Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Test trials you're getting paid for

Highlighted
Active Member
Maryke G Member Since: Jul 21, 2016
1 of 6

Hi
I've just done my "first job" and actually feel very unhappy about it. I guess it's mainly that I'm angry with myself for shooting myself in the foot here. But to stay positive, I'll look at it as a learning curve and getting to know how to go about applying for jobs here on Upwork.

Firstly, I'm a graphic designer/typesetter.

The client invited me for an interview and asked to do a trial for an X amount. I did so and sent an highres pdf.
Yesterday the client asked for the open files and, not feeling comfortable with it, I sent it.
Today I get the reply that they're very happy with the design, but decided to go with appointing someone in-house at their company. This after I've been told that if they hire me, there would be future projects involved also.

Even though I'm getting paid a small amount for this, I feel I made a big mistake by sending them my open files.

Now, my question is, am I allowed to only supply lowres pdfs even when they pay for the test or place a watermark on a pdf? And also, may I refuse to supply open files on these trials and only supply open files in the case where I'm actually hired for the whole job?

It feels I've spent so much time on this trial and basically gave a layout design away for next to nothing now.

I would greatly appreciate your feedback and please no nasty comments – I'm well aware that I was stupid regarding this whole transaction.

Thanks

Highlighted
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
2 of 6

Maryke:

I'm sorry that you feel frustrated, but I'm afraid there is some kind of disconnect here.

 

You did a job, an you were paid for the work you did.

 

That is how Upwork is supposed to work.

 

If you're hired to do a job by a client, and the client pays you for your work, then the files you produced belong to the client.

 

All of the files. The high-resolution files. The work files. These are not your to decide what to do with. You are not doing the client a special favor by providing the file to her that you were paid to produce.

 

Unless you make a special agreement to the contrary, this is how it works. This is stated specifically in Upwork's ToS.

 

When I am hired to work for a client, I am happy to continually provide the client with all files I produce on her behalf while doing the work. While getting paid money by the client.

 

If you feel like you did not charge this client enough, then ask for more money next time.

Highlighted
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
3 of 6

re: "Now, my question is, am I allowed to only supply lowres pdfs even when they pay for the test or place a watermark on a pdf?"

 

No.

 

re: "And also, may I refuse to supply open files on these trials and only supply open files in the case where I'm actually hired for the whole job?"

 

No.

 

There is no "whole job."

 

You're either hired to do work, or you're not hired to do work.

 

If a client says they want to pay you to do a test job and there may be future work, what this means is "they want to pay you to do a test job."

 

There IS NO FUTURE WORK unless they hire you to do that work.

 

No client owes you more work.

Highlighted
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
4 of 6

Consider this analogy:

 

I go to a restaurant.

 

I tell the restauraunt owner:

 

"Everything on the menu sounds delicious! I might just have to start coming here every week!"

 

I order a hamburger with a side of coleslaw.

 

I eat my meal and pay for it.

 

I don't return to the restaurant.

 

Restaurant owner:

"Did I make a mistake by serving this lousy customer the coleslaw? I should only have given him the burger. He said he would come here every week, and he hasn't! I feel like I have been ripped off."

Highlighted
Community Guru
Kim F Member Since: Aug 26, 2015
5 of 6

It’s not the same.

 

You don’t assume you’re entitled to a copy of the recipe and all the utensils used in making your burger.

 

@ OP This has been discussed several times before. It depends on exactly what you agreed. If you’ve agreed to supply a finished product, then that’s all that needs to be supplied.

 

For a genuine test, a low res pdf would be ample.

 

I assume you supplied an In Design file or similar? They have a template to use now. That’s likely to be what they were after.

Highlighted
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
6 of 6

Kim is right... It depends on what was agreed to....

 

If this was a fixed-price contract, then there should be an agreed-upon deliverable. You only need to supply what was agreed beforehand.

 

If you did not discuss what will be delivered, that was your mistake, and you need to deliver everything.

 

If this was an hourly contract, then you need to deliver everything unless otherwise discussed and unless another agreement was written and accepted by both sides.

 

The client in this situation did nothing wrong.

 

The contractor can learn from the experience and adjust pricing or decide to be more specific about deliverables in the future. The contractor can not expect everyone who hires her fo some work to hire her for more work after that, regardless of anything the client might imply about the future.

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS