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tlbp
Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
11 of 23

When you are desperate for income, Upwork is not a good solution.  Yes, you may land gigs, but you also place your fate in the hands of a system that isn't designed for quick feedback or payment. Wanting a problem to be solved because you personally need it to be solved doesn't move the needle when dealing with large corporate policies. 

 

You are assuming your application won't be selected by the client, but you cannot know whether your assumption is true or false. If you are talented and can write an effective cover letter, then apply for the jobs that are a good fit for your skills. If you don't, you can't blame the lack of a RT badge for your lack of gigs. 

 

Most of the job skills sections on Upwork are saturated with freelancers. A badge or not is the least of what is standing in your way when you are a beginner here. To succeed you have to be able to dive in and make the sale. 

Target the jobs you want, write the best cover letter you can and hope for a little luck. But know that hundreds, if not thousands, of other freelancers are doing the same.  

 

 

 

 

lrmessing
Ace Contributor
Lisa M Member Since: Apr 11, 2017
12 of 23

Thanks for your feedback, Tonya. But I do know all of that already. 😉 I didn't say that I'm not applying for jobs that request a RT badge, only that it's highly unlikely that I'll get a response without it, since I've gotten almost none with it. Think of it on par with the 9-5 working world - if there are dozens of candidates applying for a job, the employer has no earthly reason to look at applications of those whose resumes, which are first run through an automated system called the ATS, don't contain the key words that they've specified in their job listing. Those resumes immediately go into the circular file.

 

I'm fully aware of the pitfalls of trying to break into freelance editing, especially with competition from all over the world, including regions where freelancers can charge 1/3 of what we in the U.S. charge. (And before you respond to tell me about the 'U.S. only' option, yes, I use it, but there are many fewer editing and proofreading jobs posted there.) I never expected Upwork to solve anything for me, but I did expect that it could provide a little extra income while I continue to find other, more stable work. I've done everything suggested and remained persistant, so I don't really appreciate lectures. Apparently this community is much like the internet in general - there will always be people who need to feel authoritative and as if they have the answers, but this is not a helpful approach when addressing a specific issue.

 

But thanks for taking the time to respond anyway.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
13 of 23

@Lisa M wrote:

It was hourly (4 hrs) and I entered time manually. 


Then you are paid automatically.  

 

The only way you would not be paid automatically would be because you used manual time rather than tracking your time in the following cases:

 

  • the client disputes (manual time is not protected, correctly tracked time is)
  • The client’s payment method fails (manual time is not protected, correctly tracked time is)
  • the client files a chargeback (manual time is not protected, correctly tracked time is)
lrmessing
Ace Contributor
Lisa M Member Since: Apr 11, 2017
14 of 23

Thanks Petra. I thought, when I saw that manual time was not protected, that this meant that if the client chooses not to pay, that I don't get paid.But good to know that I will.

 

I just don't know what to think about this client - he seemed legit, had a few other jobs in process, we communicated while I was doing his work, but stopped responding as soon as I sent him his last paper 2 days ago, even though I've messaged him twice asking if he was happy with the work or needed anything changed, etc.

 

How long do you wait before realizing that you've been taken advantage of? It's only been 2 days - maybe he's just busy. But if not, shouldn't he be reported? And if he never responds, I don't get feedback, which affects my likelihood of being hired again.

 

Anyway, thanks for clearing up the payment issue. Of course it's under $100, so I can't access it until I complete another job, which is going to be harder to get now without feedback or a RT badge.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
15 of 23

@Lisa M wrote:

How long do you wait before realizing that you've been taken advantage of? It's only been 2 days -

 

Of course it's under $100, so I can't access it until I complete another job, which is going to be harder to get now without feedback or a RT badge.


 How can you have been taken advantage of if you are paid automatically? 2 days is nothing, leave the poor guy in peace!

 

You can withdraw any time, you do not have to wait until you have $ 100... You can go to Reports - Available and click on the great big green "Get Paid Now" button and withdraw whatever available (!) earnings you have. $ 100 is just the threshold for *automatic, scheduled* withdrawals.

lrmessing
Ace Contributor
Lisa M Member Since: Apr 11, 2017
16 of 23

Leave him in peace? I'm not harassing him. I sent him his last paper and waited for a thank you or any response at all. Then a day later I sent a brief message asking if all was well and if he was happy with the work, because his deadline was the previous evening.

 

If a freelancer completes a job and the client doesn't pay, regardless of whether or not Upwork takes on that responsibility, it seems worth mentioning. I don't know if that's the case here, which is simply why I asked how long you wait to hear from a client after submitting work.

 

But I'm over it and moving on. Thanks for the info about "Get Paid Now."

 

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
17 of 23

@Lisa M wrote:

If a freelancer completes a job and the client doesn't pay,

 


 It is an hourly job. The client does not "pay" - the client is automatically charged for the hours logged (manually or using the app) according to the payment schedule - the client could not "pay" in advance if he tried!


It seems you are not familiar with how hourly contracts are paid

sam-sly
Community Guru
Samantha S Member Since: Jun 23, 2016
18 of 23

Lisa, as mentioned hourly jobs are paid on a specific schedule, so it isn't immediate.  I usually work fixed-rate contracts and only had a few hourly, so my memory might be rusty.  The period contains a whole work week, I think it ends on Sunday at a specific time.  The client gets a few days to review the hours and dispute (if the client feels the time wasn't spent on the project). I don't recall whether there is a security holding period for hourly contracts? The payment for hourly projects is released on a specific day every week (I think Wednesday?). 

 

From what you describe, I don't think there is any reason to assume the client "scammed" you. If the client disputes your time, then you will probably lose since the time was manually logged (you will want to be careful about manual time). Nothing you mentioned makes me think this client would do that to you.

 

There are in fact scammers who post jobs on this platform, so it is important to read Upwork's help files about payment for both hourly and fixed rate projects. Most scammers count on freelancers who willingly violate terms of conditions or who don't know how the system works.

 
sam-sly
Community Guru
Samantha S Member Since: Jun 23, 2016
19 of 23

About Rising Talent...

 

I didn't get the rising talent badge initially and I still won contracts. If I saw a project that interested me, I would just bid.

 

I know some people get it right away, but in my case, I didn't receive it until I already won about four contracts. I had 5/5 feedback from one (who also paid a bonus and left a nice review) and I believe the other contracts were in progress at the time.  The badge may help in some cases, but it isn't the "make or break" that some freelancers assume. It is better to focus on a good profile, good portfolio samples, and writing good proposals. You can control those things, I don't think there is really anything you can do to control whether you have the "rising talent" badge (other than meeting the basic criteria and doing well with the contracts you do win).

 
lrmessing
Ace Contributor
Lisa M Member Since: Apr 11, 2017
20 of 23

Well, hopefully I'm meeting all those criteria - good profile, portfolio and proposals, so will focus on that and see what happens. Plus my first client responded to my request and gave me 5 stars, so at least I've got something now.

 

Thanks!

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