Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Job search - can we filter out jobs that require minimum JSS

Active Member
Bradley R Member Since: Aug 18, 2019
11 of 17

After signing up for this and trying to bid on jobs, it is apparent that your system is really flawed. As a new freelancer without any bidding or job history, it impossible not to constantly get job results that include specific requirements such as local location, minimum upwork hours, minimum job success score, include rising talent whatever that is. You need to be able to filter these requirements out of your job search or at least flag these requirements on the search listings, not have to click to the detail page. This is a waste of my time.

 

Then, these job posters are stating they want to pay hourly, and not giving any idea of what they are willing to pay. So I have to bid on the job and burn through these stupid "connects" just to find out I am bidding $50 an hour and they are only willing to pay $12 an hour? This is ludicrous.

Moderator
Joanne Marie P Moderator Member Since: Nov 26, 2017
12 of 17

Hi Bradley,

 

When posting a job, clients have the option to add their preferred qualifications, but you can still submit a proposal to these jobs. The notification that you do not meet requirements only shows up to let you know about the qualifications that clients have included on the job posting; however, if you are a good fit for the position based on your skills and experience then you may submit your proposal.  Before you accept any offer, it is best to discuss the job details with your client so that you both agree on the terms set for each contract. 

 

Submitting a proposal has a financial cost, just like the other expenses you incur as a freelancer running your own business. If a client never hires but doesn't close the job, your Connects are not returned. In this situation, we continue to encourage the client to hire or close the job, but ask that you consider the cost of Connects as part of your business expenses.


-Joanne
Untitled
Active Member
Bradley R Member Since: Aug 18, 2019
13 of 17

Well, not really. The job posters are stating what their minimum requirements are... I could bid on it anyway, but if they were willing to accept bids without those requirements, they wouldn't have included the requirements in the first place. This is where it gets back to burning through the connects. Why waste the connects on bids you aren't going to get 95% of the time? If there was no cost to submit bids then I would bid on the jobs anyway.

 

And contrary to your statement of "submitting a proposal is a cost of doing business," in the real world there is no cost to bid on a potential job, except for your time to write the proposal. Believe me, I am very familiar with pitching a client and writing proposals. I owned and operated my own graphic design studio for 13 years.

 

Another question: is there no way to contact a job poster before bidding on their project? There are a number of jobs that I have questions about exactly what they want, or descriptions that are very unclear. Or do I have to bid the job and burn through more connects just to ask a question and then find out that what they really want is not what is stated in their job description?

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
14 of 17

Bradley R wrote:

Well, not really. The job posters are stating what their minimum requirements are...

 

Generally, they're really not. Some make some near-random selections they think might improve the pool. Many simply accept the Upwork defaults without paying much attention to what they are. People get hired all the time without meeting those criteria.

 

I could bid on it anyway, but if they were willing to accept bids without those requirements, they wouldn't have included the requirements in the first place.

 

It's a good idea, especially when you're new and especially when you have no experience as an Upwork client, not to make assumptions like this. 

 

This is where it gets back to burning through the connects. Why waste the connects on bids you aren't going to get 95% of the time? If there was no cost to submit bids then I would bid on the jobs anyway.

 

If you're like most Upwork freelancers, you aren't going to get hired on 95% of the jobs you bid on, anyway. The way to make those connects count is to focus on the jobs you are most clearly qualified for and have a specific reason that you are a better option than most or all of the other freelancers who will bid.

 

And contrary to your statement of "submitting a proposal is a cost of doing business," in the real world there is no cost to bid on a potential job, except for your time to write the proposal. Believe me, I am very familiar with pitching a client and writing proposals. I owned and operated my own graphic design studio for 13 years.

 

Many of us who have long-term experience like you do find that it is much, much less expensive to spend 10 minutes identifying a prospective client and writing up a quick proposal for ninety cents than it is to spend an hour or more looking for prospects and crafting a more detailed pitch during what would otherwise have been billable time.

 

Another question: is there no way to contact a job poster before bidding on their project? There are a number of jobs that I have questions about exactly what they want, or descriptions that are very unclear. Or do I have to bid the job and burn through more connects just to ask a question and then find out that what they really want is not what is stated in their job description?

