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Observation: The Community is similar to other social media, with the same dangers for freelancers

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
11 of 17

This cuts both ways.  If I discovered a client burned kitties as a pastime, I would first close my contract faster than it takes to press the button, and then I would try to get their account suspended on FB and anywhere else including Upwork. 

Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
12 of 17

Bill H wrote:

Anybody heard of someone acing a job interview only to be turned down for a six-figure salary because of what was found on social media? "Mr. Smith, we would love to offer you the job, but that video on FB of you setting cats on fire convinced us to hire someone less likely to suffer a psychotic break."

 

I read job applicants' posts in the Community. Those who display attitudes of entitlement, resentment or superiority are rejected. Those who offer helpful advice are on the interview list. Maybe I'm an unusual client. What if I'm not?


You might want to read this article https://hrdailyadvisor.blr.com/2018/09/12/can-you-fire-an-employee-over-social-media-posts/, specifically this paragraph: 

Here are some examples of when an employee’s social media posts should not result in firing, even if it may seem warranted otherwise:

  • When the post is protected in some way. The most prominent example that some employers overlook or get wrong: Employees should not be fired when their social media post could be considered “concerted activity” and could, therefore, be protected activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Concerted activity includes discussing working environment among coworkers—even in a negative way in public. Employers can get into trouble when they’re too restrictive in their social media policies—overbroad restrictions or repercussions can go against an employee’s NLRA rights.
Community Guru
Melanie H Member Since: Nov 2, 2017
13 of 17

Christine A wrote:

Bill H wrote:

Anybody heard of someone acing a job interview only to be turned down for a six-figure salary because of what was found on social media? "Mr. Smith, we would love to offer you the job, but that video on FB of you setting cats on fire convinced us to hire someone less likely to suffer a psychotic break."

 

I read job applicants' posts in the Community. Those who display attitudes of entitlement, resentment or superiority are rejected. Those who offer helpful advice are on the interview list. Maybe I'm an unusual client. What if I'm not?


You might want to read this article https://hrdailyadvisor.blr.com/2018/09/12/can-you-fire-an-employee-over-social-media-posts/, specifically this paragraph: 

Here are some examples of when an employee’s social media posts should not result in firing, even if it may seem warranted otherwise:

  • When the post is protected in some way. The most prominent example that some employers overlook or get wrong: Employees should not be fired when their social media post could be considered “concerted activity” and could, therefore, be protected activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Concerted activity includes discussing working environment among coworkers—even in a negative way in public. Employers can get into trouble when they’re too restrictive in their social media policies—overbroad restrictions or repercussions can go against an employee’s NLRA rights.

Well, that's the thing...no interviewer is going to come right out and say this, as in Bill's example in his original post.

 

But does it happen? Of course. If you're talking generally, with hiring/not hiring (anywhere) and social media discoveries.

Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
14 of 17


Well, that's the thing...no interviewer is going to come right out and say this, as in Bill's example in his original post.

 

But does it happen? Of course. If you're talking generally, with hiring/not hiring (anywhere) and social media discoveries.


Oh, I'm sure that it does happen. But I used to do graphic design work for an HR consulting firm, and employers have been successfully sued for firing (or not hiring) people based on their social media posts. The firm that I worked for cautioned firmly against going through employees' (or potential employees') social media accounts. I believe that posts on this forum fall under the category of co-workers discussing their working environment. (It doesn't mean that people shouldn't be civil, though.)

Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
15 of 17

Christine A wrote:


Well, that's the thing...no interviewer is going to come right out and say this, as in Bill's example in his original post.

 

But does it happen? Of course. If you're talking generally, with hiring/not hiring (anywhere) and social media discoveries.


Oh, I'm sure that it does happen. But I used to do graphic design work for an HR consulting firm, and employers have been successfully sued for firing (or not hiring) people based on their social media posts. The firm that I worked for cautioned firmly against going through employees' (or potential employees') social media accounts. I believe that posts on this forum fall under the category of co-workers discussing their working environment. (It doesn't mean that people shouldn't be civil, though.)


Laws governing employee-employer relationships don't apply to freelancers. We are independent business owners. 

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
16 of 17

Bill/Petra, I agree with both of you. I'm not interested in winning any jobs by pretending to be something I'm not--that's just a recipe for a bad relationship.

 

But, the freelancers who come to the forums bragging about having stolen a client's website or harassing people for feedback and that sort of thing...that's not a matter of fit. It's hard to imagine anyone hiring those freelancers if they see their forum posts. 

 

Maybe pointing it out isn't such a good idea, though. Isn't it better for everyone if the bad freelancers and clients out themselves?

Community Guru
Bill H Member Since: Aug 18, 2017
17 of 17

Tonya P is spot on. If I reject a freelancer application there was no interview and there was no employment consideration.

 

I generally hire people to have direct contact with my clients. My VA performs tasks for clients every day. He knows their business secrets, some of which are worth many millions of dollars. It's client-facing roles where I do a deeper dive. And I always pay them more than they requested.

 

If I hire someone to translate Governmentspeak to English, I don't care. Non-commodity service providers who have carte blanche with my customers get vetted. Setting cats on fire, with subsequent therapy, wouldn't bother me. Poor customer service attitude, or hostility toward clients in general, bothers me far more

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