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The fing with th-fronting

Community Guru
Natasa R Member Since: Feb 2, 2012
21 of 35

"Why they would want a non-native speaker to do this, however, is anyone's guess.  Did he give any explanation as to his peculiar requirement?"

 

The project involves translation and voice over, and the client wants the same person's voice to be heard in English and Swedish. But I doubt he will find any translator for this job.  

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
22 of 35

There are dozens of British accents. Even if he had hired a Brit to do this, he might have had a problem.

Sumfing/sumfink (cockney for something) - but I would bet a zillion on it that no cockney ever said Fursday for Thursday. Just possibly, the 'h' might get dropped and it would be 'Tursday' or 'Tursdee'. 

 

OK other Brits . . . smack me down.

Community Guru
Krisztina U Member Since: Aug 7, 2009
23 of 35

What a bizarre interview! For future reference:

 

 

Smiley Very Happy

Community Guru
Natasa R Member Since: Feb 2, 2012
24 of 35

A ha ha! Thanks Krisztina! Smiley Very Happy Yes, a bizarre interview indeed. I will probably need more lessons before I can accept a job that requires a Cockney accent. Lol

 

@Nichola

 

"...but I would bet a zillion on it that no cockney ever said Fursday for Thursday. Just possibly, the 'h' might get dropped and it would be 'Tursday' or 'Tursdee'."

 

I am not the right person to answer this, but the client said it should be with "f". After Krisztina's video, I also checked this one out. I don't know how accurate this is but according to this man, they pronounce Thursday as Fursday. 

 

 

 

Ace Contributor
Leila J Member Since: Jan 9, 2015
25 of 35

Look no further, Natasa, Jason is your man! He's the genuine article.

 

He puts me to shame because, even though I'm English, I could not even aspire to imitate him.

Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
26 of 35

Oooh! I think my zillions might be wavering a bit - however, I might still fight from my corner Smiley Wink Watch this space . . .

 (I do back down, when I know I have lost!)

Community Guru
Stephen B Member Since: Dec 4, 2012
27 of 35

What a bizarre thread! I'm not goung to go back copying and pasting, so I'll just put down a few thoughts:

 

Yes, there are hundreds of "British" accents/dialects. There is one called "received pronunciation" that is dictated by class/aspiration/snobbishness rather than region. But there is no such thing as a British accent. Consider in "Frasier" - Daphne Moon is an English girl from Manchester, yet her brother has a thick Cockney accent - yet presumably to American audiences they both just sound like English accents, even though they're light years apart.

 

Some of these regional accents pronounce th as f, but they are few and far between. Cockney is an obvious example, but also I think of the newer "black" street accents (Please don't anyone play the racism card on me here).

 

For a client to ask someone to just pronounce a consonant group in a particular way is strange - because just by pronouncing th as f doesn't make it a Cockney/black street/Cornish or whatever accent. You need a lot more for that, and you either need a native speaker of that accent or a very good voice actor (Consider **bleep** Van **bleep**'s horrendous attempt at a Cockney accent in Mary Poppins as how it can so easily go wrong...).

 

It seems to me that the cliet is either deranged or completely ignorant,  has very bad English him/herself and got his/her info from a strange inappropriate source. You will never please this kind of client, because they don't have the facility to accept that someone knows more than they do.

 

I know about this subject...I went to the speech therapist many years ago, and said "I have a problem - I can't pronounce my Fs or TH's"

 

and the speech therapist said to me

 

"you can't say fairer than that, then..."

Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
28 of 35

Yes, I was going to mention Daphne's brother in Frazier as a good example of the type of 'British' accent that only exists on American film and TV. Other classic examples of this Include vampire Spike in Buffy, Christan Slater in Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves, Keanu Reeves in Dracula AND Much Ado about Nothing, Forrest Whitaker in The Crying Game and, of course, the immortal **bleep** (Gawd blimey Maree Pawpins, oi's cleanin' the chimnees!) Van **bleep**.

 

 

I'd criticise Kevin Costner in Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves too, except he never bothered to try in the first place. 

Community Guru
Ramon B Member Since: Jan 11, 2015
29 of 35

For God's sake, **bleep** Van **bleep** is not swearing, it's his name!

Community Guru
Isabelle Anne A Member Since: May 19, 2014
30 of 35

LOL. Let's try Richard Wayne "D i c k" Van D y k e

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