 

No, there isn't. The reason there isn't is that one of Upwork's predecessors had that feature, and freelancers drove clients so crazy that it had to be removed. Many of us just bypass jobs without sufficient information. Others target them. That's just an individual business decision.


 

Community Guru
Mark F Member Since: Jul 10, 2018
15 of 17

Bradley R wrote:

Well, not really. The job posters are stating what their minimum requirements are... I could bid on it anyway, but if they were willing to accept bids without those requirements, they wouldn't have included the requirements in the first place. This is where it gets back to burning through the connects. Why waste the connects on bids you aren't going to get 95% of the time? If there was no cost to submit bids then I would bid on the jobs anyway.

Which is exactly why I believe they stopped giving out free connects every month to basic accounts. There were far too many people bidding just because.  I suggest you use your connects strategically but generously.  If you see a project you are a great fit for then propose on it with reckless abandon, but otherwise hold them.

 

 

And contrary to your statement of "submitting a proposal is a cost of doing business," in the real world there is no cost to bid on a potential job, except for your time to write the proposal. Believe me, I am very familiar with pitching a client and writing proposals. I owned and operated my own graphic design studio for 13 years.

And if you were or are able to find a flow of clients with ready made projects without incurring any time cost at all then I salute you.  I do have to wonder though why would you bother here?

 

To me, client acquisition can be rather expensive and less than frutiful at times.  I have mailed proposals that cost me as much as $60.00 to send (not counting printing costs and sending along a USB stick).

 

Another question: is there no way to contact a job poster before bidding on their project? There are a number of jobs that I have questions about exactly what they want, or descriptions that are very unclear. Or do I have to bid the job and burn through more connects just to ask a question and then find out that what they really want is not what is stated in their job description?


I came to Upwork before paid connects and I think the $.90 would have been an issue only because I felt like I was firing into the void without any expectation of return.  I decided to double down on my uncertaintly and bought the plus account, which was $10.00 a month at the time, mainly so I could see the bid ranges.  It quickly became silly though because I was almost always the highest bid and I stuck to it.

 

My fear, which I suspect is your fear, is that how could I win jobs when people are willing to bid so much lower than makes sense to me?   But that assumes that the only thing someone wants is to get their job done as cheaply as possible.  But the reality is, what most people want is value for their money.  I realized I had to figure out the value I provide and speak to those clients that need it.   I also had to figure out a lot of things about how Upwork works in general.

 

Looking at your profile for example, you have written it pretty much as everyone else does.  It is like the cover sheet of a resume that no one ever reads.  Instead I think you should consider putting a very brief statement about what value you bring to the client.  I tell people all the time to imagine you are a client coming to your profile, with a problem that you know how to solve really well, what would you want to read in the first two lines of that to convince a client that you know how to solve that problem.

 

On proposals, you need to write them quickly and concisely but with punch.  In the client review screen they only see at most the first two lines of your cover sheet so if you don't say something immediatley interesting there you will likely get passed over.  Think of those as your hook, those two lines will make them want to read the rest of it and go from there.

 

You need your first win and you may think you will never get it but if you keep testing your method and trying new things and persisting I am sure you will.

 

 

Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
16 of 17

Without JSS, you'll need to grab the job by being clear about what you can do for the person hiring. Use language that a novice business person would understand. 

 

I would change your job title to bookkeeping and account management. Someone looking to hire someone else to do the work may or may not know which software they are using or need to use. They are looking for a task to be done. So, tell them the tasks you do-- not the tools you use to do it. Put the software names in the skills section or in your longer description. 

 

 

Community Leader
Jamie F Member Since: Mar 7, 2010
17 of 17

I'm a client and a freelancer. 

I do not strictly go by JSS or any other metric. I have hired people under 90% because they have submitted an application that caught my attention. I have also been quick to turn down some people with +90% because I thought their applications were poor. I use it as a guide that can help me to make a decision in some cases, nothing more. I think it may give you an edge, but it is far from being something that will put you out of the running (unless it is particularly bad) 

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS