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My JS increased from 82 to 100

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
11 of 18

Kudos to all the participatns of this discussion. We finally have some tangible, confirmed details about JS calculation, namely that the displayed score is the highest among the 6, 12, and 24 month JS scores. This being the case, I'd like to request Upwork to display somewhere in My Stats whether it's displaying a 6, 12, or 24 month score. If nothing else, it might help freelancers who haven't seen this discussion understand their JS better.

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"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Leader
Cristian F Member Since: Jun 21, 2015
12 of 18

John, that's an excellent idea! Knowing which timeframe has the best score would make things so much easier!!!

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
13 of 18

@John K wrote:

....We finally have some tangible, confirmed details about JS calculation, namely that the displayed score is the highest among the 6, 12, and 24 month JS scores. This being the case, I'd like to request Upwork to display somewhere in My Stats whether it's displaying a 6, 12, or 24 month score. If nothing else, it might help freelancers who haven't seen this discussion understand their JS better.


Great thought, John!

 

As long as we're dreaming: Upwork has all three snapshot scores available at the time it picks the best one to display. All three could be piped to our My Stats page. (They even have a ready-made display graphic on the JS Help Center page.) This would give us an overview of how we're trending, and probably make it easier for us to recall or spot any bumps or hiccups.

 

Best to all,

Michael 

Community Guru
Sandra T Member Since: Nov 26, 2014
14 of 18

My thought too, but I didn't dare to suggest it.

 

I guess it could be abused though, meaning with more certainty about the score people might be able to figure out to what extend letting a/the occasional contract go sour would hurt their JS or not.

Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
15 of 18

Well, my JS just went from 99 to 97, despite feedback score, long-term clients, and clients who would recommend me being the highest they've ever been,  so this is of more than academic interest to me now. Cat Frustrated But I guess as long as my long term clients aren't paying attention to it and having second thoughts, I won't dwell on it. Cat Tongue

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
16 of 18

@Sandra T wrote:

 

I guess it could be abused though, meaning with more certainty about the score people might be able to figure out to what extend letting a/the occasional contract go sour would hurt their JS or not.


I don't think so, Sandra.

 

We are almost always working with strangers, who like all of us put our best foot forward. We may not see the other foot until it's too late.

 

In other words, we can always expect things to go wrong. Trying to figure out the extent to which we can "allow" things to go wrong is high-risk. I'd go so far as to say it's self-defeating and stupid. Anyone who banks on such a strategy is likely to lose out to the provider who gives 100% to each and every contract.

 

Best,

Michael

Community Guru
Sandra T Member Since: Nov 26, 2014
17 of 18

Hi Michael,

 

I don't think we're actually disagreeing (that much). I neither meant to say that this could be a safe strategy nor that it would pay off in the long-run. But people are people and will try anything.  (And I can already imagine waves of threads with titles like "my JS score should only have dropped 4 points Smiley Very Happy)

 

Freelancers attempt(ed) to manipulate public feedback, to avoid bad feedback by refunding, and multiple other ways, which is one of the main reason why the (somewhat blurry) JS score was implemented and connected to some not so manipulable (not sure this is a word) factors. I mainly meant to say that the more some people know, the more they are going to try to get away with.

 

However, I also have some understanding for a scenario in which let's say a good, busy freelancer bumps into an awful client and instead of dealing with and spending an awful lot of time, nerves and energy by going through the "proper" channels (with an outcome not always so foreseeable) just quits and takes a hit in his/her score from let's say 97 to 94 because the information (see Setu's other thread) at hand allows them to make this fairly accurate prediction.

Community Guru
Setu M Member Since: Jan 26, 2014
18 of 18
I have been following the discussion.

Sandra makes a really interesting point, about what would happen if freelancers were able to predict the actual impact of decisions taken for particular jobs.

It is a practical argument. Could this be open to abuse of a different kind? Run off with a large escrow amount, knowing that even if the client rates me poorly I will only suffer a 2% hit?

I think there are already enough systems in place to deter deliberate sabotage or mediocre work. It may actually save us from being puppets for some "bad" clients, who hold many hostage with the threat of the JS score (as Sandra indicated).

I will keep an open mind going forward.
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