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prowriterusa
Community Member

Pay Rates for Jobs

Suggestion.

We as freelancers want to see the clients budget for the actual job, not the total rate  if they are hiring many freelancers for one job post. If the client says the budget is $500, we should know if that is the rate for that actual assignment. When I click on more info on the client I see something that says average rate per hour. What a dissapointment when I see a job may only be 15 or less per hour. I personally work on a flat fee anyway and charge for the value I bring to the client accordingly. UpWork, please make the change so we can weed out low paying jobs. 

 

ACCEPTED SOLUTION


Leslie C wrote:

Your system should change. Clients are not misleading or being tactiful, unless they just want eyeballs and think the  high numbers applying will attract the best talent- only to truly dissapoint a better qualified who can demand higher fees. If they say a budget is $1000 and the pay for one article is $20 for 1000 words, that - at least for the US market is well below minumum wage between time, research, editing etc.   Don't get me wrong, there is a lot of good talent out there in all fee structures- and we all set our own fees technically by choice to accept the job or not. The lack of true transparency is not in order here on the platform. No problem listing the budget, but make them also place at least a range for the one article for example for that job.  


They are not going to do that since it only applies to a fraction of jobs on upwork. Not everything is based on articles. 

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5 REPLIES 5
tlbp
Community Member

Clients who list a large budget, knowing that it will be split across multiple articles know exactly what they are doing. The misdirection is intentional. I agree that it renders filtering fixed priced gigs by budget useless.

However, even if Upwork were able to screen the text of the posts to detect this type of budget exaggeration, the "clients" who use this device would just switch tactics. The likely result would be that you would waste time arranging an interview and then find out that they wanted multiple pieces for the stated price. 

Your system should change. Clients are not misleading or being tactiful, unless they just want eyeballs and think the  high numbers applying will attract the best talent- only to truly dissapoint a better qualified who can demand higher fees. If they say a budget is $1000 and the pay for one article is $20 for 1000 words, that - at least for the US market is well below minumum wage between time, research, editing etc.   Don't get me wrong, there is a lot of good talent out there in all fee structures- and we all set our own fees technically by choice to accept the job or not. The lack of true transparency is not in order here on the platform. No problem listing the budget, but make them also place at least a range for the one article for example for that job.  


Leslie C wrote:

Your system should change. Clients are not misleading or being tactiful, unless they just want eyeballs and think the  high numbers applying will attract the best talent- only to truly dissapoint a better qualified who can demand higher fees. If they say a budget is $1000 and the pay for one article is $20 for 1000 words, that - at least for the US market is well below minumum wage between time, research, editing etc.   Don't get me wrong, there is a lot of good talent out there in all fee structures- and we all set our own fees technically by choice to accept the job or not. The lack of true transparency is not in order here on the platform. No problem listing the budget, but make them also place at least a range for the one article for example for that job.  


They are not going to do that since it only applies to a fraction of jobs on upwork. Not everything is based on articles. 


Leslie C wrote:

....Clients are not misleading or being tactiful, unless they just want eyeballs and think the  high numbers applying will attract the best talent- only to truly dissapoint a better qualified who can demand higher fees. If they say a budget is $1000 and the pay for one article is $20 for 1000 words, that - at least for the US market is well below minumum wage between time, research, editing etc.   Don't get me wrong, there is a lot of good talent out there in all fee structures- and we all set our own fees technically by choice to accept the job or not. The lack of true transparency is not in order here on the platform. No problem listing the budget, but make them also place at least a range for the one article for example for that job.  


Believing all prospective clients act in good faith is naive. Luckily, as has been said, the strategems of the deceitful ones are usually obvious.

Trying to imagine clients' thought processes is risky and pointless. A better focus is to compare their statements against their summary profile (which includes how much they've paid to how many freelancers), their hiring history, and their reviews. 
Minimum wage is not relevant to independent contracting. As you correctly point out, we set our own fees, and decide to accept work or not. We also decide which job posts represent legitimate work from serious prospects, and are worth pursuing. Due diligence includes deciding which posts are worth more than a glance and which not.

roberty1y
Community Member

The figure you see at the top of the post is often deceptive, and there's not much you can do about it. Sometimes it's for that job alone, while in other cases it could be the budget for a whole year's work. As Douglas says, looking at the client's job history is a good way of determining how much they're likely to pay. But the average hourly rate they pay isn't necessarily a good guide. Sometimes a client might pay an average of $20 an hour, but $50 an hour for one particular type of work. You need to look in their job history for the type of work you do and see how much they pay for it.

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