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paperdog
Member

Seen this often

I have noticed more frequent job postings where the descriptions are brief and always end like this:

"This job was posted from a mobile device, so please pardon any typos or any missing details."

DO legitimate clients really post serious jobs like that?   (They must do business out of a traveling car... or maybe they want to impress an entourage?)  

24 REPLIES 24
pandoraharper
Member


@Grant C wrote:

I have noticed more frequent job postings where the descriptions are brief and always end like this:

"This job was posted from a mobile device, so please pardon any typos or any missing details."

DO legitimate clients really post serious jobs like that?   (They must do business out of a traveling car... or maybe they want to impress an entourage?)  


Big thread right here about this (and multiple search results right here via the SEARCH bar):

https://community.upwork.com/t5/Freelancers/quot-This-job-was-posted-from-a-mobile-device-so-please-...

 

 

 

Thanks guru Pandora.   ... but not really helpful.  Have you actually checked the solution on that thread?  ANd it certainly doesnt bear the same interesting discussion that this one seems to have sparked. 

essa_alroc
Member

It's not the client. It's Upwork. Some kind of auto-script for mobile posters. 


@Stephanie L wrote:

It's not the client. It's Upwork. Some kind of auto-script for mobile posters. 


 But, it's the client (often--some clients do better) posting a one-sentence job description.

I was simply speaking to the end-note "this job was posted from a mobile device, so please pardon any typos or any missing details."  This is absolutely a script. 

 

As for 'one sentence job descriptions', that's not what he said. He just said brief. One man's “brief” is another man’s novel. As a writer, I tend to expect that my clients lack writing skills. Otherwise, they wouldn’t be posting for help in my category. Our job postings in writing tend to be succinct so I don't necessarily view them as a red flag. More like a cry for help 🙂 


@Stephanie L wrote:

I was simply speaking to the end-note "this job was posted from a mobile device, so please pardon any typos or any missing details."  This is absolutely a script. 

 

As for 'one sentence job descriptions', that's not what he said. He just said brief. One man's “brief” is another man’s novel. As a writer, I tend to expect that my clients lack writing skills. Otherwise, they wouldn’t be posting for help in my category. Our job postings in writing tend to be succinct so I don't necessarily view them as a red flag. More like a cry for help 🙂 


This is how I feel about it, too.

 

I could probably easily change my own oil. I know where to buy an oil pan. I know where to buy oil. I know how to measure how high the oil is on the stick. I'm flexible, thin and can easily get underneath cars. I know how to unscrew and re-screw a...thingie. (Leftie-loosie rightie-tightie, right? Done. Give me a tool, I've got this.)

 

I don't, though. I HATE the idea of doing it. Just hate it.

 

So I hand some dude my credit card, invite him to get down to it, and I grab myself a Starbucks and read until it's all over but the shouting.

 

If my oil changer dude said "If she's so lazy she can't be arsed to even try to change her own oil, I don't want her as a client" I'm sure in very short time indeed, he'd no longer be eating. Smiley LOL I'm 99% sure he's thinking instead, "Thank God for lazy people who don't like dirty hands." The remaining 1% secretly believes he's raging inwardly at the lunacy of a physically and mentally able person not bothering to change her own oil.

 

 

That is probably the best metaphor I've ever read to describe this situation! 🙂 For the most part, any freelancer with white collar skills tends to have at least some kind of writing ability -- what most people don't understand is that many get it from hiring it. I've gained many great jobs and ongoing contracts from those vague two-sentence postings from people who don't have particularly strong writing skills.  The lack of writing ability does not equal a lack of business acumen. 

 

But I will admit I don't like the Upwork auto-script for mobile. From what I can tell, it's causing more problems than it resolves.  

Melanie, 

Great analogy on briefs & novels. (and I  totatally agree)     I cant speak to writing jobs, but with coding or technical based jobs, its an absolute must that the requirements and specs are clear.  Unfortunately, while some clients may actually articulate their needs with clarity, many dont always understand why or why not some of their requirements are feasable.   So, the more information they can provide, the more the propensity exists for a  solution, at less cost for them. 

