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That's killing new freelancers!

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
21 of 95

If you spent a fraction of the time **Edited for Community Guidelines** on fixing your profile you'd stand a far better chance getting hired.

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
22 of 95

@Lahcen S wrote:

Thank you everyone.

Yes, I know that we all start from zero. I understand this. My point is, there are new freelancers who are as "top-rated" and "rising talent" freelancers in the matter of experience and skills, but since they have no work history or badges on Upwork they got ignored intentionally or not.


 We got your point. We're telling you that you're obviously wrong, since all of us were new freelancers with no work history or badges on Upwork at one time, and we all got hired and started moving forward here.

 

Sure, some clients prefer to work with experienced Upworkers. So what? Sometimes, that makes sense for the client. Obviously, there are plenty willing to work with a new freelancer who has the qualifications they're looking for, because we all go our starts.

jmlaidlaw
Community Guru
Janean L Member Since: Apr 6, 2016
23 of 95

@Lahcen S wrote:

Thank you everyone.

Yes, I know that we all start from zero. I understand this. My point is, there are new freelancers who are as "top-rated" and "rising talent" freelancers in the matter of experience and skills, but since they have no work history or badges on Upwork they got ignored intentionally or not.


 And your proposed solution to the problem/situation you have described is...?

cartrellgeneral
Community Guru
Catherine M Member Since: Jan 20, 2017
24 of 95

I disagree. If Upwork took my "Rising Talent" badge away right now or if I never get to "Top Rated", I still feel I would be able to get work when I want it. Why? I am confident in my experience and skills. I think you are using the "no work experience" and badges as an excuse for why some people do not succeed here. When I signed up on here, I got my first assignment fairly quickly and without much effort. I didn't have a badge or any work history on here but I have the skills required for select clients. It goes beyond knowing you can do the work but convincing the client that you have what it takes.

 

Bottomline for all new freelancers: Badges and Upwork experience is nice but not a huge factor if you can write great proposals and show your worth in the work you perform. It's the same thing in a physical work environment. Also, be honest with your potential client. Don't lie to get the job or falsify tests because those lies can and will catch up to you, eventually. Only apply to jobs you are confident you can complete successfully. And if all else fails, maybe Upwork is not for you. Always have a back up plan if this doesn't work out. Remember Upwork is not a job, it is a platform for freelancers. You are responsible for your own success not Upwork.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
25 of 95

The cold hard truth is that people making a full-time living on here are the exception to the rule, not the rule. I realize Upwork has to market around that fact, but people come here thinking it's easy money and the fact is that the odds are stacked against you. Making good money here is hard and statistically you'll fail.

 

Then add JSS and the fact that sooner or later you run into a nightmare client, someone who doesn't like your work, people who disappear, unreasonable clients, people with no money and you're just running uphill most of the time.

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
26 of 95

Dear OP,

 

Please, please, please stop repeatedly kvetching about not gaining contracts just yet.

 

I mean, do it once, I get it. You're venting and possibly searching for solutions. But, repeating it isn't going to solve your issue. And *most* of the FLs who respond on the forums are going to tell you the same thing (and we all vary from successful part time to successful full-time FL'ing on this platform). 

 

It's a digital psychology -- click = earn money. I understand.

 

But as everyone else has stated, it's not that easy because you are still dealing with humanzees and all of their wacky (and sometimes sane) psychology. 

 

I started with zero clients and no JSS just like everyone else. Then, I worked my ::::bleep:::: off persistently exploring variations of my profile overview and individualized proposals. 

 

It's a process. 

 

You did ask in the Job Skill Discussions about specifics of your profile (if I'm remembering the thread correctly). And I believe one (or more) of the expert translators who is/are successful on Upwork responded. 

 

I'm not saying that you should shut up (it may sound that way -- but that's not my intent). I am saying that it's not an overnight (heck, for many it's not even a "few week") process. 

 

Explore your market. Is there a large client base on Upwork for your specific skillset? Are there 20 million proposals in 3 minutes for the jobs for which you are applying? (Yes, I'm exaggerating.)

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
27 of 95

OK, let's just take a different point of view (I am a Libra. ".....but on the other hand" is my middle name.)

 

Let's look at the initial statement:

 

"That's killing new freelancers!"

 

Let's take it at face value and assume that it IS killing some new freelancers.

 

  1. Which new freelancers is it "killing?"
  2. Is "killing" those particular freelancers a bad idea or actually a good idea?
  3. Is it "killing" the right freelancers?

First of all: Nobody, to my knowledge, has so far been killed due to the way Upwork conducts business. Hence "killing" is the wrong word. "Eliminating from the active freelancer pool" would be a better way to put it.

 

1. Clearly not all new freelancers get "killed" - Some are, some are not. The ones with the skills and the business acumen to win contracts and successfully complete contracts don't get "killed" - they soon get established and thrive. The ones with nothing much to offer don't win contracts and either give up or get eliminated under Upwork's policy to close unsuccessful accounts eventually.

 

2. Actually it is a good idea because it allows the type of freelancers who are most likely to be profitable on and for (!) the platform to succeed, whilst culling dead weight. It makes sound business sense for the platform to encourage both the success of savvy new talent and the elimination of the "also rans!" It actually also helps those who fall by the wayside, as it would be cruel to encourage people who will never stand a real chance to keep wasting their time.

 

3. Yes, I think overall it is. There may be the odd case of collateral damage, but freelancers are a dime a dozen, so for every freelancer who might have made it and doesn't, there are a dozen more to take their place.

 

So, overall, the OP has a point. But when it comes to the bottom line that is not a bad thing.

 

 

 

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
28 of 95

To summarize:

 

Those Freelancers with the proven talent and verifiable track record in the B&M and online will flourish - after spending the time and effort to establish his/herself.

 

Those Freelancers who understand business and treat their freelance efforts as a business will flourish.

 

The rest - meh.  Upwork is not designed to be an educational or tutorial platform. Nor is client's work meant to be a practice run for learning trade.

 

I might sound harsh - but U is a business. So are the successful freelancers who use the site.

 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
29 of 95

Wendy, I feel like your response above could be the closer for about 60% of threads.

santo247
Active Member
Santiago C Member Since: May 29, 2017
30 of 95

I get my first job in a week, my wife in fifteen days.

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