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joehonzik
Community Member

One thing I don't understand about Upwork

Has this ever happened to you? You begin conversation with a potential client that is going well, you're optimistic you'll get the job. In the meantime you decline other jobs, even good looking ones, not wanting to overcommit yourself.  Then.. the first job falls through/doesn't pan out for whatever reason.  Can you then go back and re-apply for the jobs you declined if they are still open? No! Why not? Upwork would make more money from you if they allowed this, but they don't. I don't understand why. 

 

Upwork penalizes you if you don't respond quickly to offers, but when you do respond quickly (by declining them in favor of others), you get penalized again for having declined because you can't go back and reapply.  It's often beyond your control if a potential job does not pan out. You can not know the future. Circumstances change. We ought to be able to reapply to declined jobs if they are still open. 

If you agree with me, please let Upwork know. I have complained about this but it has fallen on deaf ears. Perhaps if enough of us mention it they will reconsider this policy. 

7 REPLIES 7
martina_plaschka
Community Member

You employ time-management skills. You accept jobs and tell clients when you will schedule them. You never ever decline jobs in favor of a job you have not been hired for. 

Even jobs you have been hired for can fall through / get cancelled by the client. 
I dont know about you, but I receive too many offers to not decline them while I am vetting a client. 
And to accept all the attractive jobs and simply "schedule them" seems unrealistic and overly simplistic to me. No one can predict how long a job will take. Nor does this take the clients time table into account.


Joe H wrote:

Even jobs you have been hired for can fall through / get cancelled by the client. 
I dont know about you, but I receive too many offers to not decline them while I am vetting a client. 
And to accept all the attractive jobs and simply "schedule them" seems unrealistic and overly simplistic to me. No one can predict how long a job will take. Nor does this take the clients time table into account.


That's contractor life. It's good cuz who would want to work with the same people day in and day out. Wagies, that's who.


Joe H wrote:

Even jobs you have been hired for can fall through / get cancelled by the client. 
I dont know about you, but I receive too many offers to not decline them while I am vetting a client. 
And to accept all the attractive jobs and simply "schedule them" seems unrealistic and overly simplistic to me. No one can predict how long a job will take. Nor does this take the clients time table into account.


You can. You are the professional who knows how long it will take, and your client will need that information at the start. 

lysis10
Community Member

No I don't have this problem cuz I'm smart enough not to bank on promises and I talk to errrrryone. Even scammers cuz sometimes you need some fun in your day.

radiojay
Community Member

Can I offer my advice on this?

 

Why not "go back and re-apply for the jobs you declined if they are still open? "

 

I have to say, thank you for bringing this to mind. This made me think about what I do.It starts with thinking about this differently. My approach may shed some light, without feeling like you are being 'dinged' twice with penalties.

 

I always see upworks "suggested jobs" as more of them in a search for who has interest in this type of gig being offered by the client. Not the job itself. So instead of declining, I always enter a bid! BUT I do it at a higher rate! This is all knowing that I will find the time for a big payday.

 

Never turn down work as a business. You have to be their for your clients. They have a need, and we will meet it. Especially if it is a gig you offer that you love/find easy as a task.

 

Raise your bid, be sure to be making it worthwhile for yourself.

 

Then as needed, just like when applying for a career in the interview process, if you have multiple offers it lets you negotiate with your current 'employeer'.

 

Now if you are already working 240+ hours in a week that is a different conversation. But I hope this is helpful in the 'bigger' game of Upwork's bots finding interested workers vs self-work-time vs cash.

 

Beat the algorthym.

 

Boost your offer price when busy. Not decline. Turn down the low-paying gigs.

 

Ask questions, bring up specifics if you have a story. I'm glad to chat!

-Jordan

VO

Producer

Marketing

Youtuber

Author

Designer

Bee Keeper

bilal1983
Community Member

If you're referring to job invites... and you see multiple good opportunities, respond to the one that you like the most. do not decline the other good ones.

 

Accept the invite and that will enable you to intract with them through Upwork messenger. Tell them you're interested in the position, but you're currently tied up in other work.

 

But let them know that you'd like to stay in touch, because your schedule and theirs might change, or ask them if you could start later, or any other well-worded message.

 

Basically, never decline a good job invite before accepting it, and having them on chat, so that you can reach out to them later.

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