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Re: Should we withdraw our proposals after some amount of time?

babzward
Community Guru
Barbara W Member Since: Sep 10, 2015
1 of 19

I remember seeing in another thread (can't remember which, at the moment) something about withdrawing our proposals after xx amount of time (example, 2 weeks). Would you recommend doing this? And if so, under what circumstances?

 

My protocol so far has been as follows - and I wonder if it's a good method or if it could stand to be improved:

 

- For job listings that haven't responded to me in about 3 weeks, I withdraw the proposal.

- For clients that haven't continued with the interview process after about 3 weeks (but I'm still in "active candidacy") - I send a follow-up message.

- For former clients who expressed an interest in rehiring me, but haven't reached out to me in two weeks - I send a message following up.

 

I seem to recall something about getting bids or connects back when we withdraw the proposals - but I haven't noticed anything to back that up. Was that just before the merge or something and I'm reading outdated information?

- Barbara Herrera -
colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
BEST ANSWER
2 of 19

You only get your connects back if Upwork delists the job or if the client cancels it.

 

There is (are?) a thread about this, I'll try and find it. Upwork generally archives unanswered proposals after a certain length of time (I think it's about 60 days) and will definitely archive a proposal that gets awarded to someone else.

 

I wish we were able to archive our own proposals (whatever the outcome) because sometimes clients come back to one ages after their jobs have been archived, and then it is really difficult trying to find one's original proposal.

View solution in original post

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
3 of 19

You do not get connects back when you withdraw, so there is no advantage in doing so at all. 

 

 

babzward
Community Guru
Barbara W Member Since: Sep 10, 2015
4 of 19

So... it's entirely unnecessary?

 

I believe the post I read before mentioned that clients may be checking to see if you're paying attention, and withdrawing the proposal can make you appear in higher demand than you may actually be. (Although admittedly, my hours are currently pretty full, and the only proposals I've withdrawn recently [as in the last couple of days] are ones that I'm no longer interested in based on my current availability.)

 

Are either of those reasons valid for withdrawing a proposal - or does it still serve no purpose except "cleaning house"?

- Barbara Herrera -
stencil_media
Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
5 of 19

@Barbara W wrote:

 

...clients may be checking to see if you're paying attention, and withdrawing the proposal can make you appear in higher demand than you may actually be.


Playing hard to get may work in relationships, but I don't think it's ever been recommended when it comes to sales and marketing! (Sure, there's something to be said for making out that your product or service is in high demand, limited supply, you only work with a select few etc etc... but this is more like removing the 'buy now' button from whatever you're selling!) I mean, if you submit a proposal then there's no reason for a client to doubt that you're interested in working with them on their project. If you withdraw your proposal then they might think, and rightly so, that you're just not interested anymore. 

 

As for being too busy... what if you've just been awarded a one month full time project, and the project you've just withdrawn from would have been awarded one month and one day later? Sure, maybe it's not a good idea to submit a proposal if you're ultra busy, but if it's already in, therte's not much point in removing it. You don't get penalised for declining a job offer. 

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
droleary
Community Guru
Darrin O Member Since: Jan 20, 2015
6 of 19

@Scott E wrote:
Playing hard to get may work in relationships, but I don't think it's ever been recommended when it comes to sales and marketing!

And you'd be wrong.  Is Tesla "playing hard to get" when they won't sell me a car for $500?  Does a pub not want my business because they demand I show my ID?  No, it's just they way they have to do business.  You don't have to do business any particular way on Upwork when it comes to withdrawing proposals, but you should at least consciously think about your brand as you interact with the platform.


I mean, if you submit a proposal then there's no reason for a client to doubt that you're interested in working with them on their project.

Which is why I withdraw my proposal when it is clear the client isn't interested in working with me.  That's my brand.  I'm not here just to wait for some anonymous job poster to get serious about getting things done.  They posted and I took action.  Professionally, the ball is in their court.  If they don't act, I will.  That's the message I choose to send when I withdraw my proposals.


If you withdraw your proposal then they might think, and rightly so, that you're just not interested anymore.

Not interested in sitting around idle?  More "clients" on Upwork should get that message . . .

 

babzward
Community Guru
Barbara W Member Since: Sep 10, 2015
7 of 19

Thanks for all the input, everyone. It seems like there's a bit of a debate here on withdrawing. General consensus I see is that a) it provides no official benefit, but b) it can be helpful in terms of enforcing a particular image... Regardless of whether that image is positively or negatively viewed by the client.

- Barbara Herrera -
droleary
Community Guru
Darrin O Member Since: Jan 20, 2015
8 of 19

@Barbara W wrote:

it can be helpful in terms of enforcing a particular image


I feel a need to put a finer point on this.  Brand is about more than just your external image.  Volkswagen forgot that, and look at what happened to them.  How you act is first and foremost a reflection of who you are.  I'm someone who prefers loose ends to be tied up when possible, so I withdraw dead-end proposals.  In the same way, I keep my books in regular balance rather than throwing everything into a shoebox and waiting until the end of the year to sort it out with my accountant.  It's just how I work; it's not a question of what is right or wrong or who might see it as positive or negative.  Similarly, my approach to business means I'm never ever going bug my idle client's to close their contracts, regardless of how much I know Upwork dings me for not drinking their flawed JSS kool-aid.

 

stencil_media
Community Guru
Scott E Member Since: Jul 26, 2015
9 of 19

Pricing products at an appropriate rate isn't playing hard to get. Due dilligence when it comes to alcohol sales so you don't end up in prison or with a hefty fine, isn't playing hard to get. Withdrawing a proposal from a project you want to work on, with the intention of making you seem more appealing, is playing hard to get. And I think it's slightly misguided as well. 

 

 

 

 

"Welcome, humans. I'm ready for you!"
- Box, Logan's Run (1976)
droleary
Community Guru
Darrin O Member Since: Jan 20, 2015
10 of 19

@Scott E wrote:

Pricing products at an appropriate rate isn't playing hard to get. Due dilligence when it comes to alcohol sales so you don't end up in prison or with a hefty fine, isn't playing hard to get.


Right.  Same is true, though, for any decision to run a business that doesn't meet the demands of absolutely 100% of the market.  That's my point.  Nobody is play hard to get just because they don't behave the way you want them to behave.


Withdrawing a proposal from a project you want to work on, with the intention of making you seem more appealing, is playing hard to get.

Then it's a good thing you've been able to read that that is not my intention, so I'm not sure why you bring it up.

 

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