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The client doesn't accept the work and doesn't explain the reason

olga_krav
Ace Contributor
Olga K Member Since: Oct 14, 2017
1 of 37

Hello everyone! Hope for your answers. I have a fixed price contract. The job description was extensive and at first glance it seemed detailed, but if to read a little, the conclusion is one - to make the design of 2 sites, similar to the attached links, but using other colors (the colors he wrote).

The task indicated that the design for 2 sites should be the same, but differ in the color palette. So, I did the design. To which the client responded, no, this is not what we need, need more minimalist, as in the examples. In addition, he added that they should be completely different. I say that you actually wrote that they should be the same, but ok, I will do another.

And I began to do. In the process of work, he twice changed the clarification - what of the sites should look Than, about the second design he wrote "our client is not happy with this result." (yes, yes, this is not a direct client, but an intermediary client). I answered - can you check with your client, what exactly he does not like, what exactly he wants to change or add or remove in the work? Otherwise, how can I guess what he needs? To which he replied that I should to make a very similar design as in the examples ... (thanks cap). I made a third time, even more similar to the examples .. But how completely copy other sites? It's not professionality. So I did it in the same style as in the examples but offered different options for the placement and design of all elements. In general, I am now waiting for his answer.

By the way, he answers rarely, skips some of my questions when I clarify about work. Because of this, this project lasts longer than necessary.

Sorry for the long text, just wanted you to understand the situation as much as possible. Now the question is, if he again answers something like "This is not that" or "I do not like", without specifying the details, what would you do? I'm just afraid for my reputation. Once I already got an inadequate client, and that really again ...

feed_my_eyes
Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
2 of 37

Olga K wrote:

Hello everyone! Hope for your answers. I have a fixed price contract. The job description was extensive and at first glance it seemed detailed, but if to read a little, the conclusion is one - to make the design of 2 sites, similar to the attached links, but using other colors (the colors he wrote).

The task indicated that the design for 2 sites should be the same, but differ in the color palette. So, I did the design. To which the client responded, no, this is not what we need, need more minimalist, as in the examples. In addition, he added that they should be completely different. I say that you actually wrote that they should be the same, but ok, I will do another.

And I began to do. In the process of work, he twice changed the clarification - what of the sites should look Than, about the second design he wrote "our client is not happy with this result." (yes, yes, this is not a direct client, but an intermediary client). I answered - can you check with your client, what exactly he does not like, what exactly he wants to change or add or remove in the work? Otherwise, how can I guess what he needs? To which he replied that I should to make a very similar design as in the examples ... (thanks cap). I made a third time, even more similar to the examples .. But how completely copy other sites? It's not professionality. So I did it in the same style as in the examples but offered different options for the placement and design of all elements. In general, I am now waiting for his answer.

By the way, he answers rarely, skips some of my questions when I clarify about work. Because of this, this project lasts longer than necessary.

Sorry for the long text, just wanted you to understand the situation as much as possible. Now the question is, if he again answers something like "This is not that" or "I do not like", without specifying the details, what would you do? I'm just afraid for my reputation. Once I already got an inadequate client, and that really again ...


It is definitely unethical to completely copy somebody else's web design (and no, changing the colour palette is not good enough - you're still stealing somebody else's work). I would never have bid on such a project in the first place, and on fixed price projects, I always specify how many revisions I'm willing to do. Sorry that this advice won't help you now, but you might want to keep it in mind for the future.

 

As for this project, all you can do at this point is say that you're willing to do one more round of revisions, but that you cannot get started until you receive clear responses to your questions. (I would suggest a conference call with your client AND your client's client, if possible.) Also state that if he requires further rounds of revisions, you will need him to set a new milestone for additional payments, or switch to an hourly project. Otherwise, you'll be stuck doing random revisions until his client sees something that catches his eye. 

olga_krav
Ace Contributor
Olga K Member Since: Oct 14, 2017
3 of 37
Yes, you're right. I’m completely against copying other people's works, so I’m doing my own designs (maybe he doesn’t accept them because he wants a copy? But I can't to do this. By submitting an application, I thought he meant the design style ..
tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
4 of 37

What is the official status? Did you submit the work for payment and he used the "request revisions" feature, or is all this back and forth happening outside the process?

olga_krav
Ace Contributor
Olga K Member Since: Oct 14, 2017
5 of 37
I submitted the work after I made the second designs, and didn't get his answer for a day. And after that he said that their client isn't satisfied with the design, but what exactly didn't answer
alphazomgy
Community Leader
Alexander B Member Since: Mar 30, 2017
6 of 37

Accept partial payment, demand full payment, or end the contract.

 

They will never be satisfied with your work unless you do twice the amount.

 

(I've seen this story play out a million times.) 

feed_my_eyes
Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
7 of 37

Alexander B wrote:

Accept partial payment, demand full payment, or end the contract.

 

They will never be satisfied with your work unless you do twice the amount.

 

(I've seen this story play out a million times.) 


Maybe, maybe not. I always think it's best to communicate with the client and try to sort things out - I've only ever cancelled contracts as a last resort.

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
8 of 37

If a client hired you to do a certain task, and you did the agreed-upon task, then the client needs to pay you.

 

It's that simple.

 

Otherwise, the client is being unprofessional and unethical.

 

If the client has a headache or wants to go skiing or lost funding for the project or hates your work or pretends he doesn't like your work or sincerely doesn't like your work... All of that is irrelevent.

 

You were hired to do Task X.

You did Task X.

Client is expected to release payment.

 

If the client hired you to do something that the client is passing on to somebody else, and that somebody else doesn't like your work, that has nothing to do with you.


The client who HIRED YOU still needs to PAY YOU.

 

Having said all that, there times when the correct tactical move for a freelancers is to negotiate with a client and accept a partial payment. Or do some other things, which can include ending the contract oneself, filing a dispute, etc.

 

Regardless of what the best move for a FREELANCER is... it is always the correct thing to do for a CLIENT to release payment to a freelancer who has done the agreed-upon work.

feed_my_eyes
Community Guru
Christine A Member Since: May 4, 2016
9 of 37

Preston H wrote:

If a client hired you to do a certain task, and you did the agreed-upon task, then the client needs to pay you.

 

It's that simple.

 

Otherwise, the client is being unprofessional and unethical.

 

If the client has a headache or wants to go skiing or lost funding for the project or hates your work or pretends he doesn't like your work or sincerely doesn't like your work... All of that is irrelevent.

 

You were hired to do Task X.

You did Task X.

Client is expected to release payment.

 

If the client hired you to do something that the client is passing on to somebody else, and that somebody else doesn't like your work, that has nothing to do with you.


The client who HIRED YOU still needs to PAY YOU.


The client hasn't said anything about not paying, he just wants HIS client to be happy with the work, which is not unreasonable. If the OP didn't set any limits on the number of revisions she was willing to do, then clarifying that is the first port of call, IMO.

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
10 of 37

re: "The client hasn't said anything about not paying, he just wants HIS client to be happy with the work, which is not unreasonable. If the OP didn't set any limits on the number of revisions she was willing to do, then clarifying that is the first port of call..."

 

Christine is correct about this.

 

Which is why an important thing for a FREELANCER to do is to specify that there will be no revisions granted, or there will be 1, or there will be X amount of time allotted for changes, etc.

 

If this is NOT DEFINED in the original agreement, then we can run into problems.

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