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Now that Connects cost hard-earned money, why don't job postings expire?

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
21 of 30

Lori M wrote:

I have to agree this is frustrating and a waste of time and money (connects) for Freelancers if the clients are coming in and posting jobs with no intent on hiring!


But why assume that clients are posting with no "intent on hiring"? Wouldn't that be a weird waste of their time? Isn't it more likely that they posted in multiple places and hired somewhere else, or didn't find a freelancer that suited them in their proposals, or were overwhelmed by junk cut and paste proposals and bailed, or had the project put on hold from above (or any of dozens of other things that can lead to someone not hiring a freelancer from a specific platform during a specific time period)?

Active Member
Joey W Member Since: Jul 26, 2019
22 of 30

Or at least give us connects back when we withdraw proposals.  I recently went back and withdrew (withdrawed)  Smiley Happy proposals because they had been sitting for 60 days.  I didn't realize that you don't get your connects back when you withdraw.  I am more than happy to withdraw after 60 days to that support does not have to get involved, but I want my connects back

Community Guru
Mark F Member Since: Jul 10, 2018
23 of 30

Because people getting them back would be counter to making them pay for them in the first place.  If there is no loss then there is no risk, therefore they can still blanket send proposals for which they are not qualified.

Active Member
Joey W Member Since: Jul 26, 2019
24 of 30

That's presuming we really think that the reason they are charging for connects is to prevent unqualified people from putting in too many proposals.

 

I am sure better solutions for that problem exist.  As much as I don't like automated resume screening, it would work in this situation.

My use case may be unique.  I have a higher rate than many, AND the category of work I apply for is pretty limited in the number of jobs that are posted the combination of not getting connects back and them expiring makes it a tough pill to swallow.  Combine that with high commission rates and its all a little frustrating.

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
25 of 30

@joeywashburn wrote:

Or at least give us connects back when we withdraw proposals.  I recently went back and withdrew (withdrawed)  Smiley Happy proposals because they had been sitting for 60 days.  I didn't realize that you don't get your connects back when you withdraw.  I am more than happy to withdraw after 60 days to that support does not have to get involved, but I want my connects back

 

But giving them back to you to use again defeats the whole purpose of charging for them, which is to encourage freelancers to bid on far fewer jobs and be far more selective about the jobs they do bid on.


Community Leader
Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
26 of 30
Mark F wrote:

No joke!  High budget and high hire rate too.  If I could FIND 100 jobs worth proposing to in a month I would be more than happy to spent $100.00 to propose on them.  

Funny thing in my section -- if there is a high budget posted, I avoid bidding.  lol Sometimes the budget is so obviously a scam too but dummies keep bidding. There was one not too long ago with a $100,000 budget and stupid people bid on it. lol

 

**bleep** it, I really, really wanted that job.

Active Member
Joey W Member Since: Jul 26, 2019
27 of 30

I am not saying we should get everything back, but when we apply for a job and after 30 days and there is zero movement from the client we should be eligible for something.  I have posted a screenshot as an example.

I feel very much like all the weight of the worker/upwork/client relationship is on the back of us the freelancers.  I understand that the hiring people are busy, but 16 days with not a single interview.  If this was to go to 30 days without any movement, I would think that it would be acceptable to make them close the proposal, give back at least some of the connects.  Or maybe it should kick off a workflow so that someone from Upwork gets involved and sends out invitations to qualified candidates.

Screen Shot 2019-07-26 at 1.57.14 PM.png

Community Leader
Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
28 of 30

Joey, no one likes having to pay for anything, we all like everything to be free.

 

I see it like this, if you (or I) were to go and pitch for a job out in the 'real world', it would cost us money. Money to get to the potential client's offices, money (in time) to produce a presentation, money in transport costs, money to get some lunch. Would I expect the people or company I am pitching to, to reimburse me for that? Of course I wouldn't, so why on earth would I expect the same on here, either from the poster or the site? 

 

I don't pay for any of those costs on Upwork. Absolutely zilch. All I pay is a tiny, tiny amount to potentially get a job which will pay me far, far more than it cost to apply for it.

Active Member
Deja L Member Since: Jun 27, 2019
29 of 30

This analogy kind of doesn't apply because it's a totally different market. Upwork's business model isn't par for the course with any other freelancer site. We're talking Guru, Freelancer, Fiverr... even Indeed and Flexjobs if you want to include those. We're applying for remote jobs without the expectation of ever having to incur those costs in the first place. So to compare it doesn't make sense. I've applied to and have been hired for remote jobs on Indeed without having to pay for an application, have 20% of my income docked before taxes, or ever having to leave my home office.

 

There are so many options now, I just haven't really put as much effort into them because I've been with Upwork for so many years. But having been forced to test the waters, it's really not all that bad. 

Community Leader
Richard S Member Since: Mar 12, 2019
30 of 30

This analogy kind of doesn't apply because it's a totally different market. Upwork's business model isn't par for the course with any other freelancer site. We're talking Guru, Freelancer, Fiverr... even Indeed and Flexjobs if you want to include those. We're applying for remote jobs without the expectation of ever having to incur those costs in the first place. So to compare it doesn't make sense. I've applied to and have been hired for remote jobs on Indeed without having to pay for an application, have 20% of my income docked before taxes, or ever having to leave my home office.

 

There are so many options now, I just haven't really put as much effort into them because I've been with Upwork for so many years. But having been forced to test the waters, it's really not all that bad. 

 

Well, we'll agree to disagree. If people make the decision to only do work remotely, then they don't incur costs that they otherwise would pitching for work 'in the real world' - being two different markets with different costs was exactly my point.

 

 

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