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Re: The fing with th-fronting

Community Guru
Natasa R Member Since: Feb 2, 2012
11 of 35

Douglas, 

 

This is not the original piece of text that I recorded. What I meant in my reply to you was that I wrote this text (in my own words, here in the forum) and used some of the words from the original text that were discussed with the client. I deliberately replaced the letters with the f's and v's just to illustrate what the client considered to be correct British English as if they were spoken. It was not a matter of conveying a transliterated accent, it was a normal piece of text. The reason I asked about the usage of th-fronting in British English is because of the discussion I had with the client.  

 

Anyway, no f's or v's were harmed during the interview. Smiley Very Happy

Community Guru
Douglas Michael M Member Since: May 22, 2015
12 of 35
Thanks, Natasa!

I can see how your client's expectations and explanations must have seemed peculiar, and worth further inquiry here.

Best,
Michael
Community Leader
John T Member Since: Mar 19, 2015
13 of 35

This really reads like the client doesn't know what they're talking about.

 

There are a number of dialects in the UK where this kind of thing is locally prevalent, but this is no way any kind of standard British accent.

Community Guru
Natasa R Member Since: Feb 2, 2012
14 of 35

That's what I know about th-fronting too. It's more prevalent in some dialects but not considered to be standard British English. After the conversation with the client I actually started wondering if its usage has increased in British English and if it is a common thing these days. 

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Community Leader
John T Member Since: Mar 19, 2015
15 of 35

> Hopefully a native British English speaker will come along and clarify.

For the record, I'm a  native British English speaker, and I also do a bit of narration work. And while I'm not the world's best at this, I can do a few different accents. "F" for "Th" is really not that commonplace. You do get it, but not all that much.

Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
16 of 35

I wasn't aware that (outside American sitcoms) there was such a thing as a 'British accent.' People just in England sound quite different depending in area, ethnicity and social class, yet alone within the 4 countries that make up the United Kingdom.

Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
17 of 35

Is this something to do with Asia, by any chance. In my experience they have an obsession with 'standard' native-speaking pronounciation that doesn't actually exist outside their imagination.

Community Guru
Natasa R Member Since: Feb 2, 2012
18 of 35

"Is this something to do with Asia, by any chance. In my experience they have an obsession with 'standard' native-speaking pronounciation that doesn't actually exist outside their imagination."

 

I only know that the client is from London.  

Community Guru
Natasa R Member Since: Feb 2, 2012
19 of 35

I said British and American accent just to distinguish the kind of English we were talking about. I know there are different dialects and accents within British English and American English and they all vary from one another. But to refer to what the client told me in his own words, which was "British accent", is what I understood as "British English". And by British English, I don't automatically think of th-fronting. I just found it weird that the client told me that I mispronounced the words with "th" instead of "f" and "v". 

Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
20 of 35

As others have commented, that's definitely a Cockney (Working class London)/ Essex accent. Why they would want a non-native speaker to do this, however, is anyone's guess.  Did he give any explanation as to his peculiar requirement?

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