on his "contribution". So both freelancers and clients have their monetary contributions to the system regardless of how they performed, right?



Not really.

 

One way FLs drive UW's success is by earning money, of which UW gets a percentage. The other way is by delighting clients so that they return to the platform and tell their friends. It is the nature of some professions that FL gigs tend to be small, one-off projects that don't cost a lot. FLs in those fields may be working extremely hard and doing a great job on eveyr project, delighting clients right and left. They are earning steadily--not as much as folks working on five- and six-figure fee projects, but enough for their own goals and they are an important part of the UW ecosystem. What you are proposing would penalize them because of the nature of their work. Unfair and, even more importantly, counterproductive to UW's model of trying to be all things to all clients.

Active Member
Neil P Member Since: Oct 19, 2016
37 of 51

@gilbert-phyllis wrote:

Not really.

 

One way FLs drive UW's success is by earning money, of which UW gets a percentage. The other way is by delighting clients so that they return to the platform and tell their friends. It is the nature of some professions that FL gigs tend to be small...


 

That is how the feedback and rating / recommendations should work. But what I was trying to figure out is a different variable. And this variable is available (earnable) both on the client and freelancer's side. It is based on their earning / contribution to the site. It can act as a reserved token or extra insurance. I can't see how it can affect anyone negatively be a newbie or experienced ones? Who doesn't like extra anyway?

Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
38 of 51

Neil P wrote:

Phyllis G

 

That is how the feedback and rating / recommendations should work. But what I was trying to figure out is a different variable. And this variable is available (earnable) both on the client and freelancer's side. It is based on their earning / contribution to the site. It can act as a reserved token or extra insurance. I can't see how it can affect anyone negatively? Nor why anyone would not like to have it?


You want to offer a perk based solely on monetary contribution to the site. That would serve me well, since my project fees are usually several thousand dollars and I can get along fine with a handful of clients. In other fields, a successful FL typically charges a few hundred dollars, at most, for each project, and needs many dozens of clients a year to earn good money here. That person might be working just as hard or harder than I am; and they are helping UW attract and retain many more clients than I am. But they would be at a disadvantage re. a perk based solely on $$.

Active Member
Neil P Member Since: Oct 19, 2016
39 of 51

Phyllis G wrote:

Neil P wrote:

Phyllis G


You want to offer a perk based solely on monetary contribution to the site. That would serve me well, since my project fees are usually several thousand dollars and I can get along fine with a handful of clients. In other fields, a successful FL typically charges a few hundred dollars, at most, for each project, and needs many dozens of clients a year to earn good money here. That person might be working just as hard or harder than I am; and they are helping UW attract and retain many more clients than I am. But they would be at a disadvantage re. a perk based solely on $$.


Working hard gives us the feeback and ratings we deserve. But winning a transaction to buy a farm as opposed to a tray of eggs clearly has a world of difference. And yes, the amount of business or money you are able to handle in this platform should be merited you as well. One of the thing that everyone should strive for... Big earnings. :-)

 

And it does not necessarily be a disadvantage to small timers or beginners because all their earnings are still merited.  In due time, it will grow big as long as we stay on the line. Don't you think?

Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
40 of 51

Neil P wrote:


Working hard gives us the feeback and ratings we deserve. But winning a transaction to buy a farm as opposed to a tray of eggs clearly has a world of difference. And yes, the amount of business or money you are able to handle in this platform should be merited you as well. One of the thing that everyone should strive for... Big earnings. :-)

 

And it does not necessarily be a disadvantage to small timers or beginners because all their earnings are still merited.  In due time, it will grow big as long as we stay on the line. Don't you think?


No, it doesn't look like everyone agrees with you (myself included). There's no harm in discussing our wishlist of changes that we hope Upwork could make, but it seems like all you're doing at this point is repeating yourself. What's the problem with making high earnings AND keeping clients happy? 

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