That's interesting, Stephanie. I am also a writer, and I'll bypass a badly written job post every time. My take is that if the client can't articulate what he wants, it's going to be much more time consuming and frustrating to satisfy him. And, if someone can't write a decent English sentence, I definitely don't want him editing and rating my writing.

 

I love to see posts like yours because when I taught writing and led workshops for young writers, my mantra was always that you have to find what works for you--never, ever believe an experienced writer who tells you his/her way is the only way. The fact that you and I are both successful with totally opposite approaches on this issue is just one example of that.

Melanie/Stephanie: I don't think that's an apt analogy, and here's why...

 

When you take your car in to get the oil changed, you want your car to have fresh oil in it. If you leave with a clean air filter, the oil cap firmly in place and your car running smoothly, you're happy.

 

The oil change isn't your end goal--it's just how you get to your goal. This holds true across many freelancing disciplines, too. If I hire someone to create an app, I want the app to do what I asked for. I'm not going to dig into the code and make changes that break the app or rate the programmer because my totally inexperienced and unqualified view is that he should have used modules instead of a block system (those probably aren't even applicable terms).

 

However, writing clients who barely speak English DO judge and rate and make changes to writing based on the "code," with no more understanding than I have of Ruby on Rails (if that's still a thing).

Ruby on the Rails is absolutely a thing. For beginning programmers. So if someone came to me, with no experience in programming whatsoever and said the same thing you just did, I'd accept the fact that maybe they didn't understand the process. Maybe they're just a beginner. Maybe Java isn't their first language and they need some help. I'd get that's why they're coming to look for help in Upwork in the first place. 

 

And yes, when you go to get your oil changed, having it changed is your end goal. You don't care about the process. You care about results. So you pay the money and you get results.  That's what Upwork is for. 

 

In the writing category, it's very common to have clients who don't know how to write. So I don't write them off. I don't have to take their work, but at the very least, I can give them a chance without writing them off because Upwork chose to tack on some nonsense disclaimer because they dared post a job from their iPhone. I check their profile, I see if the work interests me and if so, I apply. 

 

Also, I'm not apologizing to anyone and you clearly don't know how to work a metaphor. No wonder Upwork has a constant need for writers. 

Stephanie, you'll note that I said "analogy," not "metaphor"--you know, not the fuzzy, "I'm kind of creating an impression here that should instill an emotional response, even though it's not factually parallel," but a logical comparison. As a former attorney and a former teacher of logic, I have an excellent command of analogies, and really hate faulty ones.

 

I'm not sure why you decided that you needed to be personally insulting, but since you seem to be suggesting that my inability to grasp metaphors is the reason there's a need for writers on Upwork (there isn't--Upwork is turning away new writer applicants right and left due to the glut), it's worth noting that I'm doing quite well at triple your hourly rate. Your posted hourly rate, I mean, not the much lower one you're actually accepting.

 

 

We all do out own thing. Best of luck with yours. 


@Grant C wrote:

I have noticed more frequent job postings where the descriptions are brief and always end like this:

"This job was posted from a mobile device, so please pardon any typos or any missing details."

DO legitimate clients really post serious jobs like that?   (They must do business out of a traveling car... or maybe they want to impress an entourage?)  


I was taken aback too the first time I saw this (before looking it up to discover it's automatic) but I didn't really think it meant the postings weren't legitimate. My main area is writing, and people are posting jobs because they either can't, or don't want to, write. 🙂 So it stands to reason that the listings may not be professional-writer caliber.

 

And don't forget, these people aren't necessarily companies, either. Sometimes the post is down to an individual wanting text for her personal wedding images site. These are just people. They're not necessarily pros in any arena delivered here to clients...they ARE the clients...and if they could do all this perfectly, they wouldn't need us. 🙂

 

And by the way, the above wall of text took me all of, I don't know, probably 40, 45 seconds to write. Okay, maybe a full minute. I type FAST. On a desktop/laptop. If I were posting from my phone, with my weirdly fat Fred Flintstone thumbs, going back and correcting through my Anti-H Bomb super-duper thick plexi phone coating, hitting the same letter 10 times to get it to show up once and then having it myseriously type three of those letters anyway...God knows I'd be keeping things short on my job listing, LOL.

