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That's killing new freelancers!

purplepony
Community Guru
Pat M Member Since: Jun 18, 2016
71 of 95

Wendy, I'd give you many more kudos if I could.  IMO "you get what you pay for" is FAR more true than false. Personally I firmly believe that Freelancers that cut their rates are cutting their own throats.

 

 

barry_pat
Active Member
Pat B Member Since: Oct 12, 2017
72 of 95

I can certainly relate! 

 

It's bad enough that they charge us a larger percentage of our earnings than the people who earn more (sounds like the upcoming tax reform plan!).

 

But to add insult to injury, they've recently given those of us who earn less "private" profiles and stopped including us in the results when clients search for talent!


I have a very niche skill set for freelancing and fit this work in around both a full- and a part-time job (55 hours/week).

 

Not being included when clients search for freelancers IS making it harder and harder for new freelancers and those offering smaller skill sets.                                                                

 

How many of you respondees had to deal with that challenge on your way up?!?

pandoraharper
Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
73 of 95

Respondees?

 

Everyone one of us had our own set of unique challenges when we started. A successfull small business owner realizes that sometimes they have to adapt to new things. It's no different here.

 

If we can figure out how to work in this environment, so can you. Or not, as the case may be.

 

You might be surprised, though Smiley Happy

r2streu
Community Guru
Randall S Member Since: Mar 20, 2017
74 of 95

@Patricia B wrote:

I can certainly relate! 

 

It's bad enough that they charge us a larger percentage of our earnings than the people who earn more (sounds like the upcoming tax reform plan!).

 

 


 

To clarify, we don't get charged a lower percentage of earnings for earning more. It's on a client-by-client basis. I work with new clients every month. Only SOME of my clients are recurring, and of those, only a small few have sent me enough work to qualify for the lower rates. 

Most of us still pay 20% on most of our clients. And as long as we keep getting NEW clients, that's how it's going to be. 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
75 of 95

@Randy S wrote:


Most of us still pay 20% on most of our clients. And as long as we keep getting NEW clients, that's how it's going to be. 


 I see this assertion a lot, and I'm very interested in whether anyone actually has any data to support this idea. Have we seen stats on this somewhere?

barada00
Community Guru
Baris A Member Since: Mar 15, 2017
76 of 95

@Tiffany S wrote:

@Randy S wrote:


Most of us still pay 20% on most of our clients. And as long as we keep getting NEW clients, that's how it's going to be. 


 I see this assertion a lot, and I'm very interested in whether anyone actually has any data to support this idea. Have we seen stats on this somewhere?


 For some skills it is unavoidable. No data though...

researchediting
Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
77 of 95

@Tiffany S wrote:

@Randy S wrote:


Most of us still pay 20% on most of our clients. And as long as we keep getting NEW clients, that's how it's going to be. 


 I see this assertion a lot, and I'm very interested in whether anyone actually has any data to support this idea. Have we seen stats on this somewhere?


Tiffany,

I think "us" here may be understood as our colleagues whose work is repeatedly niche repeatedly yields one-off work with new clients. Those who work long-term in such a market shouldn't have to provide data to describe their experience to us, and to make factual statements about how Upwork policy affects them. You are correct to point out that this assertion fails to be generalizable to all newcomers. 

As an academic editor, I would long have described my niche as being mostly one-offs. Luckily, I found clients who have ongoing publication careers. My business evolved so it now often moves fairly quickly into the 10% commission bracket (within the space of a job or three for a client), and often outlasts Upwork's exclusivity period. Lucky me. Résumé writers, for example, might not find such opportunities here.

Best,

Michael

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
78 of 95

@Patricia B wrote:

I can certainly relate! 

 

It's bad enough that they charge us a larger percentage of our earnings than the people who earn more (sounds like the upcoming tax reform plan!).


 Except, of course, that the government's job is to operate in the best interests of the citizens. Upwork's job is to operate in the best interests of Upwork.

 

Do you think it's unreasonable when an online retailer offers free shipping if you purchase more than $50 in merchandise, but does not eat the cost of shipping for a $3 item?

 

What about when your automobile insurer gives you a "loyalty" discount when you renew?

 

When you order customized schwag for a business event, and the price per unit is lower if you order 5,000 pieces than if you order 1,00?

 

When a freelancer offers a lower hourly rate to a client who offers ongoing work of 20 hours/week than she does to a one-off client who is using her services for two hours?

 

 

cupidmedia
Community Guru
Jennifer D Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
79 of 95

As a client I hire new freelancers with no job history/Top Rated/Rising Talent/whatever *all the time*. Some of my best freelancer relationships have come from freelancers brand new to the platform. Experienced clients are often happy to take a chance on a new freelancer.

 

Like Pandora and others said: if you have a great profile, a great proposal, and a great portfolio, that says a lot and will help if you have no history.

pandoraharper
Community Guru
Pandora H Member Since: May 11, 2010
80 of 95

There are 3 specific newbies in the forums (not naming names) who got jobs the first 30 days they were here, because they read, read, and read some more. I've seen their profiles and except for work history, you would not know they just started on Upwork. THAT'S the sign of a good profile, and I have to assume their proposals are equally awesome.

 

On the flip side, I've also seen another 4 specific newbies in the forums who have posted lots of "omg help me NOW" threads, and who have not followed any advice. All of them have reported scams / been scammed, their profiles are horrible, and gawd only knows what their proposals look like. 1 of them has had 1 job, and the other 3 are waiting...and will likely continue to wait...........wait.............wait.

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