🐈
» Forums » Freelancers » Some ways to identify fake clients on Upwork
Page options
9072d126
Community Member

Some ways to identify fake clients on Upwork

  • Unverified status. If a client is not verified, it's a red flag. Verification is a simple process that involves providing Upwork with documentation to prove your identity and address. Clients who are unwilling to go through this process are more likely to be scammers.
  • History of cheap payments to previous freelancers. You can check a client's feedback score to see how they have rated previous freelancers. If you see a lot of feedback about late or missing payments, that's a sign that the client is not trustworthy.
  • Low hire rate. A client with a low hire rate is less likely to be serious about finding a freelancer. They may be sending out proposals to multiple freelancers without any intention of hiring anyone.
  • Vague job descriptions. If a job description is very vague and doesn't provide specific details about the work that needs to be done, that's a sign that the client is not serious about the project.
  • Requests for free work. If a client asks for a sample or test work without payment, that's a red flag. Legitimate clients should be willing to pay for your work, even if it's just a small upfront deposit.
  • Poor communication. Fake clients might have poor language skills, be unresponsive, or unprofessional in their interactions.
  • Unrealistic expectations. If a client has unrealistic expectations about the scope of work, budget, or deadline, that's a sign that they may not be legitimate.
ACCEPTED SOLUTION

You can not survive if you do not invest.

 

This is an excellent point. If you do not have the money to invest in your business to freelance, you will fail. I don't make the world's rules, or I would change everything to be pleasant and fair for all. Obviously, I don't have that kind of power.

 

Freelancing means you pay for everything, including job access. No matter where or how I contact a new client, no one pays for my expenses.

 

Be extremely selective and use your vetting skill to rule out jobs and clients that are never going to hire. If that means there are no jobs to apply to, then you don't apply. Never boost, unless you are an expert in the skills, can complete the job perfectly, and know you are one of the top two people who will apply - then, if you really want the job, you boost, if you wish.

View solution in original post

7 REPLIES 7
khadija_sheikh24
Community Member

I have seen a lot of scam job these days on Upwork.No real job even some people copy old job description and paste with their names,no hire and vanished.Some post duplicate job post.Some place job ad,take few interviews and that's it.No hire.The situation is really frustrating on Upwork.Moreover,16 connects need to apply for a job.You can not survive if you do not invest.Its difficult for newbies to invest on connects or to become freelancer plus member.It such a daunting task to get job on Upwork now.

You can not survive if you do not invest.

 

This is an excellent point. If you do not have the money to invest in your business to freelance, you will fail. I don't make the world's rules, or I would change everything to be pleasant and fair for all. Obviously, I don't have that kind of power.

 

Freelancing means you pay for everything, including job access. No matter where or how I contact a new client, no one pays for my expenses.

 

Be extremely selective and use your vetting skill to rule out jobs and clients that are never going to hire. If that means there are no jobs to apply to, then you don't apply. Never boost, unless you are an expert in the skills, can complete the job perfectly, and know you are one of the top two people who will apply - then, if you really want the job, you boost, if you wish.

Thank you so much Jeanne to support my answer.

These are great helpful tips.I will keep in mind when applying to new jobs.Thank you so much for your response.

the-right-writer
Community Member

 

  • Unverified status. If a client is not verified, it's a red flag. Verification is a simple process that involves providing Upwork with documentation to prove your identity and address. Clients who are unwilling to go through this process are more likely to be scammers

Verified status? Do you mean verified payment?  If you mean verified payment, it means nothing. If Upwork did check on the address, etc. it's very easy to fake.

 

 

  • History of cheap payments to previous freelancers. You can check a client's feedback score to see how they have rated previous freelancers. If you see a lot of feedback about late or missing payments, that's a sign that the client is not trustworthy.

 

 

No, it means they are cheap, not unreliable. They are very different things.

 

 

  • Vague job descriptions. If a job description is very vague and doesn't provide specific details about the work that needs to be done, that's a sign that the client is not serious about the project.

Clients are notorious for vague job descriptions, or now, a wall of chatbot text. Vague or incomplete descriptions do not rule them out. I have had excellent clients that had little in the job description.

 

  • Requests for free work. If a client asks for a sample or test work without payment, that's a red flag. Legitimate clients should be willing to pay for your work, even if it's just a small upfront deposit.

It's not a red flag, it's a violation of the Terms of Service. Clients can't ask for free work.

 

I have no idea what you mean by an upfront deposit. There is no such thing on Upwork. The only time you should work with a client is after thoroughly vetting the client, the job, and  having an Upwork contract that is funded with clear definitions, whether hourly or fixed price.

 

 

  • Poor communication. Fake clients might have poor language skills, be unresponsive, or unprofessional in their interactions.

Because this is a worldwide platform, there are many people who don't speak English as a first language. Do not be so quick to dismiss a potentially great client because their language skills are poor. As long as we can figure out how to communicate, I don't care if my client speaks broken English. Why would anyone throw out a client because of imperfect language skills? If the client isn't communicating, and you have a contract, you have to figure out how to make it work. If the client is rude, oh well. If they are threatening or vulgar or cursing, then turn them into Upwork.

 

 

  • Unrealistic expectations. If a client has unrealistic expectations about the scope of work, budget, or deadline, that's a sign that they may not be legitimate.

No, it doesn't. It means the client may be cheap, need work done ASAP, or not understand how long or detailed the work is and how much pay it demands. I have applied for cheap jobs with my fees, and been hired. Clients don't have experience usually, and may need help from freelancers to get the contract in place.

 

You make a lot of sweeping generalizations. The truth is, there is no easy, quick, foolproof way for vetting clients and jobs. It takes skills and there is a learning curve. Usually, I can tell if a job is legitimate in seconds. You can't tell by looking at this or that. Vetting means learning about the scams so you can recognize them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

lysis10
Community Member

> unverified

 

Got to this point and stopped and laughed again at how bad ChatGPT is at this.

williamtcooper
Community Member

Sazzad,

 

Do you have a question? Otherwise click the Academy link for assistance.

Latest Articles
Top Upvoted Members