jmccpa
Member

Since Upworks eliminated details of bids.

How many posters agree with me that since UP eliminated the details of each bid that they find they are bidding on substantially fewer jobs?

 

After returning from a time out period, I am down from about 5-10 a day to about 1-3 a day.

 

Joe

Joseph M. C. ,P.C., CPA/ABV
14 REPLIES 14
lysis10
Member

I bid less but make more so I guess it balances out. I don't miss the details other than the occasional ego boost when I see that I'm so much better than my competitors.

versailles
Member


@Joseph C wrote:

How many posters agree with me that since UP eliminated the details of each bid that they find they are bidding on substantially fewer jobs?

 

After returning from a time out period, I am down from about 5-10 a day to about 1-3 a day.

 

Joe


It doesn't make a difference for me, I never looked at the bid details when they were avaiable. I don't really understand why you bid less?

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless

Hi Rene,

 

I have the highest hourly rate ($190) among CPAs.

 

Before, if I saw several bids from freelancers reasonably qualified (even if, as most, have less experience}. I would pass. If I saw most bids are from unqualified candidates, I submitted a bid.  I used to buy 20 connects several times a month.

 

Now, I am effectively bidding blind.  So I conserve my connects and bid only when I have unique qualifications that fit the job and feel the client will appreciate my qualifications and pay my price.

 

 

 

 

Joseph M. C. ,P.C., CPA/ABV


@Joseph C wrote:

Hi Rene,

 

 

Before, if I saw several bids from freelancers reasonably qualified (even if, as most, have less experience}. I would pass. If I saw most bids are from unqualified candidates, I submitted a bid. 

 


Interesting approach. The only problem is, you cannot control who will bid after you do, so it somehow defeats the purpose of this approach.

 

The posted rate is a double edged sword. It may scare clients away but it may also cast an image of higher value and expertise. Which may attract demanding clients. The reasonably qualified but cheaper competitors may lose the contract on this.

 

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless

I believe the approach worked fairly well as I was able to bill over $17,000 over 4-5 months as a new entrant in January.

Joseph M. C. ,P.C., CPA/ABV


@Joseph C wrote:
[I] bid only when I have unique qualifications that fit the job and feel the client will appreciate my qualifications and pay my price. 

 


Joe,

 

Yeah, me too. Been bidding that way for years.

So are you winning fewer contracts, or earning less?

If I spent less time bidding without any loss in income, I'd consider that a net gain.

 

Best,

Michael

Michael,

 

I had to take a few months time off to recover surgery.

 

Starting bidding about a week ago.  No interviews or jobs yet.

 

Joe

Joseph M. C. ,P.C., CPA/ABV

I think either model works. Currently, I have enough long-term jobs that I am not available.

 

When I was first starting out, I bid enough to need to purchase connects. I just made sure that I didn't go wild spending without landing any jobs for my troubles. I agree that I bid less due to bidding blind. Like Joe, under the past system, if I saw that someone else equally or more qualified had already bid on a job I was less likely to spend a connect on it.  

 

Joe,  jobs were down this summer and the higher fee was implemented. So, I have also diversified my client locating methods. 

mtngigi
Member

Not me ... I don't care what other freelancers are doing, and I am continually astounded at freelancers who find that many jobs to bid on in a day - but perhaps there are more jobs in your category.


@Virginia F wrote:

Not me ... I don't care what other freelancers are doing, and I am continually astounded at freelancers who find that many jobs to bid on in a day - but perhaps there are more jobs in your category.


Same here. I have not cared what other freelancers are doing / bidding since the very early days.

 

 I apply to a couple a month usually, occasionally more when I am bored (rarely) or there is a rare flurry of really juicy jobs.

 

Most of my work these days comes from ongoing contracts, invites and repeat / returning clients. 

tlsanders
Member

I never paid attention to the other bids and am not bidding any less, but I've always been bidding quite a bit less. There are a lot of months when I don't bid on ten jobs, and I'm sure that I've never bid on five in a day--rarely if ever five in a week.

The sheer idea of bidding on 5 to 10 jobs a day fills me with abject horror. 

 

I want  to spend my working days earning money, not bidding, faffing, interviewing, searching for more gigs etc etc etc.

 

The more time it takes to win an hour's work, the more that hour has to earn to make up for the time and money spent winning it.

 

Essentially there are different business models. Some want to spend more time (and money if buying connects) to win less but higher priced working hours (working hours include time spent on fixed rate contracts of course), some want a constant stream of income.

 

All that time and effort needs to be factored in. It makes little sense to spent the equivalent of 3 hours on winning one hour of work at a high price, when I could be spending those three hours earning half the hourly rate, but with 0 overhead, hence realistically working at a significantly higher hourly rate....

 

The trick is to find the "sweet spot" price-wise which results in the highest return on investment (money and time) 

Anonymous User
Not applicable
This widget could not be displayed.

I am interested to get much information about jobs and clients. To know the client's name address and time zone (legal reasons), to know my competitors (just because I am curious and because I often detected fake profiles this way). I want to see the spendings and hourly rates of the client in the invitation, because I would never apply to a job offer where the client did not pay well in the past.

 

Moreover, I would like to be updated what is going on in a talent group (for example to know why a project is not getting off the ground) instead of following-up several times in vain and getting a cryptical response in the end.  

 

I do not expect to be told any secrets but I expect more transparency. This is a matter of respect towards freelancers, something I am used to in business and I expect this on Upwork as well.

I have come to realize that there is an ebb and flow as it pertains to job flow, bidding success, etc.  Not having the bidding information isn't important to me.  I think you will go crazy trying to read the mind of the client.  Having a bidding strategy might work one day and not the next.  Clients view applicants in their own way, with their own biases and assessments.  Stand by your personal experience and your previous job successes and the client will decide in their own way, who is best for their job.