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syntagm
Member

The Threat of de-activation

I became aware yesterday that  UpWork accounts can be de-activated. I understand under which conditions it may happen and in fact broadly agree with the policy that drives it. The one reason for de-activation that bothers me is the a history of failed (non-accepted) proposals. As a relative new participant on UpWork the noob is almost forced to submit as many proposals as possible. For one there is a learning curve that must be climbed. For another establised UpWorkers are generally more successful that those who are still busy building their reputations.

 

Since yesterday I am now almost afraid to continue identifying opportunities and submitting proposals.

Just for the record I do NOT use the cut & paste technique and I do NOT go for every RFP that looks like something nice to do. I have narrowed both what I offer and when I submit to the optimum level for potential success.

 

Your comments will be valuable and appreciated.

 

Chris K

ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Hi Chris. It's hard to advise you, when no one outside Upwork knows what algorithm they're applying. But I see you've done 4 jobs already, including 2 this month. So I doubt you're in much danger. My success rate was similar to that in my first few months on Upwork, though I should probably add that I wasn't using up all my connects. (I spend quite a of time on my proposals, and have always been more limited by time than by number of connects.)

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9 REPLIES 9
2bf09090
Member

Yes its the policy of UpWork to maintain quality of talent in the pool / market place. 

 

Sometimes it seems very hard on some new freelancers and may fail to kick start their careers due to this reason.

 

Please share your profile to evaluate and provide useful insights.

aocumen
Community Manager
Community Manager

Hi Chris, 

 

Be assured that we do not take action based on isolated incidents of unsuccessful proposals. Only in the unusual case we find a freelancer has been repeatedly submitting many proposals but not winning jobs (or winning few) we take action. Typically, this means the opportunities on Upwork are not a good match for the freelancer’s skillset.

 

As you are new, I would recommend that you read up on the resources resources we have compiled here to help you get started on Upwork. 

Additionally, you may also want to check out these articles from our Hiring Headquarters to help you create proposals that win jobs, and help you boost your career on Upwork:

 


~ Avery
Upwork
gurvinder85
Member

Never Give up man...

I also noticed many things like these on upwork.
We need to proper work on upwork, spend more time here and apply jobs as per your skill.

 

Think positively and work hard you will get contracts.

Hi Chris. It's hard to advise you, when no one outside Upwork knows what algorithm they're applying. But I see you've done 4 jobs already, including 2 this month. So I doubt you're in much danger. My success rate was similar to that in my first few months on Upwork, though I should probably add that I wasn't using up all my connects. (I spend quite a of time on my proposals, and have always been more limited by time than by number of connects.)

syntagm
Member

I am really very thankful to all those who have taken time to pen a reply. I found your comments most useful. Over the last month I have narrowed my approach quite significantly. Instead of aiming at broad Virtual Assistance I concentrate solely on PowerPoint. I now select the RFP's with greater care and I have applied all the key learnings from UpWork recommendations that I have read with care.

 

The single biggest constraint that I have identified is the simple fact that I am a new kid on this block. Clearly professionals with a proven track record do better for all the right reasons.

 

kindest regards

 

Chris

 

Chris, I would suggest that you hide the tests that show below average and just above average results from your profile. Retake them when they allow you to do so, and if the scores are better, show them.

 

I'm also wondering if this sentence is appropriate: I have done and will continue to do any new SlideShare/UDEMY courseware to ensure that I remain at the forefront of what I do. While the intent is good - showing your prospective clients that you're keeping your skills up to date -, I'm not sure about the way you put it. Maybe others can chime in, but I think that it kinda gives away the feeling that you're still learning. Well, you are, we are all learning every day, but I would somehow rephrase this part so it really conveys the idea that you're already a top-notch expert in the field, who is closely monitoring the evolution of the industry and the latest trends. More than someone who is actually learning.

 

Don't take my comment at face value, let's see if someone else has anything to say about this.

 

And one last thing: the few times I hired on Upwork, I was surprised how much the photo on the profile did have an influence on the perceived professionalism of the applicant. I'm not speaking of the person on the photo, but on the photo itself. 

 

A professionally made photo, representing yourself posing in a professional attitude, in front of a neutral background (you know the kind of boring business photos you find on Linkedin), look better than the usual selfies that we are all used to shoot.

 

Your photo shows plenty of stuff in the background, it doesn't accentuate your face. I know it may sound silly, but when you use electronic communication to conduct business, you lack the personal interaction that you have in the B&M world. A good photo is a way to compensate for this, I believe. 

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"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless

What is the point of asking for input and not heeding it.

These are good points and I will certainly apply some or all of them

 

Thank you.


@Chris K wrote:

What is the point of asking for input and not heeding it.

These are good points and I will certainly apply some or all of them

 

Thank you.


Chris, that's a nice attitude to have. You'd be surprised at the freelancers who ask for advice then take umbrage because they don't agree with it or because it didn't relate *exactly* to what they asked.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce

Already implemented. Thanks.
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