cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Need for a request more information button

lonehorseend
Ace Contributor

 I ran across ithe phrase "Message me if you have any questions" again today.

 

The only way I can see to do that is to submit a propasal and hope the client notices me. But what if I don't want to waste connect on a job I might only be partially insterested in until I have more information?

 

I realize that clients don't want to be spammed, so how about we have a reason for contact list that includes a text box with a character limit so that freelances can ask a question that might not be on the list?

9 REPLIES 9
prestonhunter
Community Guru

Ani, you will not receive what you are asking for.

 

You may use connects to initiate contact with the client. Or you may move on.

 

Sorry.

 

If you do not have enough information for you to feel confident in applying to a job, then you are not the right candidate for that job.

 

As a client, I may be interested in candidates you have questions about the job proposal. But I do not have time for non-candidates' questions.

 

It more symantics, than a confidence factor, for me. If a client is going to say something like please feel free to ask me questions, shouldn't there be a way to ask them and have them answered? The way I'm thinking it could be an opt-in system for the client so they don't have to allow questions. Upwork could even charge a freelancer a connect for asking a question.

 

As a freelancer, I have to provide all my information up front, but I don't know anything about the clients until they allow contact. I don't even know if my bid is within their budget for hourly projects.  The average pay helps somewhat, but that only shows up for clients who have done more than one job and have a verified payment method on UpWork. 

 

 

Are the clients aware that freelancers can't just ask a question? Maybe expectations are different than reality.

This is a vaild discussion. I'm sorry that the current system does not match Ani's expectations.

 

Here are a few points to keep in mind:

 

Currently there is no way for a contractor to contact a new potential client other than by sending a job proposal.

 

Sending a job proposal in no way compells a contractor to accept a job. Sending a job proposal is a way to open up dialogue between the contractor and the client.

 

If a contractor had unlimited job proposals, this really would not be an issue. Because a contractor could simply use a job proposal as a way of asking a question.

 

But contractors ARE limited in the number of free connects they are given each month, so they are limited in the number of job proposals they can send.

 

Upwork WANTS to limit the amont of job proposals clients receive, in order to improve the quality of those proposals and improve the client experience.

 

Ani has stated that she would like to ask clients questions. But she is not Upwork's target customer. The client is Upwork's target customer. Ani or anybody who supports this idea would need to explain how allowing contractors to send unsolicited questions or notes to clients would materially benefit clients so much that it would compensate for the potential for abuse, spam, annoying notes, etc. The functionality that Ani describes does not fit into the user experience that Upwork envisions for clients, in which a job posting results in a select number of high-quailty job proposals, rather than spam.

 

Yes, the idea that allowing questions would be an opt-in option has been proposed. In a perfect world one might envision this as a happy middle ground. But this would require additional programming and it would add one more element of complexity to the client's job-posting screen. Without necessarily benefitting clients and without foreseeably increasing Upwork's revenue.

 

Upwork might think that it is perfectly reasonable for a contractor to use a couple connects to contact a client and ask a question. Upwork's preferred contractors are those who use the smallest number of connects per month.


Ani has stated that she would like to ask clients questions. But she is not Upwork's target customer. The client is Upwork's target customer. Ani or anybody who supports this idea would need to explain how allowing contractors to send unsolicited questions or notes to clients would materially benefit clients so much that it would compensate for the potential for abuse, spam, annoying notes, etc. The functionality that Ani describes does not fit into the user experience that Upwork envisions for clients, in which a job posting results in a select number of high-quailty job proposals, rather than spam.

 

Yes, the idea that allowing questions would be an opt-in option has been proposed. In a perfect world one might envision this as a happy middle ground. But this would require additional programming and it would add one more element of complexity to the client's job-posting screen. Without necessarily benefitting clients and without foreseeably increasing Upwork's revenue.


To eliminate annoying notes, there would be a character limitaiton in the text box. Questions could be limited to say 50 to 140 characters (if you Tweet, you know how to make your point even with that limitation). LImits to prevent spam could default to one question per user per job posting based on the user's login and IP address. The client could allow more questions per user when they allowed the questions in the first place.

 

The bigger problem with SPAM for UpWork is the unsoclied emails they get after the contractor is hired and wants their friends / family hired - https://community.upwork.com/t5/Clients/Unwanted-service-offers-through-email-after-having-worked-wi...

 

Is it beneficial for the clients?  Maybe not for the ones who leave detailed job descriptions, but for those who do the real short ones and ask the contractors to ask questions, defintely. 

 

Is it beneficial to UPWork? Yes. Their job is client satisfaction. Clients aren't satisifed with contractors who do not meet their expections once they are hired. Also, the more work freelancers are able to do, the more that Upwork can collect in fees from them.


Upwork WANTS to limit the amont of job proposals clients receive, in order to improve the quality of those proposals and improve the client experience.

 

Upwork's preferred contractors are those who use the smallest number of connects per month.


Then give us freelancers the tools to make the informed bids and know where they stand in the process. I'm down to 14 connects from 60 allocated applying for jobs that I know I'm at least 90% qualified for and hand-crafting every one of my responses. Yet, if your statement holds true, I'm one of the non-preferred contractors because I've used up too many connects.

Kudos to Ani for thinking outside the box and bringing some new ideas to the table.

 

I always appreciate clear thinking and fresh ideas from thoughtful Upwork users, whether or not their ideas are completely aligned with my own.

charlieecpa
Community Leader

Respectfully, this is not a good idea. 

 

If we post a job, we receive no less than 30 proposals. 

 

If every freelancer was able to send us a message, you can be sure that my phone would be blowing up 24/7. 

 

If a client likes what's in your profile, they will contact you. This is why it is important to create a good profile. 

 

 

None of this would be an issue if buyers worded their job postings properly, instead if expecting contractors to guess what they want. And then get upset if someone wants to ask a question about the job.

Reiner: I am new here and this was the first issue that stopped me on my tracks. The description of the job I am interested in is one sentence long. For a civil engineering project! Your comment is the only one that makes sense to me in this string.

 

I think to be safe the size of the proposal fee should be higher the shorter the number of syllables used in the request for proposal!

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS