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d_gyger
Member

Job invitations to test products

 

Hey community,

 

I'd love your thoughts on something:

 

For some time now I seem to be getting more and more job invites that have nothing to do with my field of expertise (video production & editing), but where I am asked to fill out a survey, or test a product, or something in that area. It's always for a fixed fee of around 50$, and every time I can see that tons of people are interviewing and getting hired for these "jobs". I have always declined them so far, one reason being that I worry it will mess up my reviews if I suddenly have a random job in there that has nothing to do with my field.

 

But especially since these invites have become more frequent, I'm starting to wonder if I'm overthinking this, and may be throwing away chances at making some easy money?

 

As a freelancer, I always look at client's ratings when I consider applying for a job. And I assume it will be the same vice versa, clients will read our reviews before hiring us. But if someone is looking for a videographer, yet finds reviews about how amazing I was at giving feedback on product xy, in my mind that must seem strange and unprofessional.

 

Is anyone else getting these kinds of invites? If so, how are you dealing with them, and why? And how does Upwork feel about this? Very interested in hearing your thoughts.

 

Thanks!

1 REPLY 1
prestonhunter
Member

Inviting newbies to test products?

 

These are mostly scams.

Or they violate Upwork ToS.

Or both.

 

But in the pure sense, testing products is a real type of work that is allowable on Upwork.

 

I would simply consider any client in this category to be on a "short leash." They need to follow all Upwork's rules, and the rules of any site they are asking you to work with, and not ask you to submit reviews to sites which prohibit paid reviews.

 

Filling out surveys? This is a legitimate type of task. I have been both a client and a freelancer for surveys. There are no rules against hiring people to fill out surveys, as a way of gathering information.

 

re: "But if someone is looking for a videographer, yet finds reviews about how amazing I was at giving feedback on product xy, in my mind that must seem strange and unprofessional."

 

Personally, I don't worry about that kind of thing at all. My work history shows the kind of work I do. It is consistent. But not EVERY job is exactly the same type of work. There are some unusual tasks - such as taking part in a survey - compared to the type of work I do generally. I don't think clients are going to worry about that. William Shatner sings on a Christmas album, but I still think of him mainly as an actor, not a singer.

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