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Newbie Question: Building a Portfolio and Reputation

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Active Member
Tres P Member Since: Aug 24, 2016
1 of 8

Hey Everyone,

 

I recently joined UpWork after the SaaS company I was working for was acquired. In my last few positions, not only did I write much of the sales copy, but I also wrote quite a bit of content for our marketing team. 

 

I suppose my question is two-fold:

 

1) I'm new to Freelance, so I'm not clear on the "rules" of my portfolio. I've done a number of projects outside of UpWork, I don't have any bylines nor do I have client's permission to utilize them. I posted a few small projects to Medium and linked my portfolio to them, but should I be offering more? 

 

2) I've been silent stalking the forums and understand the importance of establishing myself in a niche. That said, in conjunction with my portfolio issues, I don't have job history. Should I be responding to RFPs for lower level "rewrite" or content-gen/blog postings or will this bite me in the ass somehow? 

 

Turns out this might have been better of as two separate posts...oops!! Thanks in advance for everyone's help!

 

Cheers,

Tres

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Community Guru
Virginia F Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
2 of 8

You should change English to "fluent".

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Active Member
Tres P Member Since: Aug 24, 2016
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3 of 8

Why fluent not native?

View solution in original post

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Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
4 of 8

Tres, your overview is much, much too wordy. You don't need to tell anybody why you switched from one thing to another.

 

A client wants to know what you can bring to the table. If you have  x number of years experience in hospitality say so and in what area - marketing, reception, events organization, gastronomy , etc.   You don't have to say you are passionate about writing. It is a very overused  cliché (even if your client or potential client uses it) - if you are offering your services in this field, it should be a given that you are passionate about it, but you need to add samples of your writing  to prove that you are capable of delivering work relevant to the client's field. 

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Active Member
Tres P Member Since: Aug 24, 2016
5 of 8

Thanks for the advice., I'll update my profile now. I take your last section to mean I need to add additional writing examples uploaded specifically to UpWork?

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Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
6 of 8

@Tres P wrote:

Thanks for the advice., I'll update my profile now. I take your last section to mean I need to add additional writing examples uploaded specifically to UpWork?


Not necessarily in your public portfolio (I have very little in mine as it was pirated a few months ago.), but have enough relevant samples to show a client when you send your proposal. 

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Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
7 of 8

Taking junk jobs will definitely bite you in the ass later. They'll be displayed on your profile (title, dates, rating and how much you were paid) and it's very easy to relegate yourself to the wrong neighborhood around here.

 

 

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Community Guru
Samantha S Member Since: Jun 23, 2016
8 of 8

I have only been here a few months, but here are my two cents...

 

1. First, you don't want to share portfolio items against the client's wishes even if these clients were off site. I have done some uncredited and ghostwriting projects that I would love to include in my portfolio, but I can not. It is safest to post bylined or credited work. You can also post work you did just for your portfolio. I personally think you should link to each article individually. Linking to your contributor profile may be fine for some, but I think it adds too many steps for the client.

 

2. I would say that you should look for entry level projects if you have some skills but not that much experience. That is what entry level work is for. However, there are jobs posted here that are not even entry level. I don't think there are many benefits to the very low paying farmer's projects. They don't pay well, the work doesn't look good on your profile, and you are not really learning valuable skills doing that type of work. I think even if a project is ghostwriting, stick with work you would be proud to show prospective clients. Even if you can not actually show them the work, such projects look good on your profile and give you valuable experience. 

 

A friend who freelances gave me some advice. She said during my freelance business time, I should either be working for clients or working on building my business. Here, you can work on creating portfolio items for yourself, learning skills, researching platforms, or taking Upwork tests when you are between jobs. I need to work on a few portfolio items, but have been too busy. 

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