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The way Upwork takes the fees is very frustrating!

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
31 of 38

Clients don't need to understand how it works. I can't think of any reason a freelancer should ever be mentioning the fee to a client, any more than you would be explaining to a client that your rates had to factor in the rent on your office space or the fact that you need a new computer. It's a cost of doing business; you build it in and present the result. 

 

I like the way it works because I never have to think about it or talk about it or remember to make a payment.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
32 of 38

That dude necro'd this thread, but smh really. Just lay your rates on them for godsakes what is so hard about this?

ottofritzler
Active Member
Fritzler O Member Since: Sep 5, 2016
33 of 38

Jennifer, kind as always Smiley Happy

 

 

Always helping people.

allpurposewriter
Community Guru
Anthony H Member Since: Feb 22, 2017
34 of 38

Elena A,

 

I agree. I have the same hangup. But the rest of the advice here is right. Quit being apologetic about your price and let the chips fall where they may. If you need to lower your price (so that you earn $9 per hour, for example, instead of $10), then that's the game of life. If you want to earn $10, then do the math and name that price.

 

I did not know you could adjust the "Freelancer will earn" box and let Upwork do the math. That's handy.

 

The problem is not whether or not the client understands the Upwork fee or not. The problem is that they tend to put down round figures for their budgets -- $10 or $15 or $100. That does put you in a position of asking for more if you happen to want those round figures for your own take home pay -- either because you want more money or because you happen to be obsessive compulisive, like me. 

The question it might be great to hear feedback on is this: Hey everybody -- if you put $10 in the box indicating what you want to earn and the price of the job goes up accordingly ($11 and 11 cents), do you find this is causing clients to back away or do you sense that enough clients accept the new price to make it non-detrimental to the freelancer?

Lately, if I have to explain the Upwork fee to a client, I only do so after I've proven myself to the client and think I have the client's attention. But whether or not they even get it is less important to me these days, given the advice from these other experienced Upwork pros.

I usually get a quick agreement and I'm beginning to see the light. Asking for a bump does not require an explaination of Upwork's fee. I usually tell them, "I have bills to pay and I don't live in Haiti." That usually works fine.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
35 of 38

I dunno... I just don't think about it that much. if someone says to me "you're the most expensive person in the list," I just say "yep, I know."

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
36 of 38

@Jennifer M wrote:

I dunno... I just don't think about it that much. if someone says to me "you're the most expensive person in the list," I just say "yep, I know."


 I generally don't respond to that at all, unless it's phrased as a question or a request to lower my rates.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
37 of 38

I don't get it a lot. It's funny because I used to get it more back in my cheaper days. Most of the time, if I'm too much they don't bother responding to me.


But I've had people say it and I just say "yep." LOL I don't even know what they want me to say. I'm not an idiot that immediately lowers their rate over some benign comment. That's just stupid.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
38 of 38

@Anthony H wrote:

 


1) The question it might be great to hear feedback on is this: Hey everybody -- if you put $10 in the box indicating what you want to earn and the price of the job goes up accordingly ($11 and 11 cents), do you find this is causing clients to back away or do you sense that enough clients accept the new price to make it non-detrimental to the freelancer?

2) Lately, if I have to explain the Upwork fee to a client, I only do so after I've proven myself to the client and think I have the client's attention. But whether or not they even get it is less important to me these days, given the advice from these other experienced Upwork pros.

3) I usually tell them, "I have bills to pay and I don't live in Haiti."


 1) I think you're overthinking it. I like to charge round numbers for fixed rate contracts (charge, not earn) - so if I want to earn (at least) $ 50 for something, I don't bid $ 62.50, I bid $ 65 or $ 70.

 

2) I honestly don't think I have ever mentioned the fee. I also don't think I ever would. I do not justify, discuss, validate or explain what I charge. I don't let myself dragged down that path.

 

3) Again, same as 2) - I would never say something like that.

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