 

 

pandoraharper
Member

I think that Grant C was simply wondering if REAL clients post these jobs, or are they all posted by scammy clients.

 

Because apparently, he thinks maybe these clients are either driving somewhere, or hoping to somehow (through the use of a phone?) impress some people? Not sure what that really means, but from a newish persons perspective, it's a valid concern.

 

I'm sure there are all sorts of reasons these clients use their phones to post jobs. Hopefully for neither of those reasons though.

 

When I see these jobs my first thought is always "Wow, you could not find the time to sit in front of a computer and send this? If your really THAT busy, I'm not interested in working for you." I never assume these are scam jobs.


@Pandora H wrote:

 

When I see these jobs my first thought is always "Wow, you could not find the time to sit in front of a computer and send this? If your really THAT busy, I'm not interested in working for you." I never assume these are scam jobs.


Oh gosh, I never think that.

 

Job security.

 

Thank God there are people who really, really hate to write. 😉 😄

pandoraharper
Member

Gosh, what happened in here?

 

For the record, as someone who needs usually a full 30 days of "discovery" with clients who have 0 documentation, I have to speak to them often, initially.

 

I've fired clients who I warned that I would need 2-3 hours a week AT least the first 2 weeks, of their time, who then said "you mean you can't just get this data through osmosis?"

 

..........................Uh...no? You want my help, you gotta give me at least a few crumbs.

 

So that's why I would not work for those "mobile" clients.  I'm sure some of them are fine people.

For the record, I was just explaining a technical glitch in that Upwork sends out the same message for all those who post a job with under so many characters while using mobile.   

 

Then, everyone else had to chime in with how they were the bestest, most researched writer on the interwebs and things went downhill from there. 

 

When really, we all could have just said to OP "it's an upwork glitch."

Like I already did


@Stephanie L wrote:

For the record, I was just explaining a technical glitch in that Upwork sends out the same message for all those who post a job with under so many characters while using mobile.   

 

Then, everyone else had to chime in with how they were the bestest, most researched writer on the interwebs and things went downhill from there. 

 

When really, we all could have just said to OP "it's an upwork glitch."


 No...

 

...that would have been tooooo easy.

 

Smiley Very Happy

But to be entirely fair, this post wouldn't have been much fun if it was about nothing but tech specs. I commented on a strict tech specs post earlier and not one person called me the c-word or questioned my business practices while condescendingly acting like they were smarter than me once. It was pretty boring. 

 

I'm going to say it. I come to the forums for the drama.  😉 


@Stephanie L wrote:

For the record, I was just explaining a technical glitch in that Upwork sends out the same message for all those who post a job with under so many characters while using mobile.  


 No, it also adds it to very long job posts if they were posted from a "mobile device" which, incidentally, may be a top of the range iPad Pro for all we know.

 

Not everything posted from a mobile device was hastily typed out on a mobile phone by some hick while driving a truck....

 

And to round it off: It is no “technical glitch” either. 


@Petra R wrote:

Not everything posted from a mobile device was hastily typed out on a mobile phone by some hick while driving a truck....


 Yes, I've seen some very well-written job descriptions from mobile devices.

 

But I don't respond to one-sentence job descriptions whether they're from mobiles or not. It's not so much that I want thoughtful clients, though that's a factor too. It's because all my successful proposals have been closely tailored to the client's specific needs, and I can't do that if the client doesn't give me any details. Obviously, this isn't going to apply equally to all types of work. I'm a software developer, not a writer.

Petra R wrote:   "Not everything posted from a mobile device was hastily typed out on a mobile phone by some hick while driving a truck....
 
And to round it off: It is no “technical glitch” either.  "

I guess you know your hicks pretty well.   

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