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Less than 90% are not getting any job

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Md. Tanjil A Member Since: Apr 12, 2017
1 of 99

Hi,

 

During the last few months my profile is around 80%. Honestly, I am not getting any job here. I am applying for jobs and not that much happy with contracts or even client response. Actually, no one is replying. My qustion is if peoples profile are 80% what they will do? Most of the jobs are looking for 90% then how 80% will survive. 

I am trying to to do low price jobs to get my JSS up but unfortunately 5$ work even asking for 90%. For a simple photo edit they are asking 90%. 

I think 80% profile are not bad. Cause 80% means you got 80 out of 100. What could be the solution for this? What should we do? 

Upwork should set a rules, more than 100$ work will get 90% freelancers and 50$ will 80% and 20$ will 70%. This could be a fair policy. 

I came from best market place (Elance) to worst market(Upwork). I am not sure about the quality of upwork. Are you guys really happy with this marketplace? Thank you for reading this. 

Community Guru
Janean L Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
2 of 99

@ Md. Tanjil --

 

First, I am unsympathetic to you, because your Profile inaccurately lists your English skill level as "Native/Bilingual." That is quite obviously an error, and clients will recognize that as a misrepresentation. When a client notes that you have misrepresented one aspect of your skills background (i.e., language skills), that client will reasonably infer that the rest of your claims are not to be completely trusted.

 

Second, you seem to have mistaken Upwork for some kind of government-work program, in which the goal is (??) to parcel out jobs equally amongst applicants. That is not the goal at all. That is a somewhat Socialist/Communist approach to employment. Upwork operates on a more Capitalist system:  the marketplace decides what "sells" and and what price. Demand and supply are matched; Upwork is one mechanism by which that match happens -- perhaps often a creaky and imperfect mechanism and perhaps an ideal match is not always achieved. However, if clients and/or freelancers are unhappy with Upwork, then they are free to "demand" a different "supply" of job-matching platform. (Meta-Capitalism in action.)

 

ETA:  My second paragraph above is an indirect response to your plaintive query: "My qustion is if peoples profile are 80% what they will do? Most of the jobs are looking for 90% then how 80% will survive."  The answer is:  "Not Upwork's problem. Upwork is not in the business of providing work for all comers. They are not FDR's Works Progress Administration or CCC."

Community Guru
Alexander F Member Since: Mar 10, 2017
3 of 99

Upwork should make these people pass an English test before they are allowed to say they are fluent or bilingual.

 

It is just ridiculous how anyone who writes "me dear sir much good" thinks he is able to write English articles or cover translation jobs. That's why most jobs here end up with 50 proposals, with 49 of them being from people who will just deliver garbage.

Community Guru
Heath S Member Since: Mar 16, 2016
4 of 99

Alexander F wrote:

Upwork should make these people pass an English test before they are allowed to say they are fluent or bilingual.

 

It is just ridiculous how anyone who writes "me dear sir much good" thinks he is able to write English articles or cover translation jobs. That's why most jobs here end up with 50 proposals, with 49 of them being from people who will just deliver garbage.


I could not agree more with your statement, Alexander. False claims of language ability (any language, not just English) hurt everyone using Upwork. Sure, if a client wants to pay bottom dollar for a freelancer who obviously has weak English skills, they should be able to. Yet the clients who truly want a native, or at least fluent speaker, are flooded with proposals from freelancers with inadequate English ability. I'm certain this drives quality clients away from Upwork in disgust.

 

This is one reason I strongly support Upwork's decision to offer the "US freelancers only" option in job posts. No, it's not a perfect solution - the US is far from the sole Anglophone nation, and US residency does not guarantee English fluency. Additionally, many people, even on these forums, reside in non-Anglophone countries and have superb English skills. Still, I believe this option is a step in the right direction.

 

What's the best solution? I honestly don't know. But I do know that if Upwork doesn't take additional measures to prevent or punish misrepresentation of English language ability, the reputation of the site will continue to suffer and client growth will be affected.

Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
5 of 99

Alexander F wrote:

Upwork should make these people pass an English test before they are allowed to say they are fluent or bilingual.

 

It is just ridiculous how anyone who writes "me dear sir much good" thinks he is able to write English articles or cover translation jobs. That's why most jobs here end up with 50 proposals, with 49 of them being from people who will just deliver garbage.


Misrepresentation of English level in freelancers is something that is frowned upon among this community. Overestimating one’s language level does more harm than good and is often totally unnecessary. The OP being a graphic designer, he should put Conversational as his English level, it won't have much negative impact on his success. Clients are asking him to design stuff, not to write stuff.

 

However, while some people overestimate their language skills on purpose, many really believe they are near to bilingual while this is not the case.

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
Active Member
Md. Tanjil A Member Since: Apr 12, 2017
6 of 99

Thank you for your reply. I understand your point and I am fixing all those. Thank you again for clarify everything with a helpful attitude. Have a good day. Janean L

Community Guru
Will L Member Since: Jul 9, 2015
7 of 99

I am very sympathetic to your problem Md. Tanjil A.

 

The rating systems on Upwork are, as far as know, all based on five levels (e.g. five stars).

 

Logically, this should mean that a rating in the middle - a "3" out of "5" or three stars out of five - is an average score. In the real world, there is nothing wrong with being average. In fact, unless a freelancer does something extraordinary a rating of all 3s out of 5 should mean the freelancer did what was required in successfully completing a project.

 

But there has been substantial grade inflation on Upwork - every freelancer is sweating out getting the highest rating in all respects from every client. To paraphrase a famous US comedian, "...all Upwork freelancers want to be considered way above average." Of course, this is silly. Anyone who understands even simple statistics knows that everyone in a population being above average is just not a possibility.

 

if a potential client ever asks you why your Job Success Score is not above 90% (or even 80%), ask them if they know exactly how that score is calculated. They won't know, of course, because no one outside a few people working at Upwork knows. So, when that prospective client admits they do not know how the JSS is calculated, you can then tell them you don't know either and tell them why you're the right freelancer for their project. (That's the conversation that took place before one of my most recent Upwork assignments.)

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
8 of 99

 


Will L wrote:

I am very sympathetic to your problem Md. Tanjil A.ents.)


 Really? Did you look at his profile and feedback history?

 


Will L wrote:

The rating systems on Upwork are, as far as know, all based on five levels (e.g. five stars).


 ONLY the public star rating is.

 

The private feelback is a 1 - 10 scale for two questions. Then there are all the other factors.

 


Will L wrote:

Logically, this should mean that a rating in the middle - a "3" out of "5" or three stars out of five - is an average score. In the real world, there is nothing wrong with being average.


 If I spend my hard earned money, "average" is not what I am looking for. I am not looking for a 22% chance of my project going wrong.

 

In the real world, "average" does not get you anywhere, either.

 

On eBay, for example, a seller who falls below 4.7 on their DSR (Detailed Seller Rating- their equivalent of the private feedback clients leave here) will lose their selling account. Simple as that. Platforms only want suppliers who deliver superb customer experiences, consistently. This is as true on Amazon and eBay as it is on Upwork.


Will L wrote:

But there has been substantial grade inflation on Upwork - every freelancer is sweating out getting the highest rating in all respects from every client.


 Unfortunately, NOT every freelancer is really either able or willing to put in the effort, or has the ability, to get the highest rating from every, or at least almost every client.

 

This reflects in their JSS, as it should.

 


Will L wrote: Of course, this is silly. Anyone who understands even simple statistics knows that everyone in a population being above average is just not a possibility.

 No, of course it isn't possible. That isn't the aim either. The aim is to differentiate those who are, from those who are not.

Community Guru
Will L Member Since: Jul 9, 2015
9 of 99

Well, Petra, you appear to know all there is to know about Upwork's various freelancer "rating" systems.

 

So, exactly how is the JSS calculated? What are the exact criteria used?

 

Is every criteria client-focused, or is some portion of the JSS a rating by Upwork concerning how well a freelancer does what Upwork wants them to do, unrelated to how well a freelancer treats his/her clients?

 

And if the criteria for calculating the JSS are not all related to job success with clients, why is it called a "Job Success Rating"?

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
10 of 99

Will L wrote:

1) Well, Petra, you appear to know all there is to know about Upwork's various freelancer "rating" systems.

 

2) So, exactly how is the JSS calculated? What are the exact criteria used?

 

3) Is every criteria client-focused, or is some portion of the JSS a rating by Upwork concerning how well a freelancer does what Upwork wants them to do, unrelated to how well a freelancer treats his/her clients?

 

4) And if the criteria for calculating the JSS are not all related to job success with clients, why is it called a "Job Success Rating"?


1) No need for getting snarky. I have access to the same sources of information you do, no more and no less, plus can draw from observing how my own and other people's JSS has behaved over time, plus I am also a client, so I know how the system works from that side, too. It is hardly rocket science.

 

2) Read up on the various sources. The precise formula (such as how much of a drop or rise happens because of which criteria) is not known but the more jobs someone has done within the 3 calculation windows, the smaller the impact of a single outcome becomes.

 

3) I'm not sure what you mean, Will. What does "Upwork want freelancers to do which is not related to the contracts freelancers have with their clients?"

 

4) Which criteria are you aware of which are not related to jobs with clients? I can not think of a single one.

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